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Your portal to the Romney Marsh in south east Kent

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Fairfield Church on Romney Marsh
Fairfield Church on Romney Marsh

Welcome to the Romney Marsh, known for its natural beauty, the diversity of its habitats, rich history, extensive coastline and its sheep. With excellent accommodation, outstanding attractions, fine food and drink, varied walking routes and many sandy beaches, Romney Marsh is an ideal place to visit, explore and enjoy.

Romney Marsh is a sparsely populated wetland area in the counties of Kent and East Sussex in the south-east of England. Covering about 100 square miles, Romney  Marsh is one of the three great coastal marshlands of southern England. In common with these marshlands, almost all of Romney Marsh lies below the level of high tides and has always under threat of flooding by the sea or fresh water.

Romney Marsh is also known as the Fifth Continent. Thomas Ingoldsby, the pen name of 19th century author and cleric, wrote in his The Ingoldsby Legends: The World, according to the best geographers, is divided into Europe, Asia, Africa, America, and Romney Marsh.


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John Betjeman wrote about Romney Marsh:

Romney Marsh, on the Sussex border of Kent and close to the sea. Romney Marsh, where the roads wind like streams through pasture and the sky is always three-quarters of the landscape. The sounds I associate with Romney Marsh are the bleating of innumerable sheep and the whistle of the sea wind in old willow trees. The sea has given a colour to this district: it has spotted with silver the oak posts and rails; it gives the grass and the rushes a grey salty look and turns the red bricks and tiles of Fairfield Church a saffron yellow.


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