The Lively Morgue

The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

At the end of 1958, the Capitol in Washington got a house-cleaning — everything from dusting signs to refreshing the paint on frescoes, like this one by Constantino Brumidi, in a room that formerly housed the District of Columbia Committee and was being readied as the office for the Senate majority leader, Lyndon B. Johnson. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times
At the end of 1958, the Capitol in Washington got a house-cleaning — everything from dusting signs to refreshing the paint on frescoes, like this one by Constantino Brumidi, in a room that formerly housed the District of Columbia Committee and was being readied as the office for the Senate majority leader, Lyndon B. Johnson. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

At the end of 1958, the Capitol in Washington got a house-cleaning — everything from dusting signs to refreshing the paint on frescoes, like this one by Constantino Brumidi, in a room that formerly housed the District of Columbia Committee and was being readied as the office for the Senate majority leader, Lyndon B. Johnson. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

April 5, 1946: This image of the catacombs of the Metropolitan Museum of Art accompanied a letter to the editor published Dec. 7, 1970, that pointed out, citing a fact sheet issued by the museum, that “90 percent of the American paintings and sculptures, 55 percent of the objects assigned to the American wing, 55 percent of the European paintings and 70 percent of Western European art are not on view.” The writer suggests several alternative means to display hidden art. Photo: The New York Times
April 5, 1946: This image of the catacombs of the Metropolitan Museum of Art accompanied a letter to the editor published Dec. 7, 1970, that pointed out, citing a fact sheet issued by the museum, that “90 percent of the American paintings and sculptures, 55 percent of the objects assigned to the American wing, 55 percent of the European paintings and 70 percent of Western European art are not on view.” The writer suggests several alternative means to display hidden art. Photo: The New York Times

April 5, 1946: This image of the catacombs of the Metropolitan Museum of Art accompanied a letter to the editor published Dec. 7, 1970, that pointed out, citing a fact sheet issued by the museum, that “90 percent of the American paintings and sculptures, 55 percent of the objects assigned to the American wing, 55 percent of the European paintings and 70 percent of Western European art are not on view.” The writer suggests several alternative means to display hidden art. Photo: The New York Times

Sept. 6, 1957: Frank Lloyd Wright with an assistant assesses his latest creation, a museum to house Solomon R. Guggenheim’s growing modern art collection.”Mr. Guggenheim came to me twelve years ago and said he wanted a museum specifically for the advanced type of paintings he collected,” Mr. Wright said. He went on, in an absorbing piece for The Times magazine: “ ‘This is the only organic building in New York,’ says Wright. ‘Each part is the consequence of the other, as things are in nature.’ ” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
Sept. 6, 1957: Frank Lloyd Wright with an assistant assesses his latest creation, a museum to house Solomon R. Guggenheim’s growing modern art collection.”Mr. Guggenheim came to me twelve years ago and said he wanted a museum specifically for the advanced type of paintings he collected,” Mr. Wright said. He went on, in an absorbing piece for The Times magazine: “ ‘This is the only organic building in New York,’ says Wright. ‘Each part is the consequence of the other, as things are in nature.’ ” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Sept. 6, 1957: Frank Lloyd Wright with an assistant assesses his latest creation, a museum to house Solomon R. Guggenheim’s growing modern art collection.”Mr. Guggenheim came to me twelve years ago and said he wanted a museum specifically for the advanced type of paintings he collected,” Mr. Wright said. He went on, in an absorbing piece for The Times magazine: “ ‘This is the only organic building in New York,’ says Wright. ‘Each part is the consequence of the other, as things are in nature.’ ” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times