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Hacker Halted Europe


 


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Reader rating:
Article source: CoDe (2010 Mar/Apr)


Article Pages:  1  2 3 - Next >


Using the Amazon Web Service SDK for .NET

The richest set of cloud computing services comes from a little e-commerce company known as Amazon.com. Developers can access the Amazon Web Services (AWS) platform using numerous tools including the .NET platform. Amazon.com is a major player in the cloud computing space and has numerous services available to developers. In late 2009, Amazon released the AWS SDK for .NET. This article will demonstrate using the AWS SDK to create a custom backup service using the Amazon Simple Storage Service (S3).

My company has a web server where I house a number of different web applications. All of these web applications use SQL Server as their database platform. One of the responsibilities of a server host is to back up the databases on a regular basis. Over the years I have employed a number of different backup solutions including: back up data from one server to another, use portable hard drives and recently I’ve used solutions like Carbonite and Mozy to perform online backups. Each of these solutions has its ups and downs and I have never been satisfied with any of them. Being a clever hacker, I decided to take the job into my own hands; I would backup my database applications into the “cloud" using the Amazon cloud.

I chose the Amazon cloud for a number of reasons. Amazon charges approximately $.15 per gigabyte per month for storage of my database files. I will be responsible for paying data upload charges later in 2010 and these data transfer charges will be priced around $.0.15 per gigabyte as well. One item of note: the prices for data storage and transfer go down as volume goes up. Amazon offers the ability to control how and when data is uploaded and removed from my own personal cloud. This flexibility is paramount to my decision to use Amazon.

This article will discuss how you can create a custom SQL Server backup solution.

Types of Amazon Web Services

Table 1 describes the Amazon Web Services available in the Amazon cloud:

For full descriptions and cost descriptions of the above listed services, consult the Amazon Web Services website http://aws.amazon.com.

Registering with Amazon

The first step to using the Amazon cloud service is to establish an account with Amazon. If you have already ordered books from Amazon.com you are already covered. Once you have established a basic Amazon account, go to http://aws.amazon.com and select from the list of services on the left-hand side of the screen (Figure 1) Click the signup button and you will be asked to enter a phone number (Figure 2). Amazon will show you a PIN number (Figure 3) that you will verify via a phone call (that happens almost as quickly as you click the signup button). Once you have signed up for a service you may need to generate a new access code. To generate an access code and key, select Your Account - Security Credentials from the menu. To generate a new key, select the “Create a new Access Key” from the Access Keys tab. This will generate two items: an access key and a secret key. Your access key will be shown on screen (Figure 4) your secret key is hidden behind a link. When you make calls to Amazon Web Services you will be required to use your access key and secret key to authenticate your requests.

Click for a larger version of this image.

Figure 1: Selecting an Amazon Web Service to sign up for.

Click for a larger version of this image.

Figure 2: Amazon Web Service Sign Up screen.

Click for a larger version of this image.

Figure 3: PIN to be entered when Amazon calls you.

Click for a larger version of this image.

Figure 4: Getting Access Key and Secret Key dialog.

Once you have signed up for a service and created an access key you are ready to create your backup solution.

&

By: Rod Paddock

Rod Paddock is the editor of CoDe Magazine. Rod has been a software developer for more than 10 years and has worked with tools like Visual Studio .NET SQL Server, Visual Basic, Visual FoxPro, Delphi and numerous others.

Rod is president of Dash Point Software, Inc. Dash Point is an award winning software development firm that specializes in developing applications for small to large businesses. Dash Point has delivered applications for numerous corporations like: Six Flags, First Premier Bank, Intel, Microsoft and the US Coast Guard.

Rod is also VP of Development for SQL Server tools maker, Red Matrix Technologies. (www.redmatrix.com).



Table 1: Types of Amazon Web Services.
Service NameDescription
Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2)Amazon EC2 is a service where you can provision servers to run your applications. You can provision multiple different flavors of Linux and Windows servers.
Amazon SimpleDBAmazon SimpleDB is a web service that gives you the ability to create data structures, store and query data.
Amazon Simple Storage Service (Amazon S3)Amazon S3 gives you the ability to store text, images and binary objects into a scalable data store. This article will use the Amazon S3 service as its data store.
Amazon Simple Queue Service (Amazon SQS)Amazon SQS give you the ability to queue and retrieve messages.
Amazon Elastic MapReduceAmazon Elastic MapReduce give you the ability to index and process large amounts of data using the Open Source indexing engine known as Hadoop.
Amazon Relational Database Service (Amazon RDS)Amazon RDS give you the ability to implement the full database services provided by the MySQL database engine.


Article Pages:  1  2 3 - Next Page: 'The Backup Solution' >>

Page 1: Using the Amazon Web Service SDK for .NET
Page 2: The Backup Solution
Page 3: Uploading Objects

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