Coquerel’s Sifaka

Coquerel’s Sifaka

Coquerel’s sifaka (Propithecus coquereli) are delicate leaf-eaters from the dry northwestern forests of Madagascar. The Sifaka of Madagascar are distinguished from other lemurs by their mode of locomotion: these animals maintain a distinctly vertical posture and leap through the trees using just the strength of their back legs. Their spectacular method of locomotion is known as...

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Feeding

Coquerel’s Sifaka feed on young leaves, flowers, fruit, bark and dead wood in the wet season, and mature leaves and buds in the dry season. Leaves make up a significant portion of the sifaka diet both in the wild as well as in captivity. In fact, the digestive system of these folivorous primates requires that...

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Fact Sheet

Order: Primates; Suborder: Prosimii Family: Indriidae; Genus: Propithecus Species: verrauxi; Subspecies : coquereli Related Species See Diademed Sifaka. (LINK TO DIADEMED SIFAKA) Key Facts Adult Size : 7.3 – 9.9 pounds Social life : Sociable, small family groups of 3 – 10 animals of varying ages Habitat : northwestern dry deciduous forest Diet : young...

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Reproduction

In the wild, female Coquerel’s sifaka give birth to one offspring in mid-summer, after a gestation period of approximately 162 days. Infants cling to their mothers’ bellies for the first three to four weeks of life. Then, the young sifaka will begin spending a gradually increasing amount of time riding, jockey style, on mom’s back....

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Social Behavior

Coquerel’s sifaka live in social groups of between 3 and 10 individuals, and age and sex composition of the groups vary widely. Females are dominant to males, which gives them preferential access to food and the choice of with whom to mate. A home range of between 10 and 22 acres (4 – 9 ha)...

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Habitat/Conservation

The Lemur Center’s colony of Coquerel’s sifaka is the most successful breeding colony in the world of this species or any species of sifaka. The Center maintains 21 animals (14 males, 12 females). The Lemur Center has been successful enough with our breeding program to send animals to other zoological institutions. The Los Angeles Zoo...

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Gallery

[flagallery gid=8 name="Duke Lemur...

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