Errors found while checking this document as HTML 4.01 Strict!

Result: 21 Errors, 21 warning(s)
:
: iso-8859-1
: HTML 4.01 Strict
Root Element: html
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Validation Output: 21 Errors

  1. Error Line 23, Column 19: there is no attribute "LANGUAGE"
    	<script language="javascript" src="http://www.forkscoffeeshop.com/scripts/func…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  2. Error Line 41, Column 78: there is no attribute "BORDER"
    …          <img src="http://www.forkscoffeeshop.com/logo.gfx" alt="" border="0">

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  3. Error Line 50, Column 48: there is no attribute "TARGET"
    …frontpage"><a href="menus.php" target="_parent"><img src="http://www.forkscoff…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  4. Error Line 50, Column 183: there is no attribute "ALIGN"
    … title="Forks Coffee Shop Menu" align="right"/ hspace="10" vspace="4" border="…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  5. Warning Line 50, Column 190: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …"Forks Coffee Shop Menu" align="right"/ hspace="10" vspace="4" border="0" onLo…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  6. Warning Line 51, Column 145: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ashington's Best Family Restaurant<br /><span style="font-size: 18px">&nbsp;&n…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  7. Error Line 51, Column 426: element "U" undefined
    …00; font-size: 12px">Welcome to the <u>Forks Coffee Shop</u> Restaurant in For…

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  8. Error Line 51, Column 760: document type does not allow element "A" here
    …html"><strong><em><a href="to_go.html"><strong><em><a href="to_go.html"><p><st…

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  9. Error Line 51, Column 793: document type does not allow element "A" here
    …html"><strong><em><a href="to_go.html"><p><strong><em><img border="0" hspace="…

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  10. Error Line 51, Column 796: document type does not allow element "P" here; missing one of "OBJECT", "MAP", "BUTTON" start-tag
    …l"><strong><em><a href="to_go.html"><p><strong><em><img border="0" hspace="5" …

    The mentioned element is not allowed to appear in the context in which you've placed it; the other mentioned elements are the only ones that are both allowed there and can contain the element mentioned. This might mean that you need a containing element, or possibly that you've forgotten to close a previous element.

    One possible cause for this message is that you have attempted to put a block-level element (such as "<p>" or "<table>") inside an inline element (such as "<a>", "<span>", or "<font>").

  11. Error Line 51, Column 832: there is no attribute "HSPACE"
    …<p><strong><em><img border="0" hspace="5" vspace="5" align="left" src="http://…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  12. Error Line 51, Column 843: there is no attribute "VSPACE"
    …<em><img border="0" hspace="5" vspace="5" align="left" src="http://www.forksco…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  13. Warning Line 51, Column 919: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …coffeeshop.com/images/sack_lunch.jpg" /><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong><…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  14. Error Line 51, Column 919: required attribute "ALT" not specified
    …coffeeshop.com/images/sack_lunch.jpg" /><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong><…

    The attribute given above is required for an element that you've used, but you have omitted it. For instance, in most HTML and XHTML document types the "type" attribute is required on the "script" element and the "alt" attribute is required for the "img" element.

    Typical values for type are type="text/css" for <style> and type="text/javascript" for <script>.

  15. Warning Line 51, Column 942: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ack_lunch.jpg" /><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></p></a><a href="to_go.h…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  16. Error Line 51, Column 942: document type does not allow element "A" here
    …ack_lunch.jpg" /><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></p></a><a href="to_go.h…

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  17. Error Line 51, Column 948: end tag for "A" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    …nch.jpg" /><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></p></a><a href="to_go.html" /…

    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  18. Info Line 51, Column 921: start tag was here
    …ffeeshop.com/images/sack_lunch.jpg" /><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></p…
  19. Warning Line 51, Column 987: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …</strong></p></a><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></a><a href="to_go.html"…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  20. Error Line 51, Column 987: document type does not allow element "A" here
    …</strong></p></a><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></a><a href="to_go.html"…

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  21. Error Line 51, Column 993: end tag for "A" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    …ng></p></a><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></a><a href="to_go.html" /></e…

    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  22. Info Line 51, Column 966: start tag was here
    …="to_go.html" /></em></strong></p></a><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></a…
  23. Warning Line 51, Column 1028: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …/em></strong></a><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></a></em></strong><p>In …

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  24. Error Line 51, Column 1028: document type does not allow element "A" here
    …/em></strong></a><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></a></em></strong><p>In …

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  25. Error Line 51, Column 1034: end tag for "A" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    …strong></a><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></a></em></strong><p>In a hurr…

    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  26. Info Line 51, Column 1007: start tag was here
    …href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></a><a href="to_go.html" /></em></strong></a…
  27. Warning Line 51, Column 1213: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    … open daily from 5:30am - 8:00pm. <br />Phone us at&nbsp;360-374-6769.</em></s…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  28. Warning Line 51, Column 1340: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …g>Forks Coffee Shop</strong>&nbsp;<br /></span><span class="street-address">24…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  29. Warning Line 51, Column 1428: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …Ave</span><a href="" target="_parent" />&nbsp;- <strong style="color: #cc0000"…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  30. Error Line 51, Column 1492: document type does not allow element "A" here
    …olor: #cc0000"><a href="location.html">MAP</a><br /></strong><span class="loca…

    The element named above was found in a context where it is not allowed. This could mean that you have incorrectly nested elements -- such as a "style" element in the "body" section instead of inside "head" -- or two elements that overlap (which is not allowed).

    One common cause for this error is the use of XHTML syntax in HTML documents. Due to HTML's rules of implicitly closed elements, this error can create cascading effects. For instance, using XHTML's "self-closing" tags for "meta" and "link" in the "head" section of a HTML document may cause the parser to infer the end of the "head" section and the beginning of the "body" section (where "link" and "meta" are not allowed; hence the reported error).

  31. Warning Line 51, Column 1504: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …0"><a href="location.html">MAP</a><br /></strong><span class="locality">Forks<…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  32. Warning Line 51, Column 1618: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …n> <span class="postal-code">98331<br />--------------------------------------…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  33. Error Line 51, Column 1678: end tag for "A" omitted, but its declaration does not permit this
    …----------------------------</span></p><p align="center"><span><strong><a href…

    • You forgot to close a tag, or
    • you used something inside this tag that was not allowed, and the validator is complaining that the tag should be closed before such content can be allowed.

    The next message, "start tag was here" points to the particular instance of the tag in question); the positional indicator points to where the validator expected you to close the tag.

  34. Info Line 51, Column 1400: start tag was here
    …street-address">241 S Forks Ave</span><a href="" target="_parent" />&nbsp;- <s…
  35. Error Line 51, Column 1688: there is no attribute "ALIGN"
    …------------------</span></p><p align="center"><span><strong><a href="http://w…

    You have used the attribute named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not support that attribute for this element. This error is often caused by incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Transitional" document type to get the "target" attribute), or by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "marginheight" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).

    This error may also result if the element itself is not supported in the document type you are using, as an undefined element will have no supported attributes; in this case, see the element-undefined error message for further information.

    How to fix: check the spelling and case of the element and attribute, (Remember XHTML is all lower-case) and/or check that they are both allowed in the chosen document type, and/or use CSS instead of this attribute. If you received this error when using the <embed> element to incorporate flash media in a Web page, see the FAQ item on valid flash.

  36. Warning Line 51, Column 1814: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …om/photos.php">NEW PHOTOS - CLICK HERE!</a></strong></span></p><br/><br/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  37. Warning Line 51, Column 1819: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …om/photos.php">NEW PHOTOS - CLICK HERE!</a></strong></span></p><br/><br/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  38. Error Line 52, Column 8: element "CENTER" undefined
    <center><a href="photos.php" target="_parent"><img src="http://www.forkscoffees…

    You have used the element named above in your document, but the document type you are using does not define an element of that name. This error is often caused by:

    • incorrect use of the "Strict" document type with a document that uses frames (e.g. you must use the "Frameset" document type to get the "<frameset>" element),
    • by using vendor proprietary extensions such as "<spacer>" or "<marquee>" (this is usually fixed by using CSS to achieve the desired effect instead).
    • by using upper-case tags in XHTML (in XHTML attributes and elements must be all lower-case).
  39. Warning Line 52, Column 204: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ere To See Restaurant PHotos" align=""/ hspace="10" vspace="4" border="0" onLo…

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  40. Warning Line 54, Column 385: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ly Dining - Giant Pancakes - Home Made Pies</span></strong></p><br/><br/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  41. Warning Line 54, Column 390: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …ly Dining - Giant Pancakes - Home Made Pies</span></strong></p><br/><br/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  42. Warning Line 55, Column 238: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …e rainforests and a great variety <br />of visible wildlife, the West Side of …

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  43. Warning Line 55, Column 691: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …s a great time to visit The REST of the Olympic Peninsula! </p><br/><br/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  44. Warning Line 55, Column 696: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    …s a great time to visit The REST of the Olympic Peninsula! </p><br/><br/></div>

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  45. Warning Line 63, Column 5: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br /><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

  46. Warning Line 63, Column 11: NET-enabling start-tag requires SHORTTAG YES
    <br /><br />

    For the current document, the validator interprets strings like <FOO /> according to legacy rules that break the expectations of most authors and thus cause confusing warnings and error messages from the validator. This interpretation is triggered by HTML 4 documents or other SGML-based HTML documents. To avoid the messages, simply remove the "/" character in such contexts. NB: If you expect <FOO /> to be interpreted as an XML-compatible "self-closing" tag, then you need to use XHTML or HTML5.

    This warning and related errors may also be caused by an unquoted attribute value containing one or more "/". Example: <a href=http://w3c.org>W3C</a>. In such cases, the solution is to put quotation marks around the value.

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