Analysis News

Photos of the week: Border Police bloopers

This week: Border Police bloopers in Bil’in, asylum seekers in Tel Aviv, Palestinian activists launch campaign in the Jordan Valley, anti-Arab graffiti in Silwan, ultra-orthodox Jews against the draft in Jerusalem, a far-right politician hands out award for McCarthyism in Israeli schools, and solidarity outside Holot ‘open’ detention center.

Israeli border policemen jump out of their jeep after a tear grande exploded unintentionally inside it as they were trying to disperse the weekly protest against the Israeli wall in the West Bank village of Bilin, February 7, 2014. (photo: Hamde Abu Rahma/Activestills.org)

Israeli Border Policemen jump out of their jeep after a tear gas grenade unintentionally exploded inside it, as they were trying to disperse the weekly protest against the Israeli wall in the West Bank village of Bil’in, February 7, 2014. (photo: Hamde Abu Rahma/Activestills.org)

 

African asylum seekers sleep in Levinsky Park, south Tel Aviv, on the fifth day of an ongoing protest, February 6, 2013. The sit-in protested the new Holot detention center for African immigrants and called on the Israeli government to recognize their refugee rights. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

African asylum seekers sleep in Levinsky Park, south Tel Aviv, on the fifth day of an ongoing protest, February 6, 2013. The sit-in protested the new Holot detention center for African immigrants and called on the Israeli government to recognize their refugee rights. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

An Eritrean Asylum seeker cleans, after spending the night in Levnisky park, South Tel Aviv, on their eighth day of an on going protest, on the early hours of February 9, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

An Eritrean Asylum seeker sweeps the ground, after spending the night in Levnisky park, South Tel Aviv, on their eighth day of an ongoing protest, during the early hours of February 9, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

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PHOTOS: Rightists award student who persecuted 'left-wing' teacher

Far-right former MK Michael Ben-Ari and notorious Hebron settler Baruch Marzel hold an award ceremony for a high school student who tried to have her teacher fired for expressing “left-wing” views.

A "Jewish State award" given to Sapir sabah, during a ceremony orgenized by Michael Ben-Ari, Israel, February 9, 2014. (Activestills.org)

The “Jewish State award” given to Sapir Sabah at a ceremony organized by nationalist former MK Michael Ben-Ari, Kiryat Tivon, February 9, 2014. (Activestills.org)

A very strange ceremony took place in the small town of Kiryat Tivon, in northern Israel on Sunday. Former Knesset member Michael Ben-Ari gave momentarily famous high-school student Sapir Sabah the “Jewish State Award” at an event attended by a variegated mix of hardline settlement leaders, followers of the late Rabbi Meir Kahane and anti-African refugee activists from south Tel Aviv. Outside, a group of local residents protested the ceremony, calling those inside “fascists” and shouting, ”Tivon is not Hebron.” Police stood in the middle and prevented the two sides from clashing.

The award commended Sabah for “bravely standing up for the dignity of the nation of Israel” and defending the honor of its soldiers against those “dirty pieces of debris” who seek to undermine the Jewish people’s hold on the Land of Israel. Earlier this year the 12th grader publicly denounced her civics teacher, Adam Verete, for exposing his students to “extremist left-wing views” – allegedly by questioning the Israeli army’s morality and the legitimacy of a Jewish state. Months before she herself will be drafted into the army, Sabah found those views extremely distressing and wrote a letter to the education minister. The affair might have ended there if not for the intervention of Michael Ben-Ari, who reposted the letter on Facebook and took up her cause. Ben-Ari’s campaign turned the affair into a public battle against those he accused of “poisoning the wells of the education system.”

Sapir Sabah recieves a "Jewish State" award, during a ceremony orgenized by Michael Ben-Ari , Israel, February 9, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Sapir Sabah receives the “Jewish State” award, during a ceremony organized by  former MK Michael Ben-Ari , Kiryat Tivon, February 9, 2014. (Activestills.org)

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PHOTOS: Ein Hijleh village evicted after seven days of protest

One week ago, some 300 Palestinian activists established the protest village of ‘Ein Hijleh’ in a cluster of palm trees and long-abandoned houses north of the Dead Sea. Their goal was to protest Israeli government demands to retain control of the Jordan Valley as part of a U.S.-brokered peace deal. One week later, their encampment was forcibly evicted by Israeli forces in the early morning hours.

Photos by: Hamde Abu Rahma, Keren Manor, Ryan Rodrick Beiler and Oren Ziv / Activestills.org

Palestinians shout slogans in the in Ein Hijleh protest village, in the Jordan Valley, West Bank January 31, 2014. Over 300 Palestinians participated in the action, as part of Melh Al-Ard (Salt of the Earth) campaign against the Israeli plans to annex the Jordan valley, discussed during the current round of negotiation-talks between the PA and Israel, coordinated by John Kerry.

Palestinians shout slogans in the in Ein Hijleh protest village, in the Jordan Valley, West Bank January 31, 2014. Over 300 Palestinians participated in the action, as part of Melh Al-Ard (Salt of the Earth) campaign against the Israeli plans to annex the Jordan valley, discussed during the current round of negotiation-talks between the PA and Israel, coordinated by John Kerry.

In the face of pledges by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu that he would not “uproot any Israeli citizen” from the West Bank and his insistence on retaining control of the Jordan Valley amid talks brokered by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, on January 31, hundreds of Palestinian activists began to occupy abandoned homes in a cluster of palm trees surrounded by land taken by Israeli settlers and military bases north of the Dead Sea.

The Ein Hijleh protest village was thus created, launching the Melh al-Ard (Salt of the Earth) campaign, organized by the Palestinian Popular Struggle Coordination Committee with the aim of “refusing the political status quo, especially given futile negotiations destroying the rights of our people for liberation and claim to their land.”

An Israeli military base sits between the protest village and the Deir Hijleh monastery, which owns about 1,000 dunams, some of which were taken by Israeli forces. Ein Hijleh itself stood on land owned by the Greek Orthodox Church, which granted permission for the activists to remain there for at least 30 days.

During the seven...

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Photos of the week: Palestinians return to Jordan Valley village

This week: African immigrants and Palestinian activists occupy protest camps to demand their rights; self-demolition in East Jerusalem; solidarity with hunger striker Samer Issawi; and Israeli authorities block Negev Bedouin agriculture and dump garbage in the West Bank.

African asylum seekers wake up in Levinsky Park, South Tel Aviv, on the second day of sit-in, February 3, 2013. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

African asylum seekers wake up in Levinsky Park, south Tel Aviv, on the second day of sit-in, February 3, 2013. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

African asylum seekers wake up in Levinsky Park, South Tel Aviv, on the second day of a sit-in after spending the night on the ground, February 3, 2013. The African community is continuing its struggle for refugee rights, determined to reach a full solution. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

African asylum seekers wake up in Levinsky Park, south Tel Aviv, on the second day of a sit-in after spending the night on the ground, February 3, 2013. The African community is continuing its struggle for refugee rights, determined to reach a full solution. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

African asylum seekers wait to board a bus of the Israeli immigration authority before leaving for Holot detention center, Tel Aviv, Israel, February 2 , 2014. The Israeli immigration authority summoned several dozen asylum seekers, ordering them to arrive at Holot detention center. Around 40 complied. According to human rights organizations, over 1,700 African asylum seekers received similar summons scheduled for the coming weeks, informing them that their current visa is cancelled. (photo: Yotam Ronen/Activestills.org)

African asylum seekers wait to board a bus of the Israeli immigration authority before leaving for Holot detention center, Tel Aviv, Israel, February 2 , 2014. The Israeli immigration authority summoned several dozen asylum seekers, ordering them to arrive at Holot detention center. Around 40 complied. According to human rights organizations, over 1,700 African asylum seekers received similar summons scheduled for the coming weeks, informing them that their current visa has been cancelled. (photo: Yotam Ronen/Activestills.org)

 

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PHOTOS: African asylum seekers renew protests with sit-in

Protest leaders vow to continue their struggle until a solution is found. Some 1,000 maintain sit-in at Levinsky Park.

Photos by: Oren Ziv, Tali Mayer, Keren Manor, Yotam Ronen / Activestills.org

African asylum seekers staging a sit-in at Levinsky park in Tel Aviv, protesting against the new detention center, calling to the Israeli government to recognize their refugee rights, February 2, 2014. (Activestills.org)

African asylum seekers staging a sit-in at Levinsky Park in Tel Aviv, protesting against the new detention center, calling to the Israeli government to recognize their refugee rights, February 2, 2014. (Activestills.org)

 

A renewed asylum seeker protest entered its fourth day on Wednesday as 1,000 African asylum seekers maintained a sit-in at south Tel Aviv’s Levinsky Park.

“The struggle didn’t stop,” Walla News cited Darfuri asylum seeker and protest leader Mutasim Ali as saying, “it will continue until there is a solution.”

Things are only getting worse for asylum seekers since the protests began, he explained, citing the large number who have been sent to Israel’s ‘Holot’ detention center. Others fear they too will soon be summoned.

Read also: Photo diary from inside Israel’s ‘Holot’ detention center

Acknowledging that change will not come overnight, Ali vowed, “we will continue until there is a solution, and it’s clear to us that there will be one.”

So asylum seekers will remain in Levinsky Park, he added, “and if necessary, we have big plans.”

The latest protest comes several weeks after tens of thousands of African asylum seekers took the streets to protest Israel’s policies toward them, namely indefinite detention and a refusal to individually examine most of their asylum claims.

Read: ‘The origins and politics of Israel’s refugee debate’
Read +972’s full coverage of asylum seekers in Israel

African asylum seekers staging a sit-in at Levinsky park in Tel Aviv, protesting against the new detention center, calling to the Israeli government to recognize their refugee rights, February 2, 2014. (Activestills.org)

African asylum seekers staging a sit-in at Levinsky Park in Tel Aviv, protesting against the new detention center, calling on the Israeli government to recognize their refugee rights, February 2, 2014. (Activestills.org)

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PHOTOS: In fight against the wall, does Cremisan have a prayer?

After more than two years of vigils by Palestinian Christians that gained widespread international attention, the Israeli High Court issued a preliminary order questioning the path of the separation barrier that would further divide West Bank land, cutting off the Cremisan monastery and a valley of olive groves.

Photos and text by: Ryan Rodrick Beiler/Activestills.org

Bethlehem-area Christians joined by local and international activists gather for a Catholic mass to protest the Israeli separation wall that will cut off Beit Jala's Cremisan monastery and winery from nearby West Bank communities, November 18, 2011.

Bethlehem-area Christians joined by local and international activists gather for a Catholic mass to protest the Israeli separation wall that will cut off Beit Jala’s Cremisan monastery and winery from nearby West Bank communities, November 18, 2011.

“What do we do? We pray,” said Father Ibrahim Shomali to the crowd assembled in an olive grove in the West Bank town of Beit Jala. “Because we believe in God and we believe that one day he will hear our prayer and he will give us justice.”

For more than two years, in sunshine, rain and even snow, Father Shomali, a local Catholic priest, has led a weekly mass as a form of non-violent witness against the Israeli separation barrier that threatens to divide the Cremisan monastery, as well as vast hillside olive groves, from the rest of the Beit Jala community. Father Shomali made this statement during the last vigil prior to an Israeli High Court hearing on January 29 to decide the barrier’s route.

November 18, 2011

November 18, 2011

Though organized by the local Palestinian Christian community, this unique protest has welcomed activists and community leaders of all faiths, as well as Palestinian government officials, international church leaders, diplomats and journalists. The story succeeded in reaching major media outlets including BBC and NPR, and was featured on CNN’s Christmas broadcast.

December 9, 2011

December 9, 2011

Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas devoted an entire paragraph of his 2013 Christmas speech to the issue, saying:

February 24, 2012

February 24, 2012

“What the church is doing is being...

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Photo diary: Inside Israel's 'Holot' detention center for asylum seekers

In December 2013 Israel began populating the Holot detention facility for African asylum seekers, first with those who were held in other prisons and gradually with those who were until now living in Tel Aviv and other Israeli cities. The detainees at Holot are being held there without charge until they can be deported or such a time as their asylum claims are processed, which for many detainees means indefinitely.

Ahmad, who asked that we not use his last name in order to protect him from retribution by prison authorities, escaped from Darfur five and a half years ago and has been living in Israel ever since. Like many other asylum seekers, he recently was given a summons to report to Holot. Faced with no other option, Ahmad boarded an immigration police bus and arrived there on Sunday, February 1, 2014.

Prison authorities are not allowing photographers or journalists inside the Holot prison facility. The following are photos Ahmad took inside the detention facility. We hope to update this photo blog whenever possible with images — and occasionally text — in order to show what life is like inside Holot.

Read +972′s full coverage of asylum seekers in Israel

Day 8, (Monday, February 9, 2014)

My bed, Holot, February 9, 2014. (Ahmad)

My bed, Holot, February 9, 2014. (Ahmad)

Food, Holot, February 9, 2014. (Ahmad)

Food, Holot, February 9, 2014. (Ahmad)

Day 4 (Wednesday, February 5, 2014) 

"Lunch" at Holot, Fifth day, February 5, 2014. (Ahmad)

“Lunch” at Holot, Fifth day, February 5, 2014. (Ahmad)

"Lunch" at Holot, Fifth day, February 5, 2014. (Ahmad)

“Lunch” at Holot, Fifth day, February 5, 2014. (Ahmad)

Day 3 (Tuesday, February 4, 2014)

“My friend from Darfur was singing a song on the Long Walk for Freedom, to strengthen us. The situation here is very bad.”

My friend singing a freedom song, February 4, 2014. (Ahmad)

My friend singing a freedom song, February 4, 2014. (Ahmad)

A view in Holot, February 4, 2014. (Ahmad)
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PHOTOS: Palestinians establish new protest village in Jordan Valley

Some 300 Palestinian activists descended on a cluster of palm trees and long-abandoned houses north of the Dead Sea on Friday to establish the protest village of ‘Ein Hijleh.’ The aim of the action was to protest demands made by the Israeli government to retain control of the Jordan Valley and other settlements in the midst of current peace negotiations. The action is the first in a campaign of protest villages activists termed ‘Melh Al-Ard’ (Salt of the Earth). 

By: Oren Ziv, Ryan Rodrick Beiler, Keren Manor/Activestills.org

Palestinian activists arrive to Ein Hijleh protest village, in the Jordan Valley, West Bank January 31, 2014.

Palestinian activists arrive to the Ein Hijleh protest village, in the Jordan Valley, West Bank January 31, 2014.

Palestinian activists shout slogans upon arrival to Ein Hijleh protest village, in the Jordan Valley, West Bank January 31, 2014.

Palestinian activists shout slogans upon arrival to Ein Hijleh protest village, in the Jordan Valley, West Bank January 31, 2014. (Activestills.org)

Haaretz reported earlier this month that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu said he “did not intend to uproot any Israeli citizen” from the West Bank and doubled down on his insistence to hold onto the Jordan Valley amid peace talks brokered by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry.

According to the Popular Struggle Coordinating Committee, which organized the action in Ein Hijleh:

Last year, Palestinian activists erected a massive protest village named Bab al-Shams in the E1 area near Jerusalem to protest the threat of Israeli settlements and annexation there. A month later, activists built a shorter-lived protest village named Al-Manatir, near the West Bank village of Burin.

Palestinian activists celebrate as they arrive to Ein Hijleh protest village, in the Jordan Valley, West Bank January 31, 2014.

Palestinian activists celebrate as they arrive to Ein Hijleh protest village, in the Jordan Valley, West Bank January 31, 2014. (Activestills.org)

A Palestinian activist hangs the Palestinian flag on palm tree, in Ein Hijleh protest village, in the Jordan Valley, West Bank January 31, 2014.

A Palestinian activist hangs the Palestinian flag on palm tree,...

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Home Field: Visiting agricultural workers in Israel, part 3

In a series of posts based on field visits and meetings with migrant workers in Israel, Noa Shauer and Shiraz Grinbaum highlight the conditions, hardships and exploitation of foreign workers. In part 3, agricultural workers in Moshav Yavetz suffer harsh neglect, are stripped of their right to decent pay and live in insufferable conditions.

Read part 2 here, and part 1 here

Text: Noa Shauer/Kav LaOved, Photos: Shiraz Grinbaum/Activestills.org

A Thai agriculture worker, sitting on his bed inside a shipping container, used as the group's residency, Moshav Yavetz, January 25.1.2014. (Shiraz Grinbaum/Activestills.org)

A Thai agricultural worker sitting on his bed inside a shipping container, which serves as the group’s residence, Moshav Yavetz, January 25.1.2014. (Shiraz Grinbaum/Activestills.org)

We arrived at Moshav Yavetz following a request submitted by workers on the ‘Kav LaOved – Workers’ Hotline’ Facebook page. The workers wrote about their poor living conditions and asked us to come for a visit. We traveled to see their living quarters using side roads, through the moshav’s orchards and greenhouses, in order not to attract the attention of its residents.

Upon arrival, we saw a temporary structure with a beautiful yard fenced with bamboo sticks. Initially we were happy that these were the workers’ quarters, but quickly learned that they belonged to the family members of a moshav farmer. We asked the workers about the relationship with their neighbors and they said there is absolutely no relationship, and that the has family instructed their children to keep away from the Thai workers’ residence. About 20 meters away stood a shipping container. “So that is where the workers are housed,” we said as we gazed, disappointed.

Thongchai Peakuna, an agricultural Thai worker, stands inside a shipping container used as the group's residency, Moshav Yavetz, January 25.1.2014

Thongchai Peakuna, an agricultural Thai worker, stands inside a shipping container used as the group’s residence, Moshav Yavetz, January 25.1.2014

Terms of employment

During the visit we met 20 workers, most of whom lived in the container (along with some from the neighboring villages). The workers told us that they earn NIS 140 for eight working hours and NIS 20 for each overtime hour. They work between 8-10 hours a day, and only recently did their pay get bumped up from NIS 130. The workers say that due...

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Photos of the week: Palestinians, asylum seekers find themselves homeless

This week: Asylum seekers in the Holot detention center, leftist teachers protest political persecution, vegans march in Tel Aviv, West Bank protesters clash with Israeli soldiers, and East Jerusalem families find themselves homeless.

An African asylum seeker sits inside a bus of the Israeli immigration authority before leaving to Holot detention center, Tel Aviv, Israel, The Israeli immigration authority summoned a few dozens asylum seekers ordering them to arrive today to Holot detention center Only 12 arrived. According to human rights organizations, over 1700 African asylum seekers received similar summons scheduled for the coming weeks, informing them that their current visa is cancelled. (photo: Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

An African asylum seeker sits inside a bus of the Israeli immigration authority before leaving to Holot detention center, Tel Aviv, Israel, The Israeli immigration authority summoned a few dozens asylum seekers ordering them to arrive today to Holot detention center Only 12 arrived. According to human rights organizations, over 1700 African asylum seekers received similar summons scheduled for the coming weeks, informing them that their current visa is cancelled. (photo: Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

 

Asylum seekers living in Tel Aviv and Israeli activists hold a solidarity visit outside Holot detention center, bringing food and clothing, January 25, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Asylum seekers living in Tel Aviv and Israeli activists hold a solidarity visit outside Holot detention center, bringing food and clothing, January 25, 2014. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

 

Afghan asylum seekers protect themselves from the cold in tents, inside the Beguinage Church used as a temporary shelter in the city center of Brussels, Belgium, January 23, 2014. Some 200 Afghan asylum seekers, including women and children, live in the church in difficult conditions. They have been protesting for months demanding asylum. (photo: Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

Afghan asylum seekers protect themselves from the cold in tents, inside the Beguinage Church used as a temporary shelter in the city center of Brussels, Belgium, January 23, 2014. Some 200 Afghan asylum seekers, including women and children, live in the church in difficult conditions. They have been protesting for months demanding asylum. (photo: Anne Paq/Activestills.org)

 

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Photos of the week: Asylum seekers, LGBT activists hit the streets

This week: solidarity with asylum seekers, animal rights activism, denouncing against attacks on transgender people, return of Palestinian militants’ remains, tear gas in Aida Camp, military training in the Jordan Valley, Palestinian steadfastness in Khirbet Makhoul, protests against medical privatization, and weekly demonstrations against the occupation.

African asylum seekers preform during a cultural solidarity event in the Shafa Bar, Jaffa, January 19, 2014. Thirty bars, restaurants and clubs in Tel Aviv took part in cultural solidarity events in which African culture was celebrated with the African asylum seekers community in Israel. Most of the venues employ African asylum seekers in maintenance work. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

African asylum seekers preform during a cultural solidarity event in the Shafa Bar, Jaffa, January 19, 2014. Thirty bars, restaurants and clubs in Tel Aviv took part in cultural solidarity events in which African culture was celebrated with the African asylum seekers community in Israel. Most of the venues employ African asylum seekers in maintenance work. (photo: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

Israeli LGTBQ activist hold sign reads: "We are dying from fear (of others)" during a protest against hate crimes, Tel Aviv, Israel, January 16, 2014. The protest was held following an attack on a transgender sex worker two weeks ago in Tel Aviv by 11 men with pepper spray and electric shockers. After their arrest by the police it was found that all 11 are border policemen, who committed the assault off duty. Police officials called the assault a "prank" fuelled by "boredom". Local activists see it as a hate crime, one of many committed against transgender people in Israel. (photo: Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

Israeli LGTBQ activist hold sign reads: “We are dying from fear (of others)” during a protest against hate crimes, Tel Aviv, Israel, January 16, 2014. The protest was held following an attack on a transgender sex worker two weeks ago in Tel Aviv by 11 men with pepper spray and electric shockers. After their arrest by the police it was found that all 11 are border policemen, who committed the assault off duty. Police officials called the assault a “prank” fuelled by “boredom”. Local activists see it as a hate crime, one of many committed against transgender people in Israel. (photo: Keren Manor/Activestills.org)

 

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Portraits: Detained African asylum seekers in Israel

The faces and stories of African asylum seekers indefinitely detained at ‘Holot,’ Israel’s new ‘open’ prison.

Project by: Oren Ziv/Activestills.org, Hotline for Refugees and Migrants

Detainees at the Holot ‘open’ prison. (Photo by Oren Ziv/Activestills.org)

This portrait series was taken outside of the Holot prison for African asylum seekers in Israel’s Negev desert. Israeli authorities refer to Holot as an ‘open facility’ because its detainees can leave for a few hours at a time. Prior to their transfer to Holot on December 12 and 13, 2013, all the subjects photographed were held under administrative detention in the “Saharonim” and “Ketsiot” Israeli prisons for periods of more then 18 months. Under current Israeli law, their only hope for release is if they agree to be deported back to their home countries, from which they fled.

The prison currently holds several hundred asylum seekers from Sudan and Eritrea, many of whom are victims of torture, kidnapping and trafficking through the Sinai desert. Holot is jointly run by the Israeli Prison Service and Interior Ministry and has strict rules and regulations, all of which carry severe punishments including transfer to other prisons. The Israeli government has publicized plans to expand Holot to hold more then 3,000 asylum seekers by the end of the year. The Interior Ministry has begun issuing summons to asylum seekers in Tel Aviv, ordering them to present themselves at Holot within 30 days.

These are their stories in their own words.

Read +972′s full coverage of African asylum seekers in Israel

Araya Fishazion

I am 19 years old. In 2012 I escaped from Eritrea to Ethiopia. I stayed there in a refugee camp for a month. From there I continued to Sudan and arrived to Sinai with a group of people. I paid $3,500 (to smugglers) and entered to Israel on June 4, 2012. Everyone else who arrived with me was released in June 2012.

Araya Fishazion, from Eritrea, 1.5 years in Saharonim prison.

 

G.H.I.Y

I am 22 years old, born in Gezira, Sudan. I have been imprisoned for a year and three months. I don’t know why. My brother is a political activist with the opposition group fighting...

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PHOTOS: Tel Aviv protest denounces violence against transgender people

Photos and report by: Oren Ziv and Keren Manor/Activestills.org

Approximately 1,000 transgender and LGBTQ activists marched Thursday night along the streets of Tel Aviv to protest transphobic hate crimes. The protest, organized by “Gila – Project for Trans Empowerment,” was held following an attack on a trans sex worker two weeks ago in Tel Aviv by eleven men with pepper spray and electric shockers. After their arrest, it was revealed that all eleven were off-duty border policemen. Police officials called the assault a “prank” fueled by “boredom.”

The protesters marched in the streets of Tel Aviv, denouncing homophobia and hate crimes and reclaiming their right to respect, protection and justice.

Around 238 trans persons, mostly women, were murdered in 2013 around the world because of their gender variance. Every six hours a trans person is attacked. Many of the victims also report that humiliation and attacks continue while under police interrogation.

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+972 is an independent, blog-based web magazine. It was launched in August 2010, resulting from a merger of a number of popular English-language blogs dealing with life and politics in Israel and Palestine.

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