Pediatrics Archives

Allergia Phototherapy Device for Hayfever Showed Positive Results in Pilot Trial

Allergia1 Allergia Phototherapy Device for Hayfever Showed Positive Results in Pilot Trial

Hay fever, clinically known as seasonal allergenic rhinitis, is normally treated with meds. But they all have potential side effects and their optimal effectiveness can be lacking for many people. A new device from a company just coming out of stealth mode hopes to change that completely.

The Allergia device from Allergia Medical delivers bright light into the nostril with the hope of stopping the sneezing, congestion, and runny nose that plaques allergy sufferers. So far the device has been tested in a pilot study with 14 patients at the Asthma and Allergy Center of Chicago. The device was used for only six seconds per nostril per day, resulting in a 31% improvement in patients’ Total Nasal Symptom Score (TNSS) versus the baseline, while no side effects were observed. Moreover, “results superior to antihistamines” were recorded.

The image shows the prototype used in the study, but the company tells Medgadget that the final device will be improved further. Here are the mechanisms that Allergia Medical believes underlie their photodynamic therapy device:

  • Reactive oxygen species in blood are suppressed after illumination possibly as a result of activation of superoxide dismutase or of catalase
  • Visible and IR light cause changes in Ca2+ transport
  • Allergic symptoms are largely dependent on oxygen radical formation and Ca2+ mobility
  • Suppresses the effector phase
  • Results in inhibition of histamine release and activity of neutrophils, eosinophils and mast cells

Link: Allergia Medical’s homepage…

CardioTrack for Cheap 3-Lead ECG Recording Anywhere

CardioTrack for Cheap 3-Lead ECG Recording Anywhere

Basic diagnostic equipment can be hard to access in poor regions of the world, preventing the saving of countless lives from easily treatable conditions. A new company, uber Diagnostics out of Bangalore, India, is hoping to offer its portable ECG device to medically under-served areas to allow just about anyone with basic training to record electrocardiograms.

The CardioTrack is a 3-lead ECG with recording and networking capabilities, designed to separate the tasks of taking an ECG and interpreting it between a trained clinician and a cardiologist. The device is used much like a regular ECG unit, but there is no screen or printer that provides the readout. Instead, the data is sent wirelessly to the “cloud” from where it can be viewed and analyzed remotely by a physician. Additionally, the device provides its own waveform analysis, and can issue a warning if it detects a signature of a cardiac condition. The company hopes to bring the cost of 3-lead ECG exams down to less than $0.50, helping save lives of people without disposable income.

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Dario All-in-One Smarphone-Connected Glucometer Going on Sale in Select Markets

Dario All-in-One Smarphone-Connected Glucometer Going on Sale in Select Markets

LabStyle Innovations, a Caesarea, Israel firm, is finally making available its highly anticipated smartphone-connected glucose monitor. The Dario device includes the lancet and test strips within its body, and the actual glucose meter pops off the main unit and is connected to the smartphone’s audio jack.

The glucometer works with a smartphone app (currently available for iOS) that stores sugar readings, provides historical charts, predicts A1C (glycated hemoglobin), and helps keep track of food intake. All the data can be reviewed on the app itself or through a website portal. The same portal can be used to give access to a physician or caretaker, to help keep tabs on sugar levels and suggest lifestyle changes.

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Timesulin for Easy Tracking of Insulin Pen Injections

Timesulin for Easy Tracking of Insulin Pen Injections

People with diabetes living on insulin injections have to keep track of when to take every dose. This can be a challenge, leading many folks to forget injections that can lead to dangerous hypoglycemia. Some people carry timers, use apps on their phones, and others just use their “internal chronometers” to remember to take injections in relation to what they’ve been eating that day. Now a product that’s been available in Europe for a couple years to help simplify tracking of injections is about to come to the U.S. thanks to an Indiegogo crowdfunding campaign.

The Timesulin is a replacement cap for many insulin pens currently being used by diabetics that simply displays how much time passed since the last injection. It features a sensor that detects when the cap is removed and starts a clock on the face of the cap that shows the time elapsed. There are no buttons on the device and there’s nothing to do except to snap it onto the insulin pen to activate it. There’s also no timer built-in, which the developers explain would be nearly useless since food consumption changes when injections are best taken and most people don’t take them at set times anyways.

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Microneedle Patches Allow for Self Administering of Flu Vaccine

Microneedle Patches Allow for Self Administering of Flu Vaccine

Annual flu vaccinations have become a regular chore for a lot of people, while the fear of needles has kept quite a few people away. An easier way of getting vaccinated would help get more people to participate.

Researchers at Georgia Tech, Emory University, and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, have tested a new patch that allows just about anyone to deliver a flu vaccine in the privacy of their home. The microneedle array consists of 50 tiny needles that inject the vaccine into skin where the immune reaction begins. The team compared self administration to a professional applying the patch, and also against traditional syringe delivery. Though there was no actual vaccine involved in the trial, the study examined how well each patch penetrated the skin surface and whether it would be an effective delivery option for self delivery of vaccine.  Here are some results from the study:

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Puritan Bennett 980 Ventilator with Proportional Assist Ventilation Plus Tech Cleared in U.S.

Puritan Bennett 980 Ventilator with Proportional Assist Ventilation Plus Tech Cleared in U.S.

The FDA has cleared Covidien‘s Puritan Bennett 980 Ventilator  for use with neonatal patients, children, and adults. The device features Proportional Assist Ventilation Plus (PAV+) technology licensed from University of Manitoba in Canada that provides smarter pumping to optimally synchronize with every patient. This will hopefully allow many patients to get off the ventilator earlier, something studies of proportional-assist ventilation have already indicated.

“We believe mechanical ventilation should be natural enough to enable patients to breathe on their own more quickly,” said James E. Willett, vice president and general manager, Respiratory Solutions, Covidien. “The Puritan Bennett 980 ventilator provides clinicians with a simple, safe and smart way to care for patients.”

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Masimo Pulse Oximeter Now Available for Android

Masimo Pulse Oximeter Now Available for Android

About a year ago, Masimo introduced its pulse oximetry technology to the mobile market by releasing the iSpO2 device. It works with the iPhone to display live oxygen saturation (SpO2), pulse rate (PR), and perfusion index data using the same fingertip light sensor found on hospital systems. Now the company is releasing an Android compatible iSpO2 pulse oximeter that plugs into the micro USB port.

Companion software can be downloaded from the Google Play Store that in addition to displaying live readings, offers sharing options, and stores data for later review.

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West Intradermal Adapter Helps Guarantee Proper Intradermal Injections Every Time (VIDEO)

West Intradermal Adapter Helps Guarantee Proper Intradermal Injections Every Time (VIDEO)

West Pharmaceutical (Exton, PA) won the European CE Mark for its Intradermal Adapter, a device used to help make intradermal injections safer, easier, and more consistent. It’s designed for use with 1 mL disposable syringes, and is particularly beneficial for doing Mantoux tests for tuberculosis screening and allergy identifications.

The clip-on device sits around the syringe’s 1/2 inch long needle and prevents its penetration past the intradermal layer. The adapter has been cleared a year ago by the FDA in the U.S. and the company has conducted a couple clinical studies of the device, reporting that they showed “a strong clinician preference for the ID adapter.”

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BleepBleeps Announces Digital Health Solution for Easier Parenting [INTERVIEW]

BleepBleeps Announces Digital Health Solution for Easier Parenting [INTERVIEW]

Over the past few years we’ve seen smartphone-based weight scales, activity monitors, and blood pressure cuffs go mainstream. It seems that at least a couple new devices enter the marketplace every week. One of the most intriguing entrants recently is BleepBleeps, the brainchild of UK-designer Tom Evans. The company just launched a Kickstarter to fund the first of their “little friends:” Sammy Screamer, a motion alarm. We had the opportunity to interview Tom after meeting him at the World Innovation Summit on Health in Qatar and then again at CES.

Shiv Gaglani, Medgadget: What exactly are BleepBleeps?

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