Ophthalmology Archives

FluidVision Accomodating Lens Implant Automatically Adjusts Focus of Eye

FluidVision FluidVision Accomodating Lens Implant Automatically Adjusts Focus of Eye
A number of eye conditions can make a person to lose the ability to change the shape of the lens, also known as loss of accommodation. People with presbyopia and those that get traditional intraocular lenses for cataracts suffer from this frustrating condition. A new lens developed by PowerVision, a company out of Belmont, California, aims to restore the eye’s ability to focus by changing its shape much like a natural one.

The FluidVision implant harnesses the natural forces the eye produces to move fluid in and out of its lens. This allows the lens to change its thickness and so its refractive power. The device is implanted using the same techniques as any other intraocular lens and the first cataract patients in an initial trial are now beginning to get the implant.

This prevents the eye from being able to focus on objects at different distances.

Product page: FluidVision…

Stanford Scientists Unveil Two Ophthalmology Smartphone Adapters

Stanford Scientists Unveil Two Ophthalmology Smartphone Adapters

Researchers at Stanford University have developed two new smartphone attachments that allow imaging of the eye that would normally done with large, bulky instruments. Ophthalmologists imaging the anterior segment of the eye (cornea, iris, ciliary body, lens) use slit lamp instruments that shine a bright flat beam of light onto the eye in combination with a microscope. There already exist attachments for slit lamps that allow a smartphone to snap on and be used to capture and share images of the eye, but the slit lamp is still a bulky instrument.

The team developed a small iPhone attachment that snaps onto just about any smartphone to visualize the anterior segment. It consists of a small lens and an LED just next to it and is small enough to fit in your pocket. It’s positioned close to the eye, focused, and an image is taken. In a study published in Journal of Mobile Technology in Medicine they report that the device “satisfactorily portrays a wide range of pathology of the eyelids, conjunctiva, cornea, iris, and lens without the need for a slitlamp.”

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OphtaCath Lacrimal Duct Balloon Catheter Now Available in U.S. for Epiphora Treatment

OphtaCath Lacrimal Duct Balloon Catheter Now Available in U.S. for Epiphora Treatment

The FDA issued approval to FCI Ophthalmics (Pembroke, MA) for the OphtaCath lacrimal duct balloon catheter, a device used to dilate the lacrimal duct for treatment of epiphora, or excessive tears in the eyes.

Available in 2mm or 3mm sizes, and a delivery device that uses one or two balloon catheters, the OphtaCath provides an incisionless and tube-free option for epiphora treatment. The semi-flexible balloon retains its shape memory before and after inflation and the inflation device allows for precise control of pressure delivered to the balloon.  The balloon is made of a high strength material that resists bursting even at high pressures.

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New High Speed Eye Scanner Helps Identify Retinal Diseases

New High Speed Eye Scanner Helps Identify Retinal Diseases

Eye conditions like glaucoma and macular degeneration are best treated when spotted early, but often they go undiagnosed until symptoms appear because the instruments used to detect them are in an ophthalmologist’s office, not your primary care physician’s. A team at MIT has developed a hand-held device that can quickly, and with a single scan, help detect a variety of retinal conditions.

The device performs high-speed optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging using an infrared light source and tiny 2D mirror, creating a high-resolution 3D image of the retina. The system also automatically corrects for eye movement, effectively freezing the eye during the scan for a focused, streak-free result. Thought the essential technology inside the scanner has existed for years, and table-top systems have allowed diagnosis of retinal diseases by specialists, the new scanner may allow for population-wide screening of eye diseases.

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Drug Dispensing Contact Lenses Replacing Eye Drops in Glaucoma Treatment?

Drug Dispensing Contact Lenses Replacing Eye Drops in Glaucoma Treatment?

The doctor is always curious whether you have been taking your medication, and some drugs are more difficult to administer than others. Numerous ways have already been put to practice to ensure medication compliance, but now another innovation is significantly closer to practical realization: drug-eluting contact lenses to ensure prolonged delivery of anti-glaucoma eye drops. Glaucoma is a disease in which an elevated intraocular pressure causes damage to the eye, resulting in visual field loss, sometimes progressing to blindness. Treatment mainly relies on lowering the eye pressure and certain eye drops, such as the latanoprost, can lower the eye pressure. The results of a study by a team from Massachusetts Eye and Ear testing the newly developed contacts will be published in Biomaterials in January, but are already available online.

The new contact lenses contain encapsulated latanoprost-polymer films and were tested in vivo on rabbits. The team was able to achieve latanoprost concentrations in the aqueous humor, comparable with daily latanoprost eye drops. The drug-polymer film is located in the periphery of the contact lens, ensuring a clear view through the centre of the lens. The lenses can also be used by traditional contacts wearers to correct nearsightedness or farsightedness.

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Recreational Photos Reveal Early Stages of Retinoblastoma

Recreational Photos Reveal Early Stages of Retinoblastoma

A modern child growing up in today’s gadget-filled world is photographed nearly all day long by parents who must capture every precious moment that time would otherwise eat up. Conveniently, a basic camera with a flash can also help spot retinoblastoma, a malignant cancer that, like others, is easier to treat if diagnosed early. Professional screenings for the disease are rare, and it’s been known for a while that ”white eye” showing up in flash photos, also known as leukocoria, is indicative of advanced retinoblastoma. Yet, using personal photos hasn’t been seriously considered as a screening option for early detection of the disease.

Bryan F. Shaw, a chemistry and biochemistry professor at Baylor’s College of Arts & Sciences, and his wife noticed leukocoria in the photos of his son, which followed with a diagnosis of retinoblastoma. Shaw followed to see whether this could be a systematic way to screen children, and assembled a team that went through 7,000 photos of eighteen kids with and without the disease that were provided by the parents. They discovered that even photos days after birth can show signs of leukocoria that can be indicative of retinoblastoma and that the frequency of white eye is linked to the disease’s progression. Moreover, the visual characteristics of the eye can be measured and turn out to be correlated to the true intensity of leukocoria.

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KXL II from Avedro for Non-Surgical Correction of Myopia

KXL II from Avedro for Non-Surgical Correction of Myopia

Avedro (Boston, MA) received CE Mark clearance in Europe for its KXL II System that’s used for Accelerated Cross-linking and PiXL (Photorefractive Intrastromal Cross-linking) procedures for treatment of myopia. From the announcement:

“As one of the first KXL II clinical sites, we experienced the amazing capabilities of customized accelerated cross-linking to achieve specific, reproducible and interim-stable refractive changes on the cornea,” said A. John Kanellopoulos, MD, NYU Medical School and Member of Avedro’s Medical Advisory Board. “It seems to me that every surgeon who has performed cross-linking has experienced refractive corneal changes. We now have a way to design and customize these refractive changes. If these initial clinical results continue to be repeated, as I believe they will, the potential seems unlimited.”

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Leica Unveils Surgical Microscopes with Built-In TrueVision 3D Technology

Leica Unveils Surgical Microscopes with Built-In TrueVision 3D Technology

Surgical microscopes now offer 3D capabilities, but to see the images one had to use a separate cart with a 3D screen and related equipment on it. Now Leica Microsystems is releasing a couple new microscopes with with TrueVision (Santa Barbara, CA) 3D technology built right in.

The new Leica M720 OH5 and Leica M525 OH4 models stream both 2D and 3D video to other displays, features a small footprint and an ergonomic design, and, of course, legendary Leica optics.

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New Superpixel Imaging of the Optic Disc to Allow Screening of Population for Glaucoma

New Superpixel Imaging of the Optic Disc to Allow Screening of Population for Glaucoma

Glaucoma is a progressive eye disease that eventually causes blindness and has no true cure. Yet, early detection of glaucoma offers options to slow down its development, but too many people notice symptoms much too late for effective therapy. Intraocular pressure sensing is currently the go-to method, but it’s not effective for screening the general public before any symptoms are reported.

Scientists at A*STAR Institute for Infocomm Research in Singapore have developed a new method that utilizes high resolution imaging of the optic disk (optic nerve head) to detect the elongation of the optic cup, an area in the center of the disk, which usually happens before any noticeable changes in vision are noticed by someone with early stage glaucoma. The system involves automatic superpixel segmentation of the image into tiny quadrants and detection of the area of the cup and the disk. The ratio between the vertical heights of the two turns out to correlate pretty well with confirmed glaucoma diagnoses. As importantly, the system is small and cheap enough to be used to screen entire populations and help a lot more people live longer with healthy vision.

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