FORUM: Post Your Radiation Monitoring Data Here

Published: December 4th, 2012 at 12:00 am ET
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Previous radiation monitoring thread here: http://enenews.com/forum-post-radiation-monitoring-data-dec-17-2011-present

Published: December 4th, 2012 at 12:00 am ET
By
Email Article Email Article
8,368 comments

Related Posts

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  2. FORUM: Methods for combating radiation and its effects September 1, 2012
  3. FORUM: What should be done about Japan burning radioactive debris? September 1, 2012
  4. FORUM: Fukushima Webcam Discussion Thread December 27, 2013
  5. FORUM: Off-Topic Discussion Thread (Non-Nuclear Issues) for Mar. 25, 2014 – Present February 1, 2013

8,368 comments to FORUM: Post Your Radiation Monitoring Data Here

  • vital1

    Australia.
    Queensland,
    Sunshine Coast,
    April 2014 Southern Hemisphere Background Radiation Report

    Summary:

    April 2014 was 22% above the pre-Fukushima average. April 2012 was 10% above, and April 2013 was 13% above the pre-Fukushima average.

    In the colder months I see a drop in background here, as most of the prevailing winds are from the Southern Ocean. The drop for April 2014 was less than April 2012 and 2013.

    Technical details:

    Monitoring Station Location

    http://sccc.org.au/monitoring/Australian-Map.jpg

    April 2014 was 22% above the 4 year pre-Fukushima April average.

    http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/Caloundra-local-average-background-radiation-levels-April-2014.jpg

    2014 month average chart.

    http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/Caloundra-monthly-average-background-radiation-levels-for-2014.jpg

    April 2013 was 9% above the pre-Fukushima month average.

    http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/Caloundra-monthly-average-background-radiation-levels-for-2013.jpg

    April 2012 was 12% above the pre-Fukushima month average.

    http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/09/Caloundra-monthly-average-background-radiation-levels-for-2012.jpg

    More long term data and reports can be found here,

    http://sccc.org.au/archives/2630


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  • aigeezer aigeezer

    Just did the annual battery change on my PRM8000. Elapsed time 395 days this time, max reading 34 CPM, min 1 CPM, average 13 CPM. My readings are always consistent and average results are self-similar at any time scale so far after two years and two months running the unit – boring is good, in this case. My detailed readings are available 24/7 on the radiation network. My station is in NS, Canada, a long long way from Fukushima but uncomfortably close to the Point Lepreau nuke plant in NB, Canada.


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    • * About the same here, airgeezer –allowing for the difference in the count rates of our Geiger counters –and per the link off of my name.

      * Roughly, and with Cs-137 at 10uR/hr assumed, the LND-712 G-M tube in your PRM-8000 runs about 10cpm, an SBM-20 tube runs about 15cpm, and the two M4011 tubes here (one of which is retrofitted into my Inspector GC) –click away at about 16cpm.

      * While I don't have readings previous to 3/11/2011, I did start data logging on 3/17/2011. I may have had a 40% bump on 3/22/2011 and a questionable 75% bump on 12/1/2011 –but the rest of the 3 years looks pretty tame –thankfully.

      * Like most private stations, my outside Geiger counter amounts to "ground reading", which might detect accumulations of fall-out or some other increase above the normal background level. I supplement the daily reading with on-the-beach readings (okay so far) and occasional 40 cubic meter air filter draws (never detecting residuals).

      * I've recently been joined by one other station on the Oregon coast. For "the record", we're it –!

      * Along with other private coastal stations from Mexico through Canada and Alaska, and given the prevailing winds, one would think our numbers to be an indication of what's reaching us from Japan.

      * In the 3+ years, I'm not aware that any official or professional has taken notice of my data. I wonder if anyone outside our 3 private networks has made use of or reference to our data.


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    • jcfougere jcfougere

      Where are you located in NS? I hail from Halifax.


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  • Sparky Sparky

    Fresno, CA EPA RadNet readings, "pulse" pattern? I posted this msg. to the NETC member forum, but am cross-posting here for NETC chart members as well. (Thanks to any chart member who can pull/post graphical chart as I don't do "dropbox" or similar.)

    "…I'm requesting some additional perspective from NETC users/members on a pattern that emerges from the two-month and one-month graphical summary for Fresno's EPA monitor. Specifically, I've noticed that the readings seem to peak with uncanny regularity between the hours of roughly 7 a.m. – 9:30 a.m. (+/- 30 min. or so). This may suggest regular "pulses" of [Gamma 5] radiation–perhaps from a medical or industrial facility? There are no NPPs in the immediate area, but there well may be rads from LLNL, Diablo NPP or other radiation sites carried on the Jet Stream. However, IMO the pattern suggests a more local source.

    Unfortunately, NETC appears to smooth-out this time-specific level of detail when averaging beyond the 2-month/1 hr. time increments.

    There are many more knowledgeable and experienced folks here on NETC [and Enenews] that I am hoping can weigh-in on the Fresno anomaly. Thanks!!"


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    • Hi Sparky.

      I'm responding not as an expert, but because I've several times noticed and wondered about periodic peaks in RadNet graphs.

      One publicly accessible graph is at Greg's site:
      > http://www.gregslab.com/tools/radwatch/details/920
      –where we can see the same +/-10% periodicity. It looks a lot more pronounced on the NETC chart because Harlan's program selects Y axis values closer to the actual range.

      * Possibly, this morning thing is about a ventilation system turning on up-wind or in the same building –purging a lot of radon from the basement. But maybe it's something more like exhausting a messy lab or a medical imaging facility in the area –or freeway traffic just 2 blocks west.

      Gosh: you can zoom right down to that RadNet station on (3020?) East Washington Avenue and look around –at a humble 6 unit apartment, graffiti, laundry on the line, "For Rent" signs. –Hmmnnnn: is there any maintenance on that station?

      * NETC graphs only the 600 to 800 kev energy channel, whereas Greg adds up all the channels, so sometimes their graphs don't look alike. Greg's graph should look more like that of a private station's Geiger counter data, since a G-M tube's response is pretty much spectrum wide –the LND-7317 tube (Inspector, PRM-9000) having good low end response as well. (Those spec sheet graphs stop at 1.2 mev because that was the top end of the test setup –IMO and from my questioning of others.)


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      • Sparky Sparky

        Craig-123, thanks for your insightful response. I like the Greg's Lab site, but don't check it as frequently (and therefore I'm not as familiar with) the NETC site. Until we have one, comprehensive, accurate, trustworthy and reliable rad monitoring site, I think it’s good to at least try to become familiar with several sites (e.g., NETC, Greg's Lab, RadNet, BlackCatSystems) and their data collection/presention methods, in the US and elsewhere. I'm still working on that. ;-)

        A while ago I checked into the radon angle, including a radon map that suggested radon was not likely a contributing factor. A few months ago I took my GMC-300E on the road and as I drove from down south through the Central Valley along Hwy. 99, through Fresno and further up north beyond. CPM were pretty typical of what I get at my Turlock NETC site, about 18-23 CPM, except when I drove by a neon sign shop in Fresno, when the rads went to about 32 or slightly higher, as I recall.

        There are LOTS of medical facilities in the area, however, so I think your periodic "venting" theory is very plausible. I'm planning to drive to those areas, do a walk-about, walk-in to those facilities over the summer.

        RE: specific location of the EPA Fresno RadNet monitor, I'm never sure whether the visual on GoogleMaps is actual or approximate to the address EPA provides. When I'm better armed with information, I'll contact Fresno area EPA.

        Thanks much, C-123. I'll keep all posted here.


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  • VanneV VanneV

    List of RADCON-5 sites:
    4:802 near Salt Lake City, UT, US 149 2014-05-03 15:04:00 A


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    • VanneV VanneV

      254 CPM
      NETC.COM © 2014
      Station ID 5:802 Salt Lake City, UT, US
      Click here for data charts
      CPM: current 254 Low 181 High 402
      Average 216, Deviation 20.8
      (CPM of Gamma in energy range 600-800keV)

      Last updated: 2014-05-03 15:04:00 GMT+0000


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      • califnative califnative

        Radcon5 Alert Arkansas:

        108 CPM
        NETC.COM © 2014
        Station ID 1:EB420089 Gurdon, AR, US
        Click here for data charts
        CPM: current 108 Low 6 High 154
        Average 24, Deviation 11.7
        Average over last 10 minutes: 97

        Outside Unit#1 with PI and GMC-300
        Last updated: 2014-05-04 22:35:55 GMT+0000


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  • califnative califnative

    Craig-123 I now live in Tucson AZ and use a Radex RD1212 that measures uSv/h Gamma & Beta (not CPM) if I recall you mentioned you have one too? The average reading I get here is 0.14-0.16 (with background) and I'm not sure how to convert it to CPM.

    I looked at this link and saw this: 120 CPM on the meter (for Cs137) is about 1 uSv/hr (microSievert per hour)
    http://modernsurvivalblog.com/nuclear/radiation-geiger-counter-the-radiation-network/

    I'd like to post my readings here once in a while, especially since yesterday when the NETC map was all lit up. At few times it spiked to 0.26! and the threshold is 0.30 uSv/h. There where green military helicopters (with a long pole at the front) circling about four times in the morning, one buzzed right over the house and I could see inside it was that close. The neighbors said it was unusual, they had to have been monitoring the air for radiation. I told the neighbors about NETC and Enenews, they had clue. Anyway, if you see this message can you help me figure out how to convert the Radex 1212 readings? Really appreciate you, Sparky and VanneV (and others) for all your knowledgeable comments here. It's hard going this nightmare alone and the people here are the only ones I can share this with.

    Thank you!


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    • Au Au

      A green military helicopter, with propellers on each end, went over our neighborhood too(SE Michigan). I ran out to see what type it was and saw it from behind. I wonder if it had a long pole on the front too? Very unusual to see that and it was also low. It was flying direction east.


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    • The RD1212 is a really interesting and affordable device. I don't own one, but I downloaded manuals for it (September of last year). The literature is not very helpful about specifications. (Time to check for something newer, and I'll get back on what turns up.)

      * The important thing is that it data logs, works with your computer, & makes graphs(?) The software seemed rather simple last checked it out.

      * The downsides of the RD1212 are: no CPMs, no uR/hr option, and only the one built-in averaging period –but maybe you can access those via the current software.

      * Strangely, the specs I have don't reveal what G-M tube is being used, but Radex devices have been using the SBM-20 –two of which I'm running here. In a typical 10 uR/hr field of background radiation (0.10 uSv/hr), that tube should average about 15cpm.

      Wait for all the built-in averaging cycles to complete, then multiply uSv/hr by 150 to get CPMs –if it uses an SBM-20.

      But: you really don't need CPMs.

      –more:


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      • * Of course Geiger counters with different G-M tubes give different CPMs in the same field of radiation, which is the argument for reporting in averaged uR/hr or uSv/hr –so as to get all of our GCs on the same page. On the other hand, uR and uSv dose units are in themselves meaningless, unless you're checking a specified small, discrete source of cesium-137 at a specified distance. Nearly all of the bumps we see in our data are due to beta from fast radon daughter decay –which has far less "dose" effect if it's external, and far more if you inhale the stuff.

        * What I've ended up doing here is graphing in percentage change from a long term (7 days long) background average. (Take the link from my name to see those graphs.) A more formal approach would be to graph in "standard deviations" from a long term average –or maybe a long term "running average", but percentages work well enough and more folks can understand what the graphs mean. (I do indicate what the expected deviation is.)

        The helicopters might well be getting the average (aerial) background for your area, but it could be something else, like practice runs with "MAD" gear (magnetic anomaly detection) or some geological work. Call the local airport and see what the official explanation is.


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        • califnative califnative

          Craig123 – thank you for your feedback on the Radex1212. I purchased it because it was affordable ($200) but now wish I waited to by an inspector so I could be on the same page with everyone else.

          Do you really think the local airport would admit to radiation monitoring? I think not ;) Thanks again :)


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  • VanneV VanneV

    List of RADCON-5 sites:
    1:EB420089 near Gurdon, AR, US 50 2014-05-05 03:30:11 A

    List of RADCON-4 sites:
    5:115 near Burlington, VT, US 217 2014-05-04 21:13:00 G
    4:802 near Salt Lake City, UT, US 149 2014-05-03 15:04:00 I


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  • I feel like the man in Ghostbusters. The station in Arkansas with high readings has an active charcoal filter and I believe I caught a hot radioactive material in the filter. I swapped out the Geiger counter with a unit from Gurdon, Ar and that unit registered high yesterday. Now I am using a different Geiger Counter and the radiation level is climbing high again. It looks like an active charcoal filter is holding the radioactive material. Now the 64 million dollar question. Where to store the radiation that is on the filter.

    PS. The radioactive material will only be detected when the temperature is above 70 degrees. I am thinking about freezing it. Any comments?


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    • Hi Harlan –

      I don't think that temperature affects the level of radiation you're reading.

      One possibility is that chilling your Geiger counter dews it up inside –shorting out the high voltage. I suggest a Ziploc baggie and a packet of fresh desiccant for that.

      * Another possibility is that a higher temperature expels trapped radon/whatever from the carbon filter.

      * The big issue here is whether we can detect "hot particles" (aka: "fuel fleas") with our humble methods and Geiger counters.

      Three years ago, Arnie Gundersen's opinion was "no" –but of course it depends on the size and activity of the particle, plus the dilligence of our methods.

      Here's the latest/best word from Fairewinds' Marco Kaltofen about his methods –worth a listen:

      > http://www.fairewinds.org/hottest-particle/

      I've tested scores of filters from my own air draws the past 3 years, even using high speed film for about 30 of them –all with negative or ambiguous results. Never-the-less, there's little doubt in my mind that I'd be able to detect the residual radiation (after the radon daughters die off) of a strong hot particle. Here's how I normally go about it:

      > http://webpages.charter.net/123goto/map.htm#air


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  • wildandfree wildandfree

    In Reno this morning, as soon as I arrived the alarm sounded on my Inspector. Ten min open air survey at 1 meter was 725. It is about 60*F and is just now starting to drizzle. Survey is about 15 min before this post. Will do a rain sample and post later.


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  • Mad_Scientists Mad_Scientists

    Scroll down for a moving, animated plume map of Chernobyl's radiation release. (never saw an animated Chernobyl plume map before, and thought others might be interested in seeing it)

    http://chernobylgallery.com/chernobyl-disaster/radiation-levels/


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  • Hi Craig
    I swapped out the GC and put another one in its place. The GC was covered with green Pollen. As you see on the chart, the air filter is still making the radiation go up when it is above 70 degrees. There is no dew, we are having the lowest humidity level this year. The unit is in a closed 6" tube and I plan on keeping it that way for the next week. Check the chart, it went up again today.
    Thanks for your suggestion.


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  • VanneV VanneV

    There are a lot of sites elevated now. Here is one:

    328 CPM
    NETC.COM © 2014
    Station ID 5:801 Denver, CO, US
    Click here for data charts
    CPM: current 328 Low 188 High 502
    Average 267, Deviation 49.8
    (CPM of Gamma in energy range 600-800keV)


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  • jcfougere jcfougere

    The scintillation detector I ordered is finally in stock, heading to the bank tomorrow to hopefully secure a loan to purchase it. Just over $3000 CAD.

    Will have gamma dose sensitivity from 0.01 μSv/h to 10 Sv/h
    Cs-137 detection as low as 100μSv/h
    Am-241 detection as low as 200μSv/h

    Will identify the following isotopes if found in high enough concentrations:
    233U, 235U, 237Np, 239Pu, 18F, 67Ga, 51Cr, 75Se, 89Sr, 99Mo, 99mTc, 103Pd, 111In, 123I, 131I, 153Sm, 201Ti, 133Xe, 40K, 226Ra, 232Th and daughters, 238U and daughters, 57Co, 60Co, 133Ba, 137Cs, 192Ir, 226Ra, 241Am

    I'll do my best to test food products but I know as far as the more toxic isotopes go I would need higher sensitivity then 100μSv/h.

    What can I do with this device? I'll of course be testing my water by boiling a large quantity and testing the residue, but what other tests can I do with this sensitivity? Where should I look, how should I look? I'd like to get the most out of this device and report back to the community. Youtube videos of results, hard evidence of contamination. I want to contribute.


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    • Deep respect dude! I was looking at a $1800 unit that hooks up to a computer, but hard to justify as I continue setting up my homestead.

      Maybe people can send you some samples and you can analyze for like $15 or something kindly like that. Sheesh, even air filters from HEPA would be cool, see what is in your air.

      Check out these resources, they will give you some ideas and how and what to test.

      http://nukeprofessional.blogspot.com/2014/03/basic-primer-on-radiation-measurement.html


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      • jcfougere jcfougere

        That's right stock, how could I forget air filters! Great way to see what's in the general vicinity.

        I am certainly open to testing samples from any confirmed friendlies from Enenews…would help to pay the loan off and inform people on items that matter to them! If anyone has some specific items in mind or want to get in touch with me to share the use of the detector, please email me jcfougere@hotmail.com

        I'll read your blog shortly :)


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        • Can I advertise your "services" on Nuke Pro, no fee to me of course, just get the word out. You set the price for testing, and any rules, like "don't send me anything over 20,000 Bq/kG"

          advise to

          stock <at>

          hawaii doot rr doot com


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          • jcfougere jcfougere

            For sure, just give me some time to figure out what I am and am not willing to test.


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            • Right, I will take no action until I hear from you.

              Good luck on the financing. You will be very happy to put that unit into productive use.


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              • jump-ball

                In June 2011 I posted here that vehicular, residential, office-retail and industrial air filters in use since 3-11 in Japan and on the u.s. left coast should be comparison tested with identical, unused, new replacement filters, which tests would have revealed, IMHO, a surprising degree of post 3-11 atmospheric contamination. No one responded, nor could I find that any such comparison tests were conducted, or the results reported.

                HEPA and other air filters in use post 3-11 are still CONTAMINATION TIME CAPSULES, and I for my small part plan to buy and offer new auto air filters to several friends here in rain-free desert cities CA who have not replaced their auto filters for 3 years, in return for giving me their old filters for comparison testing.

                I expect the 3 year post 3-11 filter accumulation results to be startlingly higher than the new filter levels, and if 'stop the testing' Lisa Jackson's EPA successor Gina McCarthy tries to similarly ban comparison tests and YT video demonstrations, you go girl, bring your politicized administrative attempt at suppression of nuclear contamination here to the desert…


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                • Do it Jump!

                  JCF may provide the means to real data

                  Collect those filters, and put them in at least zip lock bags to stop the alpha


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                  • jump-ball

                    Thanks, and will do, with my hands in protective bags as well.

                    Auto mechanics and AC technicians in Japan and here in CA and elsewhere are probably working regularly with and exposed to hazmat level filters and radiators, but they'll never learn about the danger from our 'perception-management-oriented' and politicized federal agency cabals…


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        • I test my HEPAs after a few weeks run, they run 50% over background….so they are catching stuff.

          I will be your first customer, LOL.


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  • vital1

    Some of the USA kelp watch results are in for the first series of tests. Click on markers to see test results. These are dry weight tests.

    http://kelpwatch.berkeley.edu/Locations


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  • wildandfree wildandfree

    Road trip, so yesterday I had an opportunity to take a break from my project in Reno, NV and meet with Bogdan Ambrozewicz "Bo" who is running foe Governor in the State of CA as an independent ( http://www.boambroz.com ). Instead of flying I drove over the hill. Starting in South Reno, 0900 local times all, 10 min survey was 467. Drove I-80 over Donner Pass, at the top, some 7000 feet, 10 min survey was 448 at about 1030 hrs. In Colfax CA ( nice coffee shop "La Luna" off the road) at about 1130 hrs my 10 min survey was 314. In Sacramento CA at about 1300 hrs my 10 min survey was 336. Had my meeting with Bo who is very much against Nuke Industry and is aware of many of the problems that CA is about to face. I believe he now has an even better understanding after the conversation. Stopped by Auburn CA where they filmed the movie Phenomenon with John Travolta. After dinner my 10 min survey was 296 the lowest I have seen in many months. Clear evening, little wind. Thanks to the ENEnewsers that follow and post independent readings. If I was Italian I would be bragging about our family here, but I'm not but do it anyway! Thanks.


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  • What does this really mean? What is the real 'concern level' for those in New Mexico?

    Perhaps Harlan, Carig-123, vital1 or anyone could give an opinion.

    Radiation in 'work' day spikes at WIPP:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/h7t2in7oe73qfvs/carlsbad%2005072014%20spikes.GIF

    May 3 09:39 404 cpm
    May 4 10:44 445 cpm
    May 5 09:49 451 cpm

    The is from a comment by user Jec on another thread.
    http://enenews.com/officials-workers-find-grossly-disturbed-disintegrated-destroyed-bags-above-nuclear-waste-inside-wipp-chemical-reaction-may-have-occurred-based-on-whats-been-learned-recently-foc/comment-page-1#comment-516111


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    • GQR2

      i'll take a stab at it ChasAha
      It means : we.are.so.nuked. :(


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    • I'm now looking at the current version of that graph (which requires an NETC membership). Although relatively quiet the past 3 days, there's a repeated pattern of near 50% one-hour average excursions, separated by similar quiet periods –since the February 5th event.

      However, you want to make use of Harlan's excellent graphs to establish a context for what's currently happening.

      * Goodness: previous to February, the daily CPM excursions were 3 times larger! Does that mean folks living in the area actually got a break when WIPP's roof caved in? (I sure don't know.)

      Okay: so let's get some context for _that_.

      Looking only at the Fresno California RadNet station (and I should have surveyed a number of stations –but just Fresno for now), it too shows excursions previous to February, but much larger: a whopping 280% early in December!

      We have a lot of data to look at, some of which is clearly significant –of something, but we're bereft of good counsel for what it means. I suppose that qualified professionals who are in the know would be too embarrassed to be seen contributing analysis to our group –so we're left to our own devices (so to speak).


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      • Thanks Craig-123.

        *Interesting thought on them getting a break at WIPP after February.

        Maybe the place was 'venting' regularly and until the filters were fixed or whatever nobody said or knew anything.

        hmm…?
        ___________

        Fresno California …shows excursions previous to February, but much larger: a whopping 280% early in December!

        I think there's something going on. :shock:


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  • vital1

    Australia
    Queensland
    Sunshine Coast
    April 2014 rain water test report

    Summary:

    This filter had a lot of green algae growing in it by the time I tested it. The chart is minus background, and is using CPS for the y axis. Testing time was 24 hours. As you can see, there are clear peak markers for Beryllium Be-7, and a combination peak of Iodine I-129 and Lead Pb-210.

    There was more Be-7, I-129 and Pb-210 detected in April’s test compared to March 2014. Interestingly, March had more rain, 204mm compared to April’s 171 mm. This suggests there was a lot more Be-7, Pb-210 and I-129 in the atmosphere here in April, compared to March 2014.

    Technical Details:

    Roof down pipe filter design,

    http://sccc.org.au/down-pipe-filter-design

    April roof down pipe filter test chart.

    http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/05/Down-pipe-Caloundra-April-filter-test-080514-TV62-22c-84600-B.jpg


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  • As a follow-up to my last post, I've now looked at a handful of west coast RadNet stations –as represented by NETC's graphs.

    They all evidenced a peak in daily average winter spiking –before or shortly after the first of the year (rainfall?), with the Fresno station being very pronounced.

    Usually, but not always (and allowing for a couple of obvious calibration or data processing resets), these winter periods displayed higher CPMs after 3/11/2001 (where 4 years of data are available).

    Also: I can't see anything with that (once claimed) 'round-the-world 40 day repeat period –nor in my own graphs.

    Unfortunately, the "Greg's Lab" graphs only go back 90 days. Neither Black Cat nor Radiation Network has much for histories, save for what the members save out privately (and take the link off my name for what I have).

    I suspect you could seine any actual periodic trends with good RadNet data analysis, or out of Germany's ground monitoring data –per:
    > http://odlinfo.bfs.de/
    > http://www.sendung.de/2011-07-11/radiation-is-there-and-so-is-the-data/


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  • CalifNative was disappointed in his/her RD1212. I've since accessed the full manual (at:

    > http://www.quartarad.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=132&Itemid=175

    –but still can't tell for sure what the G-M tube is, but it seems similar to the SBM-20 in other Radex GCs.

    * Again: while I use to have an Inspector with a fragile LND-7317 tube, I retrofitted it with an SBM-20 (per:

    > http://webpages.charter.net/123goto/map.htm#upd

    –after the original G-M tube sprung a leak.

    * While it's nice to have CPMs (AND your choice of a counting period), you can get by without. Note that my final data is logged and graphed as percentages (of my base background) since I got tired of equating one GC's CPMs to another's.

    * Although you're limited by the fixed 100 second (10 x 10 second cycles) counting/averaging period, you can (say) write down and average 6 of those to get a 10 minute average. (I did that with an RD1503's 4 x 40 second averaging for a year.) 100 seconds should give you a "deviation" (expected wander) of +/-0.02 uSv/hr, while 10 minutes will wander +/-0.008 uSv/hr (an SBM-20, 0.10 uSv/hr background and Poisson distribution assumed –as filtered through my rude understandings/methods).

    * My main Geiger counter (a probe, actually, that's stationed outside)

    > http://webpages.charter.net/123goto/map.htm#1310

    –is a GMC-200 with an M4011 G-M tube. Its pulses are logged with Radiation Network's "GeigerGraph" network…


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    • (network version) using GQ Electronics' supplied pulse-to-USB adaptor cable.


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      • califnative califnative

        Craig123 -thank you for looking into my Radex1212 again, I'll work with what I have (Gamma & Beta) and like you said live without the CPM. I did find a simple chart Stock offered on his website Nuke Professional. My background today was 0.11 micro sievert per hour the highest was 0.06 (0.17 total), Stocks graph says 25 CPM = 0.21 micro Sievert hour is NORMAL.

        And yet, NETC network for Tucson gamma average is 294, high is 436 which means 150-500 CPMS = cancer risk from 1 year to 90 days. Obviously I am no expert and turned to you for help only because I wondered why wouldn't my readings be the same as NETC? This is why I complained about not having CPM. I'm sure NETCs unit is more sophisticated and sensitive so I guess I'll leave it at that.

        BTW, saw something interesting 2 days ago on NETC, Petrified Forest in AZ had a really high reading of something like 1950 CPM and now it measly 44. Wonder why the high reading disappeared?

        Today's:
        31 CPM
        NETC.COM © 2014
        Station ID 1:EB5A61F3 Petrified Forest, AZ, US
        Click here for data charts
        CPM: current 31 Low 7 High 44
        Average 23, Deviation 4.8
        Average over last 10 minutes: 26

        PI and GMC-300E
        Last updated: 2014-05-11 18:41:23 GMT+0000

        Thanks again for your knowledge and help Craig :)


        Report comment

        • Briefly: this is the problem with CPMs –and between disparate monitoring methods.

          * In the same 0.10 uSv/hr field, an expensive Geiger counter with an LND-712 tube might read 10cpm, while our SBM-20 tubed devices are reading 15cpm, and a fellow with an LND-7317 tubed "Inspector" Geiger counter is clicking away at an average of 35cpm.

          * And your local EPA-RadNet station might be averaging 300cpm as reported by Harlan's NETC web site –or 3000cpm with all channels summed (as Greg's lab does the data logging).

          Of course, the comparison between your ground monitoring Geiger counter and a RadNet air monitoring station isn't very meaningful, except that a high air reading might eventuate in a slow build-up of CPMs on your property.

          * The problem with uR/hr and uSv/hr "dose" units is that our CPM spikes are usually about beta counts, which have very low effective dose values (as long as you don't inhale the stuff). We end up looking silly –shouting about Rems and Sieverts.


          Report comment

        • vital1

          Counts per minute (CPM) is fine, but it only relates to how sensitive your Geiger counter tube is.

          The more sensitive the Geiger counter tube in the model Geiger counter you have purchased, the more counts per minute it will display in any environment.

          You will find a rough CPM comparison of CPM to uSv/hr conversion, between a few Geiger counters models, at the bottom of this chart.

          http://sccc.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/Understanding-what-the-live-monitoring-chart-details-mean.jpg

          Scintillators which are much more sensitive can show thousands of counts per minute, in the same environment.

          Get a background average CPM using your model Geiger counter, in your environment. Then compare any changes to that. A background baseline CPM is what appears to be your monitoring location average over time.

          Any major high deviation from your CPM or uSv/hr average would indicate an event may be happening, or you are detecting something significant.

          Read this free Geiger counter Guide, look at the chart on the first page.

          Free Geiger Counter Use Guide.

          http://technologypals.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/03/Using-a-Geiger-Counter-to-test-food-for-Radioactive-Contamination.pdf


          Report comment

          • califnative califnative

            Craig, Vital – now I understand why you were asking about the counter tube, the difference between driving a Pinto and Mercedes, lol. Appreciate the links Vital1, all in all I'll watch for any significant event which I hope doesn't happen! Thanks for your tireless effort in educating folks who find this subject complicated.


            Report comment

  • vital1

    Fukushima Diary finances locked down!

    "After PayPal closed the account of Fukushima Diary, I noticed they blocked my personal account too."

    Iori Mochizuki who runs Fukushima Diary should be supported by the community. He has put in a fantastic effort to provide up to date information on the Fukushima Nuclear disaster.

    http://fukushima-diary.com/

    http://fukushima-diary.com/2014/05/my-personal-paypal-account-and-japanese-account-were-also-blocked-back-to-700-in-pocket/

    http://fukushima-diary.com/2014/05/column-paypal-decided-to-close-fds-paypal-account-for-no-reason-lost-one-year-living-expense-was-i-assanged/


    Report comment

    • jump-ball

      Paypal continues to do porn website business, but when they closed anti-government Michael Rivero's account, he listed the names of several paypal-using porn websites on the front page of his WhatReallyHappened.c site, and his PayPal account was quickly restored. Caught them with their pants down.


      Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    List of RADCON-5 sites:
    4:508 near Toledo, OH, US 138 2014-05-11 12:42:00 A
    4:522 near Fort Wayne, IN, US 190 2014-05-11 12:16:00 A
    5:522 near Fort Wayne, IN, US 242 2014-05-11 12:16:00 A

    List of RADCON-4 sites:
    4:308 near Charlotte, NC, US 139 2014-05-11 12:24:00 G
    5:308 near Charlotte, NC, US 258 2014-05-11 12:24:00 G
    5:508 near Toledo, OH, US 150 2014-05-11 12:42:00 G


    Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    List of RADCON-4 sites:
    5:207 near Syracuse, NY, US 166 2014-05-14 05:42:00 U

    There is no reading for Colorado Springs.


    Report comment

  • Checkmate

    I decided to join so I could put some input about different findings I have discovered. Perhaps, others can check my results against their findings. I bought a 1 lb. 11 oz. plastic can of ground coffee (which is a very popular brand in large chain food stores and was not imported, just a domestic blend)and after immediately opening it: 10 minute averages back-to-back with Inspector Alert on May 15,2014 at approx. 11am in south central WI. I have only 1 Inspector thus the a slight lag in the findings.
    Coffee 545, Background 404, Cof 492, Bkg 391, Cof 501, Bkg 390, Cof 520, Bkg 431 It appears the coffee was radioactived as it was over the 10 or 15% of error. Take my above figures and average it in different ways. It appears that c 492 & 501 plus b 391 & 390 appear to be reasonably stable for more correct comparisons. Hope you can use info and test yourself and post it. Kindest regards…


    Report comment

    • Yep I would sure love to have 2 inspectors to do simultanous testing.

      Could also do one test with GM window closed, and one with GM open, run an hour or 8. The difference would be the Alpha

      DO you transmit to any online rad site?


      Report comment

    • vital1

      “Coffee is dehydrated beans”

      The dehydration process can cause a higher than background detection in foods. This is because this process has concentrated the natural potassium K40 content.

      Coffee has a high Potassium Chloride content. Part of all Potassium is
      radioactive Potassium (K40) which is in all living things.

      So there is the possibility that your Inspector Geiger Counter is showing a
      higher than background radiation detection, because of the dehydration process has concentrated the K40. The only way to know for sure what is causing this higher detection for sure is to test it with better equipment.

      Free DIY Food testing lab Guide

      http://technologypals.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/How-to-set-up-a-home-or-community-food-testing-lab-for-radioactive-contamination.pdf

      We have been through this process here in Australia with foods like English Brewers Yeast, Cocoa Powder, and some other dried powdered foods that have high K40 content. People here using the Inspector or Inspector EXP Geiger Counters, to test these foods where getting much higher that normal background detections.

      On testing these suspect items with better equipment we concluded that these foods had above average Potassium Chloride content .

      Concentrated foods with high K40 content can cause false positive detections with sensitive Geiger Counters like the Inspectors. The only way to know if this is a false positive detection is to test the sample with much better equipment.


      Report comment

  • Checkmate

    By the way I used cpm for the 10 minute counts.


    Report comment

  • Checkmate

    Forgot to say put the counter on top of the coffee in the can. Also unfortunately I left the can open after taking the first test count for 10 minutes, but after the second coffee test I close it…and continued to open and close it accordingly. Also I placed the counter in different areas in the container. I'm not a scientist, but tried to do it to the best of my ability…


    Report comment

  • Checkmate

    No I don't Stock. I'm new here so I thought I could reply to you by pushing the report comment tag, so I guess it went to Admin. instead. Sorry about that…


    Report comment

    • Hi Checkmate.

      * Normally, your 10 minute counts wouldn't count in "CPM" mode, but you've reported what looks like good totals, so I'll assume you managed to use the "Total/Timer" mode after all.

      * I've been repeating your test, but with a teaspoon of coffee in a miniature Ziploc baggie in my test jig:
      > http://webpages.charter.net/123goto/map.htm#test-well

      ~ I got a 10 minute count of 147 (ie: 14.7cpm background) with the test well empty.

      ~ Then I got an average count of 16.4cpm with the baggie of coffee in place.

      ~ Right after that, I blocked the Geiger counter's window with a 1/8th inch thick aluminum plate –getting 13.5cpm over the third 10 minute period.

      * The assumed wander ("deviation") is about +/-1.2cpm for each 10 minute average (with my GC, not yours), so the first and third counts easily represent the same actual radiation, whereas the second count is a wider stretch. No doubt 100 minute counts (+/-0.4cpm) would clearly show an elevated count for the coffee –and something much closer to background when blocked by aluminum.

      * Since I retrofitted my Inspector with an SBM-20 G-M tube:
      > http://webpages.charter.net/123goto/map.htm#upd

      –I'm talking beta here, not alpha. But you can talk alpha by blocking the coffee count with a sheet of printer paper.

      Coffee is loaded with potassium and therefore has a small component of potassium-40, which emits about 89% beta and 11% gamma (1000 Bq/kilogram).


      Report comment

  • GQR2

    210 CPM Radcon3
    NETC.COM © 2014
    Station ID 5:635 Carlsbad, NM, US
    Click here for data charts
    CPM: current 210 Low 121 High 276
    Average 157, Deviation 24.8
    (CPM of Gamma in energy range 600-800keV)

    Last updated: 2014-05-15 11:55:00 GMT


    Report comment

  • califnative califnative

    Tucson reading high today 386 CPM

    NETC.COM © 2014
    Station ID 5:919 Tucson, AZ, US
    Click here for data charts
    CPM: current 386 Low 222 High 399
    Average 292, Deviation 32
    (CPM of Gamma in energy range 600-800keV)

    Last updated: 2014-05-16 11:09:00 GMT+0000


    Report comment

    • califnative califnative

      No Tucson NETC reading today? When a monitor disappears off the map does that mean the readings are off the chart or too high? How can I tell if the monitor is EPA's or an contributing individual? Just questions I have today.
      Phoenix is rising 8:44AM:

      350 CPM
      NETC.COM © 2014
      Station ID 5:956 Phoenix, AZ, US
      Click here for data charts
      CPM: current 350 Low 226 High 385
      Average 277, Deviation 23.7
      (CPM of Gamma in energy range 600-800keV)

      Last updated: 2014-05-17 15:37:00 GMT+0000

      Plenty of blatant chem trails where they turn the chemicals on and off showing dashes across the sky. I shouldn't of been outside this morning, feeling nauseous already.


      Report comment

      • califnative califnative

        Now Phoenix is missing from this morning. I went to NETC topic forum "EPA system not on map" and answered one of my questions:

        Posted by Norski Feb 12, 2014:

        I believe the total number of EPA BETA sites (begin with a "4" in the ID number) is 45 or 46 sites total.

        And the total number of EPA GAMMA sites is 125 or 128. (these site numbers begin with a "5", and GAMMA is the type of radiation hardest to stop.

        The number of private sites – it is 69 (75 as of March). (These sites begin with a "1"). That's all the NETC members with inexpensive geiger counters connected to this site, giving us and the rest of the world information.

        I'm still trying to find out why Phoenix and Tucson are missing from NETCs map today.


        Report comment

        • bf9 bf9

          I believe AZ is in the cross-hairs of the jet stream today, I'd agree with your assertion that the EPA stations are likely screaming and pulled them.

          http://earth.nullschool.net/#current/wind/isobaric/250hPa/orthographic=-143.14,31.94,378

          Had a very minor nosebleed later on in the afternoon yesterday (AZ).


          Report comment

          • califnative califnative

            bf9 – nice link, thank yout. I also looked at EnviroReporter.com today and after a spike in Arizona this message came up "updating data or experiencing technical difficulties"
            http://www.enviroreporter.com/radnet-air-monitoring/arizona

            I have been doing my own measurements on a Radex RD1212 Beta/Gamma Geiger counter. It showed increased spikes on Saturday 16th, yesterday slowed down a bit. My thyroid glands felt swollen on Saturday. Going to go do a reading outside now. Thanks for your comments I was wondering if there was anyone else in AZ that reads enenews.


            Report comment

            • bf9 bf9

              You're very welcome, if you click on "earth" on the bottom left of that page you can change a whole bunch of settings. I use a combination of that site, cam records on here, and NETC to figure out exactly where these rads are going- usually with a decent amount of accuracy. (With the surface wind setting along with http://hint.fm/wind/ you can also see where WIPP's shit is blowing to).

              Definitely keep us updated, I know a lot of people personally that check in here at least once a day so there's certainly readers here. As well as a certain professor who's blog I do enjoy greatly!


              Report comment

              • califnative califnative

                I noticed the earth height surface wind at 10 blows east and 70+ goes west, there is no way getting way from this!

                Still trying to understand my Russian made Radex 1212 (with the help of Craig123 and Vital1) and though I know it measures Gamma & Beta uSv/h range I just monitor any fluctuations doing (5) one minute background checks. Then it takes the lowest total background number and starts a 10 minute measurement, but after 10 minutes I basically get the same information from doing the 5. Anyway, I'll try and explain it the best I can:

                Monday 19th, 4:30PM MST, Tucson, AZ
                Example of first 1 minute measurement reading:
                14 22 8 18 22 10 12 18 26 12 Average 16
                Other averages were 15, 13, 11, 13

                10 minute background was set at 11, readings fluctuated between 0-8 so I believe the highest was 11+8=18

                On Saturday it went as high as 36 background a few times. This is the first time I' posted a radiation reading and I'm no expert. Want to be able to know if or when it's better to stay inside. Never I my lifetime did I think I would be doing this :(


                Report comment

  • vital1

    16th May 2014 – Right Sector attempts to seize largest NPP in Ukraine

    Extract:

    Policemen of the city of Energodar have detained 20 activists of the Right Sector, who tried to seize the Zaporozhye NPP.

    http://voiceofrussia.com/news/2014_05_16/Right-Sector-attempts-to-seize-largest-NPP-in-Ukraine-1602/

    Comment:

    The Ukraine Zaporizhia NPP has six reactors! If anything happened in the Ukraine, it is possible that a detection will show up on one of the Russian or European radiation monitors before it is reported in the MSM news.

    I suggest bookmarking the International Monitoring station page, and keeping an eye on the Russian, and European monitoring stations.

    International list of Radiation monitoring stations.

    http://sccc.org.au/international-radiation-monitoring-stations


    Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    List of RADCON-4 sites:
    4:917 near Riverside, CA, US 292 2014-05-17 14:21:00 G
    5:917 near Riverside, CA, US 257 2014-05-17 14:21:00 G
    4:937 near San Bernardino, CA, US 200 2014-05-17 16:51:00 G
    5:937 near San Bernardino, CA, US 406 2014-05-17 16:51:00 G


    Report comment

  • Mad_Scientists Mad_Scientists

    These may (or may not be) helpful:

    Environmental Radiation Factsheet
    https://hps.org/documents/environmental_radiation_fact_sheet.pdf

    Radioactivity in Nature
    http://www.physics.isu.edu/radinf/natural.htm


    Report comment

    • Thanks, MS: there's much baseline, survey and assumptions information in these two resources that I didn't have. The difference between the NCRP-95 (1987) and NCRP-160 (2006) documents was paticularly interesting. Average annual exposure nearly doubles.


      Report comment

  • in between

    Anyone have radiation readings from the Big Island, Hawaii? From produce or fish in Hawaii?
    The ocean water, seaweed, or sand from anywhere in the state? If so, in comparison to the west coast mainland?
    Appears that the west coast mainland may actually have gotten higher doses of radiation(?), especially up north, but i don't hear much about readings of accumulations in Hawaii. Except back in 2012 with the cow's milk, and feeding the cows boron.


    Report comment

    • Radiation Network has a station on the Big Island:
      > http://www.radiationnetwork.com/AlaskaHawaii.htm
      –at 1900 feet altitude. It's currently averaging 28cpm, but that's all I know about it. The owner doesn't disclose what Geiger counter or what his baseline average has been.

      RN's and NETC's stations are nearly all ground reading –as influenced by any fall-out accumulations in the owner's yard and on his/her roof/drainage.

      Harlan's NETC does have a private station on the Big Island, but its good records only go back to March, since when it's been logging a 14cpm average –presumably with an M4011 G-M tube device. (Neither RN nor NETC goes beyond the decimal point.)

      NETC's record for the EPA-RadNet, air breathing/monitoring Honolulu station shows a high point of 110cpm in February of 2011 (yes: before 3/11/2011), nothing special since –save for a slow decline into the station's current low 80s. (NETC logs only the 600 to 800 KeV gamma range. A graph of the entire range might look different, as might the wide spectrum response of a private, air filter reading Geiger counter.)

      * Dr. "safer than drinking water" Buesseler's map and clickable icons give you ocean analyses for Hi and the U.S. west coast.
      > http://ourradioactiveocean.org/results.html

      * I can't find any cross-ocean rad data from Greenpeace, just political action/statement stuff. Can anyone here find it?

      * Take the link off my name for what I've got.


      Report comment

  • Checkmate

    Thanks Craig for the info and comparison. Most recent data report: I had a Hepa 15 furnace filter analyzed by K14U Labs. This filter was in installed Jul. 2013 to removed Jan. 2014. A complete 6 Mos. time frame. The lab results was done Feb. 6, 2014:
    Gross G-M CPM 66
    Background CPM 31
    Net GM count rate 35 CPM
    Called the Lab and was told that this wasn't a very bad count for the filter time period, but didn't answer what areas were worse and was disappointed that the test wasn't for anything else then the mentioned. I live in a farming area (south central WI) and know the filter was there for the harvest season; it was very dirty. Does anyone else have any results from their areas…it would be interesting to compare.


    Report comment

    • * I was wondering what one gets back from KI4U: just a CPM that we could do for ourselves, it seems.

      * However: since that's a residual count, I consider it to be very significant. I've done scores of air draws and have never detected a residual here. (Mostly clean air off the ocean.)

      What we can do with our humble GCs is to slowly go over such a filter, looking for and isolating any hot spots/particles. (Wear mask and gloves. Ziploc or otherwise bag and seal everything when you're done.)

      * See my May 10th notes for readings I took of our lawnmower air filter and the contents of our vacuum cleaner's filter bag.

      I do 40 cubic meter air draws about once per month, for which see the notes under my graphs. Again: I've never found residuals (after the radon die-down), just some faintly radioactive ink from a ballpoint pen I once used to mark some of my filters.


      Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    501 CPM
    NETC.COM © 2014
    Station ID 5:806 Colorado Springs, CO, US
    Click here for data charts
    CPM: current 501 Low 311 High 532
    Average 378, Deviation 42.4
    (CPM of Gamma in energy range 600-800keV)


    Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    401 CPM
    NETC.COM © 2014
    Station ID 5:801 Denver, CO, US
    Click here for data charts
    CPM: current 401 Low 188 High 449
    Average 264, Deviation 43.9
    (CPM of Gamma in energy range 600-800keV)


    Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    List of RADCON-4 sites:
    5:103 near Providence, RI, US 244 2014-05-18 13:01:00 G
    4:530 near Saint Paul, MN, US 179 2014-05-18 12:39:00 G
    5:530 near Saint Paul, MN, US 244 2014-05-18 12:39:00 G
    5:534 near Champaign, IL, US 327 2014-05-18 12:38:00 G
    5:610 near Albuquerque, NM, US 359 2014-05-18 13:32:00 U
    5:801 near Denver, CO, US 401 2014-05-18 12:44:00 U
    5:806 near Colorado Springs, CO, US 501 2014-05-18 10:37:00 U
    4:940 near Idaho Falls, ID, US 71 2014-05-18 09:50:00 G
    5:940 near Idaho Falls, ID, US 455 2014-05-18 09:50:00 G


    Report comment

  • Checkmate

    Thanks Craig, I did view the page and it is very impressive and you have done a lot of work. There is one question, have you ever tried using readings from 2 different counters then dividing that by 2 to get a mean average? I use a triangular method to get a rough gamma reading in my area by using data from EPA in Madison, Milwaukee and Chicago and divide by 3. Of course I'm approx. in the center.
    Also I noticed you use a N95 filter for air sampling. Is there a reason you don't use a N100 filter?
    Another quick question: Can I use the CPM count to find possible hot spots in the furnace filter and then switch to a ten minute count on each one to get different readings? Thanks


    Report comment

    • * If the counters are identical, placed near but not on top of each other –with any windows facing the same direction –and any alpha sensitivity blocked (bag the meters), then summing and dividing by two would give you a 40% more reliable CPM average (the square root of twice as many counts).

      If the GCs are different, you'd have to weight their counts according to the sensitivity of each. If placed quite near each other, you might then simply consider them to be a single GC, with a total average expected count in a given field.

      For example: in (say) a 10 uR/hr (0.10 uSv/hr) gamma field, the long term average of a GMC-200's M4011 G-M tube counter and a PRM-8000's LND-712 G-M tube counter would total about 17 + 10 = 27cpm.

      * I think that averaging 3 regional RadNet stations would give less useful information –about possible considerations of wind direction, proximity to the source of what's polluting the air with radionuclides, and the reliability of each station. If one of your regional stations is hot and two are not, you should then be keenly interested in your area wind patterns –per:
      > http://hint.fm/wind/

      * For stopping hot particles before you breath them in, the 99.97% efficiency of an N100 mask is 16,700% better than an N95 mask. For determining how much stuff was in the air you were breathing (by GCing the mask afterwards), the N100 mask is less than 5% better –but costs 1300% more and is harder to cut up.

      –more:


      Report comment

      • Use the audio clicks mode to isolate a possible hot particle. If you find one, wearing mask and gloves, isolate and bag that section of the air filter.

        Here's a video –about a trophy sized hot particle:

        > http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAf6RWvydCQ

        –but do NOT emulate "Bionerd's" (as she signs herself) bravado. Where there's one particle, there might be myriad more –especially if the particle "in hand" is highly ionized and frangible. Mask, tweezers, scissors, gloves, Ziploc bags –and get rid of the stuff –maybe to someone like Vital-1 who can run a gamma spectrum (but arrange how/when to package and do so first).


        Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    List of RADCON-4 sites:
    5:713 near Omaha, NE, US 257 2014-05-21 02:43:00 U


    Report comment

  • califnative califnative

    Reposted to Radiation Monitoring Forum in regards to B4 fire event and monitoring stations in Japan and U.S. using NETC.com website compared to new.atmp.jp map website dated 2014/05/21 14:20 showing high reading in Fukushima. I don't trust NETC EPA monitors and this is a good example:

    rakingmuck
    May 21, 2014 at 12:39 am · Reply
    I could be wrong but this looks like some solid evidence to me of an event: http://new.atmc.jp/#p=undefined

    califnative califnative
    May 21, 2014 at 1:36 am · Reply
    rakingmuck – I think your right, looks like good evidence to me and what I have been saying for a while now, monitors are being MANIPULATED in Japan and the U.S. NETC.com still shows no change but surrounding areas are increasing. Thank you for sharing this link.


    Report comment

  • Checkmate

    Thanks again Craig, it was really informative and understanding. I am waiting until the Spring planting is over before changing the furnace filter that runs 24/7. At that time, I will search for that possible hot particle…Kindest regards


    Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    391 CPM
    NETC.COM © 2014
    Station ID 5:801 Denver, CO, US
    Click here for data charts
    CPM: current 391 Low 188 High 449
    Average 263, Deviation 41.7
    (CPM of Gamma in energy range 600-800keV)

    Last updated: 2014-05-21 20:41:00 GMT+0000


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  • VanneV VanneV

    List of RADCON-4 sites:
    4:212 near Buffalo, NY, US 79 2014-05-22 05:21:00 G
    5:319 near Harrisonburg, VA, US 379 2014-05-22 04:52:00 U


    Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    List of RADCON-4 sites:
    5:204 near New York City, NY, US 286 2014-05-22 09:43:00 G
    4:211 near Edison, NJ, US 73 2014-05-22 09:31:00 G
    5:211 near Edison, NJ, US 209 2014-05-22 09:31:00 G
    4:212 near Buffalo, NY, US 93 2014-05-22 11:22:00 G
    4:302 near Washington, D. C., DC, US 85 2014-05-22 11:22:00 G
    5:311 near Philadelphia, PA, US 253 2014-05-22 11:05:00 G
    5:319 near Harrisonburg, VA, US 402 2014-05-22 11:54:00 U
    4:321 near Dover, DE, US 55 2014-05-22 11:06:00 G
    5:604 near Aberdeen, SD, US 336 2014-05-22 11:39:00 G
    5:607 near Lincoln, NE, US 306 2014-05-22 11:46:00 G
    5:713 near Omaha, NE, US 304 2014-05-22 11:49:00 U
    5:811 near Billings, MT, US 783 2014-05-22 11:17:00 G


    Report comment

  • VanneV VanneV

    EXTREMELY SCARY ALERT: The Fukushima monitor at units #1-4 is not broadcasting the current readings on netc.com.


    Report comment

  • The Estimation of Cesium in Sand and Soil Samples in the United States, 2012-2013 report produced by eagerlabassistants.com has been released. This includes results for all measurements for the energy level used to determine presence of Cs-137 as well as statistically significant detections of Cs-134. There were a few other statistically significant detections among the samples that may be discussed in subsequent reports pertaining to the corresponding sample however to sum up the scope of this report, 22 of 48 samples yielded statistically significant detections for Cs137. Of those, 6 yielded statistically significant detections for Cs134. http://eagerlabassistants.com/thelab/soilproject.html


    Report comment

    • vital1

      I wish to place a Eager Lab Assistants report link under the USA country report heading at "The Food Lab,"

      http://sccc.org.au/archives/2861

      and "Radiation Food Lab"

      http://www.enviroreporter.com/2013/02/radiation-food-lab/

      The entry would be,

      ————————————————————

      USA

      21st May 2014 – Report by Eager Lab Assistants – Estimation of Cesium in Sand and Soil Samples in the United States, 2012-2013

      Extracts:

      Soil and sand samples were obtained between April 2012 and December of 2013 from a broad spectrum of areas ranging from almost every region in the continental United States.

      Results: Twenty-two (22) of forty-eight (48) samples yielded statistically significant detections for Cesium-137. Of those, six (6) yielded statistically significant detections for Cesium-134. Considering sample collection and testing dates with respect to the Fukushima Diachii NPP multiple meltdowns of March 11, 2011, those detections are strongly indicated as resulting from the same due to atmospheric deposition.

      http://eagerlabassistants.com/thelab/soilproject.html

      —————————————————————–

      Excellent report, and effort by your team.


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      • Thank you Vital1, it is much appreciated. It was a lot of work but we have very generous sample collectors, myself and two very talented and intelligent high school students who, despite this being a very complicated subject, were dedicated to the study and are becoming quite adept at the nuances of this type of analysis – I am very proud;) but I believe most importantly the results, particularly over time will be helpful. We are planning a soil survey for 2014 also and will try to obtain the areas we missed and hopefully duplicates of the 2012-2013 spots.

        Thank you too for the link. I thought we had your lab on our link page too but it's not.., if that's ok, may we link also? And I need to thank you too. I saw your flyer here after the disaster, gamma spectroscopy work and presence here ever since and find it encouraging and helpful. :)


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  • califnative califnative

    Radcon 5 Alert in Hot Springs, Arkansas

    186 CPM
    NETC.COM © 2014
    Station ID 1:EB45AA98 Hot Springs, AR, US
    Click here for data charts
    CPM: current 186 Low 10 High 251
    Average 44, Deviation 28
    Average over last 10 minutes: 156

    Pi+300E Outdoor Station
    Being checked
    Last updated: 2014-05-22 20:36:01 GMT+0000

    Are increased numbers are starting to roll in?


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  • pinksailmatt pinksailmatt

    RadNet is NOT to be trusted…so beware people. I was just pouring over some of the FOIA docs on Fuku, and found a batch of emails from our own government saying…pretty much…that the data they give out was pure bogus. But that is pretty much what I expected, as their graphs from the time of Fuku going off show just the slightest rise, when they should have been OFF-SCALE.

    I even question NETC, when the green symbol is given, esp over in Japan, when the reading is at it's HIGHEST level EVER. WTF NETC?

    Gregs Lab is really only RadNet…so it is NO BETTER.


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  • califnative califnative

    pinksailmatt – I agree with you, rakingmuck mentioned this earlier.

    May 21, 2014 at 12:39 am · Reply
    I could be wrong but this looks like some solid evidence to me of an event: http://new.atmc.jp/#p=undefined


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  • I thought the NETC readings simply show whatever is sent to them and combined? with whatever EPA records? If EPA does record an area?

    Anyway when I took one look at Japan on Weds morn, since it was just a straight 300cpm for Fukushima….for high, low and current, I didn't regard it as anything more than the highest reading those particular meter were set for…pegged out, so couldn't be an actual readings moving up or down with the rad count. Other stations in Japan seemed to be changing when I looked a little later. Fuki still stuck at 300.

    I do wish we had more private stations networking with NETC.
    I plan to buy a Geiger counter but won't be able to pass online info with dial-up speed so it'll just help people I know close by.


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