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History of The Park and Tivoli
The Park, Cornerways House

CHELTENHAM ZOO

The Park was brought by Thomas Billings, a solicitor, in 1831. He had an ambitious plan for this pear-shaped area of land - it was to be home to Gloucestershire Zoological, Botanical and Horticultural Gardens. The gardens included the grand promenade, a lake, a pagoda, plantations and conservatories, geese, swans, tropical birds, a pair of Golden Eagles, monkeys, a Bramin Bull and a Norwegian Wolf. Despite the issue of 4,000 shares at £5, and an official opening on Queen Victoria’s Coronation Day, 28 June 1838, the zoo enterprise had failed. What is left is the impressive towered building at the junction of Park Place and the Park called the Cornerways, once the entrance to the zoo.

After the failure of the zoo project, the land was sold to the architect Samuel Whitfield Daukes, who converted it into public pleasure grounds, and developed villas round the perimeter. Since 1931 The Park has been owned by colleges. First St. Mary’s Training College for Teachers, and now The University of Gloucestershire.

 

Charles Sturt

FAMOUS RESIDENTS OF TIVOLI

Tivoli as an area name was first documented in 1833 and in 1845 it was described as ‘a fashionable suburb’. The houses in Tivoli were probably inspired by the designs of J. B. Papworth, the creator of Montpellier Rotunda and some of the best houses in Lansdown.

Tivoli Road once housed many a famous resident. In the last century Charles Sturt, the explorer of Australia lived at No. 33, a house called St. Edmunds, now demolished. In the 1830, Sturt explored and mapped the Murray Darling river basin. He died in Cheltenham in 1869. At No. 11 the actor Ralph Richardson was born in 1902 and later on Dame Sidney Browne, first President of the College of Nursing, lived there. Next house was the residence of Princess Imeretinsky, whose husband was the godson of the last Russian Tsar.

 

GLOUCESTER AND CHELTENHAM TRAMROAD

Andover Road, which is now famous for its picturesque shopping area, runs on line of former Leckhampton quarries tram road. This horse-drawn tram road was laid in 1811 and it connected Leckhampton Hill with Gloucester Docks for the stone to be delivered all over Gloucestershire. On its way back from Gloucester Docks the carriages brought coal from Forrest of Dean to coal sidings of Norwood Road. The route was closed in 1861.




THINGS TO DO, PLACES TO SEE

TIVOLI SHOPPING

Similar in character to The Suffolks or Montpellier, shopping in Tivoli is a pleasant experience. With antiques, cafes and delicatessen, Andover Road shopping should not be missed.

SUFFOLKS SHOPPING

Suffolks belongs among the best areas to shop for antiques. Independent shops and boutiques along Suffolk Parade give visitors plenty to choose from.

CHURCH OF ST. PHILIP AND ST. JAMES

Originally a daughter church of St. Peter's Church in Leckhampton, Church of St. Philip and St. James was built in the mid-19th century to cope with the increasing population of Leckhampton.

UNIVERSITY OF GLOUCESTERSHIRE

Although University of Gloucestershire was formed only in 2001, Cheltenham has a long tradition of higher education. The university has now almost 9000 students.

 

 

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