Masonic Hall Photo Gallery - Grand Lodge of Free & Accepted MasonsGrand Lodge of Free & Accepted Masons

Masonic Hall Photo Gallery

Nearly 80 different Masonic Lodges, Eastern Star Chapters, and Concordant Bodies meet in our twelve Lodge rooms. Each of these Lodge rooms has its own unique architectural style. Some rooms are adorned with different styles of columns while others feature murals that have been painstakingly restored to their original splendor.

All of Masonic Hall’s Lodge Rooms are available for weddings, launch parties, business seminars, trade shows and small concerts. as well as general tours. If you are interested in having an event at Masonic Hall, kindly contact Nikole Kniesel-Kelly at 212-741-4520 or masonichallreservations [at] gmail [dot] com. More information can be found HERE.

Grand Lodge Room

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The majestic Grand Lodge Room is the crown jewel of the Masonic Hall, seating 1200 persons and rising three floors. It is used for Grand Lodge sessions and by other Lodges for major masonic functions. This fabled space is adorned with 54,000 sheets of Dutch metal gold leaf, fine brush work and Tiffany style stained glass windows. Due to its superb acoustics, it is also occasionally used by a recording studio. The entrance to the Grand Lodge room is on the 3rd floor. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}

The 2nd Floor

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The second floor collation and meeting rooms have been completely renovated and set up for media work. They can also accommodate sit down dinners ranging in size from 90 – 280 people.

 The 6th Floor

6Floor-Renaissance-Room

The Renaissance Room is considered by many as one of the most beautiful rooms in the Masonic world.  {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan} It can also be set up for social events (below).

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 6Floor-Hollender-Room 6Floor-Hollender-Room-George-Washington-Worshipful-Master Statue

The Hollander Room is a small library-conference room with the famous statue of George Washington by Brother Bryant Baker. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}

6Floor-IonicRoom

Deriving its name from one of the Ancient and Classical forms of architecture, the Ionic Room is beautifully decorated room in Mediterranean motif.  {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}

The 8th Floor

8Floor-Corinthian-Room

The Corinthian Room. The hand wrought plaster detail is set off in gilt and strong colors. Corinthian columns create vertical strength in the room. Much of the decorative art has a porcelain appearance. A two-dimensional effect is created by a two-tone blue inner border on the ceiling. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}

8Floor-Jacobean-Room

The Jacobean Room. If you were a medieval knight, you’d feel right at home here. From the heavy woodwork to the coat of arms that ring the top of the walls to the magnificent headpiece over the Master’s chair in the East to the lattice-worked ceiling, this room recalls a unique time in the history of Western Europe. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan} Now completely renovated, it can be set up for table lodge festivities (below). For a sit down dinner the ideal number is 80 people, and can accommodate table lodges for 100 attendees. 

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8Floor-Doric-Room

The Doric Room is in a Greek theme which is carried forward in a series of six repeated plaster frieze scenes which band the top of the walls. The dominating features are two sets of columns; gold leaf in the East, copper leaf in the West. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}

The 10th Floor

10Floor-French-Ionic-Room

The French Ionic Room is one of the more ornate and original rooms in Grand Lodge. Miniature French scenes are painted in oil on wall panels. Included are busts of George Washington and the Marquis de Lafayette, along with the French national coat of arms. Other highlights include gold filigree work on the ceiling and wall borders and a peautiseau finish on the walls. The Ionic columns are of the classic design and the rich reddish color of the carpet complements the wall coverings. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}  Completely renovated, it can be set up for formal dining events (below). For a sit down dinner the ideal number is 80 people, and can accommodate table lodges for 100 attendees. 

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10Floor-Colonial-Room

The Colonial Room was thoroughly researched at the Metropolitan Museum of Art. This room features colonial colors and decor with a hint of Spanish. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}

10Floor-French-Doric

The French Doric Room. Oil paintings in brown and pastels of the pastoral French countryside are the principal decor in the room, along with Doric columns and a unique stenciled blue and silver design carried through on the organ pipes. The ceiling lighting is indirect. Red, white and blue neon lights are blended to provide a light purple hue. {Photo credit: Paul Reitz}

The 12th Floor

12Floor-Empire-Room

The Empire Room was completely redecorated in early 19th Century French Neapolitan style with Greek and Roman influences. The laurel motif spotlights the Roman impact. Major wall panels are stenciled in a way which gives almost three-dimensional effect to the Empire period theme. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}

12Floor-Gothic-Room

The Gothic Room is modeled after the Sainte-Chapelle in Paris, with the blue and white fleur-de-lis design stenciled in the false windows. Done in French, European style, the Gothic Room features an elegant stellar decor in the coffered ceiling. Masonic symbols are part of each of the gilded gargoyles at the base of the ceiling beams. A major part of the room is the beautiful stained glass window in the East which portray familiar Masonic symbols. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}

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The 19th Floor

American Lodge Room 19th Floor

Modern in design and utility, the American Room gives a breathtaking view of the New York City skyline from its open windows and advantageous height. {Photo credit: Jason P. Sheridan}