Lent Day 4 – Undoing the Damage

by Fr. Robert Barron


At every point in the Gospels, we are meant to identify with Jesus. God became man that man might become God. We participate in him and thereby learn what a godly life is like. Nowhere is this clearer than in the Gospel story of the temptations in the desert.

Jesus has just been baptized. He has just learned his deepest identity and mission and now he confronts—as we all must—the great temptations. What does God want him to do? Who does God want him to be? How is he to live his life?

Now watch how, at every turn, Jesus undoes the damage of Eden caused by the Great Lie. The devil first tempts him to make his own sensual pleasure the center of his life, to measure good and evil by what sensually satisfies him. But Jesus reverses the momentum: “One does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.”

Next, Satan takes Jesus to the parapet of the Temple and tempts him to make his ego the center of his life, to make his own glory the measure of good and evil. But Jesus again counters: “You shall not put the Lord, your God, to the test.”

And then the devil takes him to a high mountain and shows him all the kingdoms of the world: “All these I shall give to you, if you will prostrate yourself and worship me.” The temptation is to make power the center of his life, to make of his own authority the measure of good and evil. But Jesus replies: “Get away, Satan! It is written: ‘The Lord, your God, shall you worship and him alone shall you serve.’”

The account in Matthew ends with a critical line: “Then the devil left him.” At the word of Jesus, even Satan must depart. Let us remember that fact when we are tempted by the Great Deceiver.

 
 

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  • Cathyrine Yu

    Thank you so much for your great reminders/reflections Fr. Barron. We are blessed by the Wisdom you share. Here are brilliant Lenten
    reflections too for those who are interested: 1) Meaning of L-E-N-T goo.gl/Wa8C6u 2) Reflections on Prayer: goo.gl/d7ptCf 3) Reflections on Fasting: goo.gl/S0EoIR God bless us all during this Lenten season.

    • Graziela

      thanks Catherine

    • Roland Benoit

      Thanks first to Father for his reflections., and thanks to all who open their minds and hearts also. In one of John’s letters is written we are God’s children now. Then in essence the author of this letter points out what will be is beyond our complete understanding. Are we obedient children who hear God speak in our lives that we are his sons, his daughters? Holy Spirit help me to see clearly each day, each moment that with your grace I may learn to love as you love.

  • Emmanuel Kijem

    This post is truly inspirational and deep. Thanks so much Fr Barron. I truly appreciate the work you are doing. Can you please re-send me days 1, 2 &3? Thanks in advance.

  • Elizabeth Ricci

    The three areas of temptation: Sensual, ego, power the center of life:

    The devil first tempts Jesus to make his own sensual pleasure the center of his life, to measure good and evil by what sensually satisfies him.
    Jesus response: “One does not live by bread alone, but by every word that comes from the mouth of God.”

    Satan takes Jesus to the parapet of the Temple and tempts him to make his ego the center of his life, to make his own glory the measure of good and evil.
    Jesus response: “You shall not put the Lord, your God, to the test.”

    And then the devil takes him to a high mountain and shows him all the kingdoms of the world: “All these I shall give to you, if you will prostrate yourself and worship me.” The temptation is to make power the center of his life, to make of his own authority the measure of good and evil.
    Jesus response: ‘The Lord, your God, shall you worship and him alone shall you serve.’”

    Thank you Father Barron for naming the category of temptations. May we respond to temptations as Jesus is quoted in the Bible.

  • rochespoint

    “The temptation is to make power the centre of his life”
    This is what Our church is most vulnerable to, especially since we are a hierarchical church, there is always a danger of the laity becoming fodder for the hierarchy despite cannon law. My own experience has been that a priest has come along and banned us from singing, band our parish council and dictated to us.
    Since priests are meant to be servants of the servants of God we need some form of dialogue to make us a true community.
    I often ask myself; if Christ came back today would He recognise His church! Pope Francis in his humility is challenging dogmatic authority of OUR church.

    • http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/valerie-bassett.html ValB

      Switch parishes…that doesn’t happen everywhere.

      • rochespoint

        Yes, that’s what I did a year ago Val. I had to leave the parish community in which I lived. I was really proactive as a welcomer, catechist, Eucharistic minister, minister of The Word.
        I really believe in community – community is key to building up and reaching out. After 14 years I shook the dust from my sandals but it saddened me. I had to leave for my own spiritual well being but not before trying to communicate with the priest. He simple said if parishioners don’t like it they can leave. It’s ironic we were called The Parish of The Good Shepherd!

    • Janet

      Go to the Bishop. As a group you must talk this over with him, the Bishop. This is not the church that I know and love.

      • Janice K

        I agree Janet this should be reported to the Bishop because this priest is not being obedient to the Pope, magisterium or his Bishop.

        • rochespoint

          Strangely enough I did go to the bishop and spoke to him face to face but he backed his priest.
          I think the shortage of priests is behind the problem. The bishop had only been a bishop for 5 minutes and in our diocese for 2 minutes.
          I think God is behind the problem because the church has swept much of Vatican 2 under the carpet. It is not listening to the Holy Spirit.
          When parishioners challenge though – they are accused by the priests of congregationalism. We called for a meeting with the priest for 4 months – he wouldn’t meet with us and we don’t have a parish council.

          • rtclovesmac

            How can God be behind the problem?
            Sometimes one has to persist to change things.
            Be loving, but be true to your Faith.
            If enough Parishioners feel the same and either leave the Parish or go to the Bishop, things will be noticed.
            However, I am sure the Priest is not a recluse. Meet him in the Church, and seek his side of the story.
            Or go to your Cardinal or Rome if need be.
            But remember, the Church is not a democracy and we are called to obedience.

          • rochespoint

            When we don’t listen to God things get difficult for us. I believe the shortage of priests in the west is down to ignoring Vatican 2. I believe we have to be obedient to Gods word.
            We have always been told to hail the magesterium but scandal has hit not only priest but bishops and cardinals too! The church has lost authority. My hope is in our new Pope – he is challenging the attitude of the hierarchy. He is not liked for this by many clerics. Yes let’s be obedient but to the truth first and the church second.

          • rtclovesmac

            I can agree that our shortage of Priests has had ill effects on the ministry here in the West.
            But not God….it is man not responding to God to do His Will.
            Be strong, faithful and Faith filled in the Holy Spirit.
            Listen to the voice that touches your Soul and do what it asks.
            God put a million million doors for His love to walk through, and one of those doors is You…

          • Janice K

            There is also taking it to papal Nuncio in Washington DC.

          • rochespoint

            Good idea Janice. I actually live in the UK but I could take it to the equivalent here. God bless, Dave

          • Janice K

            We have a parish council that is a working one but in the end our pastor oversees things and makes sure that the council does not go off in areas they shouldn’t Maybe that priest is afraid and if you left him know that he would have the final say that all of the council only want to help and be part of the christian community.

          • rochespoint

            Very positive Janice, I feel our priest is insecure and reacts!
            He was an Anglican for 30 years and only became a catholic priest 3 years ago. He has not imbibed catholic culture. This is a legacy of Pope Benedict allowing Anglican vicars to become catholic priests – I think
            It has been a failure here in the UK.

        • rochespoint

          I went to the bishop but he is backing his priest. He is a newly ordained bishop
          and comes over as a wet blanket.
          The shortage of priests is behind the problem and it will get worse before it gets better because they have swept Vatican 2 under the carpet and are not listening to the Holy Spirit.
          God doesn’t want us to go through pain but if the church powers don’t listen to Him we will suffer. The laity have so many gifts but we are bottom of the wood pile! .

    • Barbara Ann Baugh

      Quite the opposite happened parish where my parents went for many years. The parish counsel became so powerful they drove the pastors away, they were mean spirited and had no regard for the poor or even ordinary class people. My parents drove five miles to a neighboring town to Mass just to avoid this parish

    • JayRobThom

      I always found that parish councils were cliques imposing things on the rest of the community, always proclaiming ‘ we are Church’ while attacking people who wanted reverence for the Blessed Sacrament or silence before mass or hymns that weren’t soppy folk imitations -and then when priests try to undo the clique and its 1970s style jamboree worship they get assailed for authoritarianism.

      • rochespoint

        Well Jay, yes power and control can go to anyone’s head not just clergy. My own situation was that I belonged to a small church community around 150 but small is beatiful – we were like one big family and there was a wonderful generosity. Everyone visiting our parish comentated on how lovely our church was. At the sweep of a pen we were written off and turned into a mass centre or chapel of ease. The laity are the ‘body’ of the church and we shouldn’t be treated so badly.

  • http://holyspirithaitimission.org Bob McCoy

    I have great trouble with your second sentence ‘God became man that man might BECOME God.’. This is the same thing the Great Deceiver said to Eve that she would become like god which you have so eloquently written about the past couple of days. I will never BECOME God. I neither want the job nor am I qualified for the job. I want to be WITH God on my earthly journey and for all eternity, but there is a big difference between WITH and BECOME. Please be more careful with your word choice Father. This is not like you. Grace an peace.

    • Elizabeth Muhleisen

      ‘God became man that man might become God’ – Fr. Barron got this from St Athanasius and St Augustine who said the same thing. It is sound Catholic doctrine but can be confusing as you say. There are a number of web sites that explain this in detail.

      • Florence Ouzts

        Bob’s reaction to Fr. Barron’s statement, “God became man that man might BECOME God” is understandable. I, too, had a similar reaction when I first read it. The thought of man being capable of becoming God is
        unfathomable, semantically speaking, “becoming God” and being more God-like (reaching a level of Holiness) are not the same. To “become God” leads one to envision a lot of strong ego -minded people displaying behaviors as a false god. The meaning of an incarnate word is governed by human perception and the meaning that we bring to it based on our limited spiritual maturity. “God became man that man might strive to become more Godlike” perhaps may be a better choice of words, and less frightening to those of us common souls who are humble sinners trying to draw closer to God and grow in faith. Not to minimize the words and thoughts of St. Augustine and others, but such words lifted out of context lead to confusion.

      • Lottie

        If Fr. Barron is not going to clarify himself, can you please send me specifically to a website for clarification?

        • LansingECJ

          This website gives a sound explanation. I hope it helps. How can men become God? – AskACatholic.com
          http://www.askacatholic.com/_…/2008…/2008JulyHowCanMenBecomeGod.cfm

        • Elizabeth Muhleisen

          It’s in the Catechism, no. 460.

          • Lottie

            Thank you! You are so right. This is hard for me to understand but I am glad to have the Catechism as a starting point.

        • quisutDeusmpc

          The two best resources, I know of, to start with available from Amazon.com:

          “Deification and Grace” by Daniel A. Keating published 2007 by Sapientia Press of Ave Maria University from their series ‘Introductions to Catholic Doctrine’.

          “The Roots of Christian Mysticism: Texts from the Patristic Era with Commentary” by Olivier Clement published 1993 by New City Press (the publishing arm of Chiara Lubich’s Focolare movement)

      • Maureen Shannon Robertson

        Thank you for clarifying that. I had the same reaction to that sentence as Bob did.

    • http://fineartamerica.com/profiles/valerie-bassett.html ValB

      We participate in him and thereby learn what a godly life is like….
      He follows up that remark….

    • john t.

      You might think of this another way. It’s obvious that no created being can become something that is uncreated — so in that sense, none of has has the ability to become the eternal God. But, we have been instructed to be perfect as our heavenly Father is perfect. For those who desire such a result, it will eventually be realized once we reside with Him in heaven, for nothing imperfect can reside there. By God becoming man, man then had the opportunity to become God(like) in the eternal paradise. In a sense, this is somewhat like the argument that Mary can’t be the mother of God who is uncreated. She is the mother of God because of her cooperation in accepting the Holy Spirit’s generation of the child Jesus. At least I see the similarity.

      • C. Wayne Childers

        I reacted to that statement as well. It is a popular thought and very similar to Mormon theology and that of the prosperity gospel evangelicals. My conviction is that man cannot become God. He can become Godlike. Probably semantics.

        • guilouv

          Actually the Mormon theology is very different. It states that God WAS a man, and He became GOD. Becoming perfect like our heavenly Father is Perfect is our goal. Jesus Christ Himself GOD, commanded us to be perfect as He is Perfect.

      • Mary

        Exactly!

      • Mollie

        Here’s how I see it. If we are in the state of grace, Christ—who is God—lives in us. The more we allow Him to increase in us and take us over, we become Him. So in this sense, it can be said that we become God. No, we will never be the Infinite Supreme Being, but if we allow Him He can transform us into Himself.

        • grateful1

          Thanks for this, Mollie. I found both of Fr. Barron’s statements (if they are indeed both his) extremely troubling. Your citation to Galatians in response to his first statement (that “we become God”) seems to me to confirm the wrongness of his statement. To say that “it is no longer I who live, but it is Christ who lives in me” is not at all the same thing as saying “we become God.” I do agree entirely with your second comment that Christ always knew Himself to be the Son of God. (For example, when Mary and Joseph found Him in the temple, He asked them, “Did you not know that I must be about my Father’s business?”). Who’s writing these reflections?

          • Madzi

            We read in Luke 2:52 that “He advanced in wisdom and age.”
            I found this on a Catholic forum and I do believe it explains what Father wrote:
            ” So was He deficient in wisdom before? No, the Fathers of the Church, after St. Athanasius, point out there is a difference between actual growth in wisdom, and growth in manifestation of it–how much He showed. He measured it out in accord with each point of age. If at age 3 for example He had shown His full wisdom, it would have been overwhelming. Rather, He chose a gradual self-revelation. Only late in His public life did he say such things as, “I and the Father are one” (John 10:30) and, “Before Abraham was, I AM” (John 8:58). Thus St. Athanasius, in his Third Oration Against the Arians, wrote: “Gradually as the body grew and the Word manifested itself in it. He is acknowledged first by Peter, then by all.”
            Again, in Mark 13:32 He Himself said He did not know the day of the end. Pope St. Gregory the Great gave us the answer to this in his Epistle to Eulogius: ‘… in the nature of His humanity He knew the day… but not from the nature of humanity did He know it.’ That is, in our terms, the information did register on His human mind, even though His humanity was not the source of that information.”

        • quisutDeusmpc

          In regards to “Jesus…learned”, the thing that came to my mind was the phrase “God died”. In the one Person of Jesus Christ there are two natures – one fully divine, the other fully human. That is the “what” of Him. But we do not experience ourselves as “whats”, but as “who”(s). So what can be said of one of His natures (either His human or His divine nature), can be said of Him as a Person. This is known in theological parlance as the “communicatio idiomatum” (the communication of idioms. The ‘communication of idioms’ means what can be said of one of the natures of Christ can be said of the Person. It is not heretical to say “Jesus learned” because we know as to His human nature He progressed through the stages from conception, to birth, to toddlerhood, to childhood, to adolescence, to mature manhood and in doing so, in His human nature, “progressed in wisdom, and stature, and grace” (cf. Luke 2: 40, 52). In His Divine Nature, obviously He knows all things, is Grace Itself. Humanity doesn’t add anything to God. God is infinite, eternal, perfect subsistent being. It is not as if in the Incarnation God is more than He was (Infinity + one). He is Perfect Being. Our human being (although it is all that we experience on the material level and is all that we have known) is sub-ordinate; it participates in Being. So, as you said, “at no time ini His life could He have been unaware of His identity or His mission” is true with regards to His Divine Nature, but with regards to His human nature, He grows in realization and understanding as we do, and His Divinity experiences what that is like from His human nature while remaining what It / He is (omniscient, omnipresent, etc).

          • Mollie

            Thank you for that explanation. I understand it in theory, but all I can imagine about it is that Jesus must have somehow put His Divine knowledge on hold, or that He had the ability to turn it on and off as needed. I just can not fathom how else God could be said to learn something. I am not questioning the teaching, I am simply trying to wrap my head around it. :-)

      • grateful1

        The problem is that this is not what Fr. Barron said.

    • grateful1

      I’m getting the sense that Fr. Barron did not write this reflection himself. You’re right, Bob, that this is not like him at all.

      • quisutDeusmpc

        It is said at every Mass by the priest. After blessing the bread, he pours a little water into the wine and says this prayer inaudibly,

        “By the mystery of this water and wine may we come to share in the divinity of Christ who humbled himself to share in our humanity.”

    • Gaffer7

      Perhaps the answer lies in the MYSTERY OF THE TRINITY! — Our Mother Mary is DAUGHTER OF THE FATHER, MOTHER OF THE SON, SPOUSE OF THE HOLY SPIRIT. Mary is without original sin (privilege granted through no merit of her own) Mary is humble enough to know this (we with original sin have our EGO’S) Mary, the perfect daughter of the FATHER IS POWERED BY THE HOLY SPIRIT.– We become BROTHERS AND SISTERS OF CHRIST? … Have been cogitating this mystery ever since my son became a late vocation in the missionary order of the SOCIETY OF OUR LADY OF THE MOST HOLY TRINITY.

    • Keith Abraham

      I can accept and fully believe we become God-like, that’s the perfection we’re called to, but to “become God” is impossible. Looking at the wording in the catechism and understanding it quotes Sts. Irenaeus and Thomas Aquinas, I still find the wording disturbing… Though I get that when we eat and drink the body and blood of Jesus we have literal God in us and it changes us, but I think the wording should be better. I submit to Holy Mother Church but still, that and the idea that Jesus didn’t know who He was until baptism, St. John the Baptist knew it before Christ? Something is wrong.

      • quisutDeusmpc

        This is the aspect of the teaching that I initially struggled with. We do not, in fact cannot, ontologically become God. God in and of Himself if infinite, eternal, et al. In addition, Jesus Christ is the “ONLY-begotten” Son of God. However, it has to do with how the Church came to understand Jesus Christ in the Church’s Tradition and Scriptures. Jesus Christ’s “personhood” (Greek, ‘hypostasis’), metaphysically, is the Divine Logos, the Second Person of the Trinity. In the Incarnation, He assumes to Himself (the technical terminology is ‘hypostatic union’) a complete human nature (a rational soul, and a human body). When the Fathers of the early Church and others (St. Irenaeus, St. Athanasius, St. Augustine, St. Basil the Great, St. Gregory Nazianzus, St. Cyril of Alexandria, St. John Damascene, St. Leo the Great, St. Thomas Aquinas, et al) say that we are deified in Christ, they mean that in our baptism (where we are first sacramentally participate in Christ’s Incarnation, Death, and Resurrection), chrismation / confirmation (when we participate in the pouring out of the Holy Spirit into the Church at Pentecost), and most especially in the Eucharist / Holy Communion (cf. John 6: 53-56, I Cor. 10: 16, 17) we are indwelt by the Holy Trinity. Just as Christ’s divine nature was hidden in His human nature, so with us, our human nature hides the supernatural reality of the Holy Trinity dwelling within us. The ancient Fathers called this the ‘admirabile commercium’ (literally, the admirable commerce; popularly known as ‘the graced exchange’). What Christ is by nature, we become by grace. We become engrafted into (hypostatically united to), Christ’s human nature. This is the thrust of all of St. Paul’s treatments, in the sacred Scriptures, of the Church as the ‘body of Christ’ (cf. I Corinthians 12: 12-31; Romans 12: 3-8; Ephesians 4: 1-16). The ‘body’ pertains to His human nature. We are, as individual persons, organs, or glands, or cells in Christ’s human nature. We are, literally, IN Christ.

        As to the idea that Jesus didn’t know who He was until baptism, that is an ancient heresy of the Church known as ‘adoptoinism’ (also known as ‘dynamic monarchianism’) by Theodotus of Byzantium the Ebionites, and Paul of Samosata. It went something like, Jesus didn’t become God’s Son until or in His baptism. It’s an ancient heresy.

        But ‘theosis’ (deification, divinization) is not a heresy. It has always been held by the Church. The two great theological Doctors of the Church (St. Augustine and St. Thomas Aquinas) held and taught it. The Church’s greatest Doctors of Prayer / the Mystical Life (St. Teresa of Jesus, St. John of the Cross, and St. Therese of Lisieux) all held and taught it – although they use the terminology of the spiritual / mystical life and of prayer (union with God, the prayer of contemplation, etc).

        • Tracey McAskill

          Thank you for this explanation! Brief, concise and very helpful to me.

          • quisutDeusmpc

            I don’t remember how I came across a book by Daniel A. Keating entitled “Deification and Grace published by Sapientia Press out of Ave Maria University in Florida (which imprint has now been assumed by The Catholic University of America). The theology is not mine, it is Dr. Keating’s, a member of the Servants of the Word. I am merely an overjoyed propagator. This teaching has transformed my spiritual and prayer life. Dr. Keating does a wonderful job of describing and explaining with plenty of quotes from early Church Fathers (both Greek and Latin) and generous exegesis of various pericopes from the sacred Scriptures. I highly recommend it as a resource.

    • lolarone

      Focus: Jesus said:be one with him as he is one with the Father. God is Love, and he who lives in love , lives in God, and God in him! Dwell on that concept.

    • Friend

      Thank you, Bob. My reaction exactly. “God-like” would have been a more acceptable reasoning, but that sentence certainly did certainly confuse me.

    • Kimberly Gail

      I thought the same thing. It hit me funny and sounds like Mormon teaching…which I seriously doubt was Father Barron’s intent. Glad to see some clarification that other readers provided. I will look further at those.

    • Barbara Ann Baugh

      My question here is are these reflections not monitored so that our questions can be cleared up. I often question deeply my own responses

    • Teri Wetter

      Agree. I too disagree with this sentence and I don’t care who said it.

      • quisutDeusmpc

        It is said at every Mass by the priest. After he blesses the bread, he pours a little water into the wine and inaudibly (according to the Ordinary of the Mass ),

        “By the mystery of this water and wine may we come to share in the divinity of Christ who humbled himself to share in our humanity.”

        • grateful1

          Thank you, Quis. Yes, we “share” in His divinity, “partake” in it. And as a result, God abides in us and we in God. But we do not thereby “become” God. If I’m incorrect, so be it, and I will acknowledge my error and obediently defer to Church teaching. But I don’t understand this to be Church teaching, at least not as thus explained.

          • quisutDeusmpc

            It has to do with the theology of the Incarnate Word. At Nicea, Chalcedon, Constantinople, and Ephesus when the Church was trying to better comprehend who and what Christ is, in order to respond to heresies that were cropping up (Ebionism, Arianism, Nestorianism, et al) they had to invent a term to speak about the ‘threeness’ that is the ‘oneness’ of God. The ‘oneness’ or unity of God is His divinity. There is only one ‘Godhead’ or God. But in the one God there are three ‘somethings’ that the Church came to call, at first, ‘prosopons’ (in Greek). This was the Greek word for ‘person’ that derived from ancient Greek theater. The ‘prosopa’ was the mask that actors wore in theater to be a character. The problem that the Church discovered with this term was it implied that God only SEEMED to be a person (an actor puts on different masks for different parts) and lent itself to the heresy of ‘modalism’ (the one God puts on the mask as Father for the Old Testament people of God, the mask of Jesus Christ for the Apostles and the New Testament Church, and the mask of the Holy Spirit for the Apostolic Church, but underneath it is one and the same God who only appear to be separate). Eventually the Church used the term ‘hypostasis’ (in Greek) and ‘persona’ (in Latin) to refer to the actual three separate Divine Persons in the one Godhead of God.

            The Divine Logos (‘the Word’; the Second Person of the Trinity) is, from all eternity, Divine – consubstantial with the Father and the Holy Spirit, ‘God from God, true God from true God, begotten not made’ as we say in the Nicene-Constantinopolitan creed). He is, has always been, and will always be eternally begotten of the Father, the only-begotten of the Father, begotten not made. But as a human being, He assumed to Himself a human nature temporally in time. Or to put it another way, there never has been a moment when God the Son ever was not the only-begotten Son of God, but there has been a time when He wasn’t a human being (from the beginning of creation until His conception in the womb of the Blessed Virgin Mary in the Incarnation). The Divine Word’s “personhood” (hypostasis) pertains to His Divinity. He, however, assumes to Himself a complete human nature (a rational soul and a human body), in time. He ‘hypostatically unites’ to His Person, a human nature. In Christ, humanity is “fused” (for lack of a totally historically correct theological term) to His divinity. His humanity ‘partakes of’ His divinity.

            When Jesus Christ undergoes the Paschal Mystery (It is finished) and is Resurrected, His human nature is totally divinized. It is no longer able to die, it is no longer subject to sin, it is immortally, sinlessly deified. What happens in baptism is we are sacramentally ingrafted into Christ. We, each of us individually and the Church as a whole, “BECOME” His human body. That is what the Church IS, “the body of Christ”; the extension, through time, of the Incarnate Christ – not simply as a pious or sentimental metaphor or analogy, not simply by imitation (ethically or morally), but organically and really. We remain who we are (human beings), but we are ingrafted into or ‘hypostatically united’ to the risen Christ. I have read it stated, “What Christ is by nature, we become by grace” (filii in Fileo, ‘sons in the Son’).

            As to it being the Church’s teaching, I would refer you to the Catechism of the Catholic Church’s paragraph 460, the second half of paragraph 398, paragraph 1598 [where St. Gregory of Nazianzus, regarding the priesthood and holy orders, that the priest is 'divinized (i. e. completely configured to Christ in holy orders) and divinizes (i. e. the Church through ministering the mysteries of the sacraments)], paragraph 1988 (with regards to Grace and Justification), paragraph 1999 (where it is equated to ‘sanctifying or deifying grace’), and paragraph 2670 (concerning the indwelling Holy Spirit, where it quotes St. Gregory Nazianzus, the Theologian, ‘Oratio 31, 28), and to St. Peter himself in the sacred Scriptures,

            “His divine power has bestowed on us everything that makes for life and devotion, through the knowledge of him who called us by his own glory and power. Through these [His divine glory and power], he has bestowed on us the precious and very great promises, so that through them you may come to PARTAKE IN THE DIVINE NATURE, after escaping from the corruption that is in the world because of evil desire.”
            cf. II Peter 1: 3, 4

            Look, ‘theosis’ (deification, divinization, partakers of the divine nature) has been part and parcel of the Church’s understanding of ‘salvation’ from the very beginning. It is what St. Paul means by being “in Christ”, the Church being the “body of Christ”, the infusion of the Holy Spirit into believers in and through the sacraments. Often times the doctrine is eclipsed in the western (Latin) Church, but it has been held, as St. Vincent of Lerins said, “By all, everywhere, always”. St. Clement of Alexandria, St. Irenaeus (a disciple of Polycarp who received it from St. John – “the Word made flesh”, “the power to become children of God”, St. Athanasius, St. Basil, St. Gregory of Nyssa, St. Gregory Nazianzus, St. Augustine, St. John Chrysostom, St. John Cassian, St. John Damascene, St. Ambrose of Milan, St. Cyril of Alexandria, St. Pope Leo the Great, St. Hilary of Poitiers, Maximus the Confessor, Dionysius the Areopagite, St. Anselm of Canterbury, Didymus the Blind, St. Ephrem the Syrian, Simeon the New Theologian, St. Thomas Aquinas, St. John of the Cross, Ven. John Henry Cardinal Newman, and St. Pope John Paul II. The language used is not often as shocking as “become God”, but includes “adoptive sonship”, “divine filiation” (St. Josemaria Escriva), “contemplative union”, “union with God”, but they all are aspects of ‘theosis’.

          • grateful1

            Thank you, Quis. I’m somewhat (far from thoroughly) familiar with the scriptures, synodal and council statements, creeds, doctrines, dogmas, teachings, saintly writings, church history, and theology you cite, and I appreciate your taking the time to lay them out so well, both as a refresher for those of us (myself included) who love pondering them and for those who have never been exposed to them in such a clear and succinct way. I embrace all of them, and what my limited human understanding finds difficult to comprehend by reason alone I willingly accept on faith. But these sources themselves do not agree on the meaning of “we become God.” In my view, Father Barron’s use of that language obscures rather than illuminates his otherwise unassailable point that “at every point in the Gospels, we are meant to identify with Jesus.”

          • quisutDeusmpc

            Sometimes when we hear something put in a particular way, to hear it put another way helps to jar us and forces us to examine it, ask ourselves what that means, why we are unsure, and then examine it in depth. In the West, we have tended to use the term “sanctification” as an aspect of our salvation, “justification” for what happens in baptism, and “salvation” as an overarching umbrella term that embraces all aspects of what “grace” accomplishes in us. These words tend to place the emphasis on what we as human beings gain from Christ’s Incarnation, Life, Passion, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension into heaven bring to our humanity (anthropological soteriology). For some reason, In my opinion, the terms “theosis” (in Greek), “deification” & “divinization” (in Latin) places the emphasis back onto God – what God Himself has done for us. The terms are less juridical and technical and more organic. They show the connection between Jesus Christ and the Church, how salvation flows “through Him, with Him, and in Him”; they are more personal, experiential and less technical and arcane. The visceral reaction that this somehow obscures the distinction between Creator and creature was present, but as I began to learn what the Fathers of the early Church, the Doctors of the Church and the saints meant by it, I realized that the terms were originally introduced in the first five centuries of the Church when those to whom the Gospel was preached were non-Jewish “Gentiles” (to be read, a Greco-Roman audience – Hellenistic / philosophic education, Roman law and administration). In the ancient world, it was only the Emperor of the Roman Empire, and that fairly recently with the emperor Caesar Augustus who was the first to be declared the “son of the gods”. So for a common serf or a slave or even a Roman patrician to hear that the God of the Jews, in Jesus Christ, has made ALL of His followers, “sons of God”, has by His Word “adopted” them (which had a specific meaning in Roman law) as His own sons and daughters seemed INCONCEIVABLY wonderful, when only the Emperor was the “son of the gods” of the Greco-Roman polytheistic pantheon. And the “sonship” that was theirs wasn’t just metaphorical or sentimental OR juridical, but personal and real through, with, and in the Incarnation was like….heaven.

    • Tracey McAskill

      I believe the Eastern Orthodox Church promotes this quotation, as opposed to the Roman Catholic Church. It is not news to them. Through His mercy and grace we are to called to become God, not merely like God. We are to stretch beyond imitation, yet God alone is Almighty.

      Become can be used in the following ways:
      as a linking verb (followed by an adjective or noun complement): The problem became worse. ♦ He became president in 2001.
      as a transitive verb: Blue is a colour that becomes you.

      1to start to be something [LINKING VERB]
      a.
      to change and start to be something different, or to start to have adifferent quality
      The sky became dark.
      People were becoming increasingly angry about the delay.
      Christine decided to become a writer.
      São Paulo has become the largest city in South America.

    • JayRobThom

      Actually it’s Satan who tells Eve that she & Adam will be ‘LIKE God, knowing good and evil’. If we die in grace, we will be perfectly united with Christ, entire sharers in the divinity – as the silent prayer at the mixture if water and wine says ‘may we come to share in the divinity of Christ’ – if we share the divinity perfectly then the statement is correct. But we don’t change or evolve into God but God takes us into Himself.

    • quisutDeusmpc

      Catechism of the Catholic Church, paragraph 460,

      “The Word became flesh to make us ‘partakers of the divine nature’ (cf. II Peter 1: 4): “For this is why the Word became man, and the Son of God became the Son of man: so that man, by entering into communion with the Word and thus receiving divine sonship, might become a son of God” [St. Irenaeus, 'Adversus Haeresis' 3.19.1]. “For the Son of God became man so that we might become God” [St. Athanasius, 'De Incarnatio' 54. 3]. “The only-begotten Son of God, wanting to make us sharers in his divinity, assumed our nature, so that he, made man, might make men gods” [St. Thomas Aquinas, 'Opuscula 57.1-4]

      It comes from Jesus Christ Himself, as a result of the ‘enhypostia’ (in-Personing) of our human nature in / into / hypostatically united to the Incarnation of the Divine Logos, the Word, the Second Person of the Trinity. When “the Word was made flesh” (John 1: 14), Jesus Christ divinized, or deified human nature. In Him, human nature (a rational soul and a human body; St. Gregory Nazianzus, “What has not been assumed, has not been saved”) His Person / He, as the Word, being both infinite and eternal, whatever partakes of humanity is, in Him, deified or recreated through faith and baptism (cf. John 3: 1-21; Ezek. 36: 25-27; Titus 3: 3-8; Is. 44: 3; Col. 2: 9-15; Joel 3: 1-2, Rom. 5: 5; II Peter 1: 4) in the Incarnation, sinless Life, Passion, Death, Resurrection, and Ascension of Jesus Christ.

      “My sheep hear my voice; I know them, and they follow me. I give them eternal life, and they shall never perish. No one can take them out of my hand. My Father, who has given them to me, is greater than all, and no one can take them out of the Father’s hand. The Father and I are one.” The Jews again picked up rocks to stone him. Jesus answered them, “I have shown you many good works from my Father. For which of these are you trying to stone me?” The Jews answered him, “We are not stoning you for a good work but for blasphemy. You, a man, are making yourself God.” Jesus answered them,u “Is it not written in your law, ‘I said, “YOU ARE GODS”’? If it calls them gods to whom the word of God came, and scripture cannot be set aside, can you say that the one whom the Father has consecrated and sent into the world blasphemes because I said, ‘I am the Son of God’?” (emphasis mine, cf. John 10: 27-36)

      In the Judaism of Jesus’s time it was punishable by death for a mere man to speak the blasphemy that Jesus here says to the Jews of His time, “The Father and I are one” (‘because you a mere man are making yourself equal with God’); except that Jesus Christ isn’t a mere man like you and me. He is fully human, but He is also fully divine – two natures ( a divine nature – the Second Person of the Trinity consubstantial with the Father, & a human nature – a rational soul and a human body) in the one Divine Person of the Eternal Word (the Divine Logos). Jesus Christ came to relive a human life from conception to death to “recapitulate” (Greek, ‘anakephalaiosis’ – to reconcile, restore, recreate – literally, to ‘re-head’ or reestablish God’s dominion of all things, both in heaven and on earth, cf. Eph. 1: 10) ALL of salvation history from creation, in Adam, to the end of time. Having done so, (“It is finished”, cf. John 19: 30), “He handed over the Spirit” (John 19: 30; “Father, into your hands I commend My Spirit”), the same Holy Spirit that is poured into the Church at Pentecost, and into each of us at our baptism (cf. Acts 2: 1-13, Rom. 5: 5).

      We are ingrafted into Christ in the Church, which is the ‘body of Christ’ (cf. Rom. 11: 16-24) through baptism, we are sealed as ‘cruciform’ or ‘chrismated’ in the myron of Confirmation (Acts 2), we are spiritually nourished or united in the Eucharist by participating in Him (body, blood, soul, and divinity; cf. I Cor. 10: 16, 17) in Holy Communion. We have been made to partake of the divine nature in Christ,

      “His divine power has bestowed on us everything that makes for life and devotion, through the knowledge of him who called us by his own glory and power. Through these, he has bestowed on us the precious and very great promises, so that through them YOU MAY COME TO SHARE IN THE DIVINE NATURE, after escaping from the corruption that is in the world because of evil desire. For this very reason, make every effort to supplement your faith with virtue, virtue with knowledge, knowledge with self-control, self-control with endurance, endurance with devotion, devotion with mutual affection, mutual affection with love. If these are yours and increase in abundance, they will keep you from being idle or unfruitful in the knowledge of our Lord Jesus Christ.”
      (emphasis mine, cf. II Peter 1: 3-8; Psalm 82: 6, 7; John 10: 33-36)

      “Remain in me, as I remain in you. Just as a branch cannot bear fruit on its own unless it remains on the vine, so neither can you unless you remain in me. I am the vine, you are the branches. Whoever remains in me and I in him will bear much fruit, because without me you can do nothing. Anyone who does not remain in me will be thrown out like a branch and wither; people will gather them and throw them into a fire and they will be burned. If you remain in me and my words remain in you, ask for whatever you want and it will be done for you.” (cf. John 15: 4-7)

      ““Father, the hour has come. Give glory to your son, so that your son may glorify you, just as you gave him authority over all people, so that he may give eternal life to all you gave him….I pray for them. I do not pray for the world but for the ones you have given me, because they are yours, and everything of mine is yours and everything of yours is mine, and I have been glorified in them….I pray not only for them, but also for those who will believe in me through their word, SO THAT THEY MAY ALL BE ONOE, AS YOU, FATHER, ARE IN ME AND I IN YOU, THAT THEY ALSO MAY BE IN US, that the world may believe that you sent me. And I have given them the glory you gave me, SO AHT THEY MAY BE ONE, AS WE ARE ONE, I IN THEM AND YOU IN ME, THAT THEY MAY BE BROUGHT TO PERFECTION AS ONE, that the world may know that you sent me, and that you loved them even as you loved me.” Father, they are your gift to me. I wish that where I am they also may be with me, that they may see my glory that you gave me, because you loved me before the foundation of the world.”
      (cf. John 17: 1b-2, 9-10, 20-24)

      “As a body is one though it has many parts, and all the parts of the body, though many, are one body, so also Christ. For in one Spirit we were all baptized into one body, whether Jews or Greeks, slaves or free persons, and we were all given to drink of one Spirit. Now the body is not a single part, but many. If a foot should say, “Because I am not a hand I do not belong to the body,” it does not for this reason belong any less to the body. Or if an ear should say, “Because I am not an eye I do not belong to the body,” it does not for this reason belong any less to the body. If the whole body were an eye, where would the hearing be? If the whole body were hearing, where would the sense of smell be? But as it is, God placed the parts, each one of them, in the body as he intended. If they were all one part, where would the body be? But as it is, there are many parts, yet one body. The eye cannot say to the hand, “I do not need you,” nor again the head to the feet, “I do not need you.” Indeed, the parts of the body that seem to be weaker are all the more necessary, and those parts of the body that we consider less honorable we surround with greater honor, and our less presentable parts are treated with greater propriety, whereas our more presentable parts do not need this. But God has so constructed the body as to give greater honor to a part that is without it, so that there may be no division in the body, but that the parts may have the same concern for one another. If [one] part suffers, all the parts suffer with it; if one part is honored, all the parts share its joy.
      Application to Christ. Now you are Christ’s body, and individually parts of it.” (cf. I Cor. 12: 12-27)

      If Christ is our head, the head of the body, the Church, and we are Christ’s body, then it remains for the body, the Church, to be in heaven, where the head, Christ, is. Our relationship to Christ is not external or extrinsic as if our being made into His image and likeness is merely ethical or moral. Nor is it merely juridical, in such manner that when I commit a mortal sin, I am no longer granted God’s grace and under the condemnation of death and hell. It is organic and real. When we partake of Holy Communion, Jesus Christ’s risen body, blood, soul and divinity is united to our mortal, human nature. We become, sacramentally, deified, divinized. We become one with Christ in the Holy Spirit which is in us. Since we are united in the Holy Spirit, and the Holy Spirit is united to Christ, and Christ is united to the Father, we become one with, partake or participate in, share in the divine nature, because Jesus Christ condescended to empty Himself and become like us in all things, except sin.

      “For since he [God] bestowed on us his own image and his own Spirit and we did not keep them safe [i. e. in Adam], he [Christ] took himself a share in our poor and weak nature, in order that he might cleanse us and make us incorruptible, and establish us once more as partakers of his divinity.” (cf. John of Damascus, ‘De Fide Orthodox’ 4.13)

      “Be [we follow] the only true and steadfast Teacher, the Word of God, our Lord Jesus Christ, who did, through his transcendent love, become what we are, that he might bring us to be even what he is Himself.” (cf. St. Irenaeus, ‘Adversus Haeresis’ 5.1

      “For [the Son] took on him that which he was not that he might hide that which he was; he hid that which he was that he might be tempted in it, and that which he was not might be redeemed, in order that he might call us by means of that which he was not to that which he was.” (cf. St. Ambrose of Milan, ‘De Spiritu’ I. 9)

      “For this thing God does, out of sons of men he makes sons of God: because out of Son of God he has made Son of Man….For the Son of God has been made partaker of mortality, in order that mortal man may be made partaker of divinity.” (cf. St. Augustine, ‘Enarration in Psalms’ 52.5)

      “He united humanity to himself in such a way that he remained God, unchangeable. He imparted divinity to human beings in such a way that he did not destroy, but enriched them, by glorification.” (cf. St. Leo the Great, ‘Sermons’ 26.2)

      With regards to your mental reservation in regards to Satan and the Fall from Grace in the Garden of Eden, a few thoughts. The lie that Satan told did not pertain to Adam and Eve would become like God, the lie was that becoming like God meant humanity ‘knowing’ (the word know in Biblical parlance meant a knowledge that flowed from an intimate participation in something or someone [as in, Adam 'knew' Eve, his wife, and she conceived a son')] ‘good AND evil’. God’s intention, from the beginning, was that we would become like Him ‘knowing’ ONLY good, NOT ‘knowing’ ‘good AND evil’. That is, that we would become like Him, knowing only Him and His Word,

      “Beloved, we are God’s children now; what we shall be has not yet been revealed. We do know that when it is revealed [in heaven] we shall be like him, for we shall see him as he is.” (cf. I John 3: 2)

      “At present we see indistinctly, as in a mirror, but then face to face. At present I know partially; then I shall know fully, as I am fully known.” (cf. I Cor. 13: 12)

      The deception was that that becoming like God entailed listening to, being deceived by, and obedient to a being, Satan, who was less than God; instead of listening to, being deified by, and in humility, obedient to God, Himself. In the Fall from Grace, the ‘dominion’ that God granted to Adam and Eve was lost to Satan, sin (Apollyon / Abaddon), and death (Sheol). Instead of being subject to God the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit, we became subject to the unholy trinity of Satan, sin, and death.

      The reality that God did want to make us partakers of His divinity is found in the trees of ‘the knowledge of good and evil’ (which God commanded we never eat from – and therefore it was always God’s intention that we would only know “good” directly from Him) and the tree of life / immortality. God therefore always desired that we be in His own ‘image and likeness’ by only knowing good directly from Him, eternally. In subjecting ourselves to Satan, sin, and death we fell from the grace of ‘immortal holiness’, the inability to sin, the freedom to only reflect God’s divinity.

    • rochespoint

      I now Jesus said; “as I am in the father and the father is in me let them be in us’
      The church is made up of many parts and we are supposed to be ‘one body’ – hasn’t quite come over like that to me as I have had a bad experience with dogmatic priests. Still we live and pray in hope!

    • shortyshappy

      Bob….I do agree with you. A red flag immediately went up. We are mere mortals. In this life we will ALWAYS be sinners. We are justified as being right before God through our faith in him. We are sanctified throughout our lifetime….it is an ongoing process….to become more and more ‘Christ like’. We will never become God because of our sinful nature (thank you Adam!). But….when the day comes that we are called ‘home’, we will be pure and sinless and ready to be in God’s presence. Santification will be completed! Amen! So in the meantime, we walk with Him, ‘strive’ to become more ‘Christlike’, and continue this journey in a land where we are not citizens.

      BTW…..God gave us ‘free will’….that means the ability to CHOOSE between good and evil. What we do with the ‘free will’ is up to us!

  • kayeloney@cox.net

    Jesus is the Divine Son of the Father He knew what his mission was coming to earth even in the womb of his Mother Mary. Pain and Suffering the Greatest Love story never told. Burning Love for souls, Jesus purified us in the fire of His Love. Have you never talked to a person in the consecrated life, how many of them (not all) speak of the burning fire within their Heart for the Holy Trinity. These are to true chosen ones, to show Christ Love in His Church, many are Saint’s. To undo the lie’s of Satan it took Jesus Life’s Blood, so we would have the Freedom to chose. That is WHY prayer is so important, the correct way to pray is to give your Human Will back to Jesus, and using His Divine Will to pray all things begin to come into place you are more strongly attached to The Holy Trinity and Mother Mary.

  • Edward J Clark

    It all adds up to a power struggle within ourselves. Note Jesus used God’s Word to overcome satan, which is something I need to practise and believe will work and be successful…faith is required here. Thank you Fr Barron, my pride/ego can always do with a good battering; spiritually healthy for sure.

  • Patricia

    It is evident that our Lord was tempted as a human being……and responded to this temptation as a human being can and should. The thing lacking in us is the resolve to do the same rejection. Our weakness is overcome by prayer and sacrifice, almsgiving and service. We can look to our Lady, and her quiet, hidden life with Jesus. Just taking care of the place that they shared as a family was her way. If we could just be as humble, we would be better able to overcome temptations.

  • Jon Rogers

    Like Bob McCoy, I too have trouble with the wording “become God”; I strongly prefer “attain perfect communion with God” or words to this effect.

    • grateful1

      I agree, Jon. “Become one with God” would also be correct (and would conform with Christ’s prayer that we be one as He and His heavenly Father are one).

  • Claire

    “Undoing the damage”

    These words became my personal mantra since I discovered the very dream of God for my life.

    Having been born in a particular dysfunctional family is not anybody’s choice…

    My parent got separated when I was 12. And this really shattered me and my dreams to pieces. For awhile, God had allowed me to feel the pain. Till I found myself one day looking at the CROSS where I discovered… Himself being abandoned…beaten…and completely broken. But His wounds were turned to a salvific LOVE…that is so powerful and encompassing that had saved and completed me. What happened to me could be so disheartening…but God had used such brokenness to manifest His very plan.

    By God’s grace I completed my studies taking BS Psychology…and has been allowing the Lord to use me as His instrument to reach out for the same broken souls…helping them make a difference in their lives.

    • Ester

      God bless you Claire. My heart smiles for You at this moment.

    • Ivon

      Your story is truly inspirational. God bless you Claire.

    • April H

      Brave Claire, Jesus is my hero too. Focusing on his obedience, faith, and trust instead of my own lifts me up every time…. Bless you on your journey!

    • lady2bug

      Thank you, Claire! My story is similar too but it has now become “HISstory!” You are a blessing!

    • LansingECJ

      Your story is a beautiful one! May it be a story that you use to evangelize others. That kind of evangelization is needed so much in the ministry done in our churches, when we have a chance to talk to our coworkers and we engage our families in conversation.

    • Elena Santivanez-Klausen

      God bless you Claire. People like you are the hands of God in our world.

    • alyce arends

      to learn this at such a young age and to be able to employ it in your life’s scheme, is less than amazing. You accepted His gift, His life and His death, and used it as it was meant. We all are meant to be instruments of His plan not only for ourselves but those we encounter in our life. Hold on to that special gift He has given you. You are a shining example of God’s LOve.

    • Elizabeth Ricci

      Claire thank you for your testimony. What a wonderful witness you are to those who have been traumatized as well as others here, including me, who have been traumatized by circumstances beyond our control.

    • Friend

      Great story, Claire. Thank you for sharing. The journey you personally experienced is EXACTLY the proof why sometimes “bad things happen for a reason”. Until one goes through the painful journey that, at times, we must all travel, then one may never experience that everything happens for a reason, and why our God, allows bad things to happen. Even though each and every person may not be personally affected by the outcome, someone, somewhere is in store for the wonderful revelation of God’s lesson, and reach salvation.

  • rtclovesmac

    This reflection raises for me two thoughts :
    Father you say the God became man so that man might become God….is this really what you meant. Words mean things and this phrase leads on into the false trap that we as people can become God…..Does the Church really teach this? Perhaps you meant God-like in our actions, but not God? WOF is a powerful witness to the Gospel. Some may take this literally.
    Please correct me if I am wrong.
    At the word of Jesus, even Satan must depart. True, but we must understand that he did not leave some of those around Him through whom was brought the Passion. We must always be on guard to recognize that all are being tempted to follow ways that are not of God.
    Lord, please send us Your Holy Spirit, to guard, guide and protect us, enabling us to discern that which You are asking us to do and be. But if we fail, or fall down as you did with your Cross, grant unto us, your forgiveness and mercy.
    Lord Jesus, I trust in You.

    • Janice K

      You might want to read what I posted above about the statement God became man etc. and click on the url address and read the rest of it.

      • rtclovesmac

        Janice K.
        The link sends me to a bunch of Bible study links. Not sure if that was your intent. I also could not find your comment. But thanks for taking the time to comment.
        With regards to the scripture , Mt 5:48, this is the last line in the Chapter which if read has nothing to do with becoming God, only God like in the way we love our neighbor. We are to follow His example to be like He is, not to become who He is.
        Similarly Paul asks us to be Imitators of him as he is an imitator of Christ….not to be Paul, but to be Christ-like in how we act toward one and other.

      • rtclovesmac

        Janet,
        I finally found your post and as I am studying the Catechism of the Catholic Church right now, I looked at paragraph 460….and the referenced paragraphs 1265, 1391, and 1988…and it does give me pause to reflect more deeply.
        St. Irenaeus states we become a son of God when we enter into communion with Christ.
        St. Thomas Aquinas asserts that wanted us to share in His divinity, so he assumed our nature so that he, who became man, might make men gods (little g).
        It is St. Athanasius that states that “…we might become God (Big G). But this is clarified in 1988 where St. Athanasius delves deeper into this assertion that “By the participation of the Spirit, we become communicants in the divine nature….For this reason, those in whom the Spirit dwells are divinized.
        When I see the Big G..God, I see the Blessed Trinity.
        As such, I do not see us on par with this aspect of God. However, if the Church is saying that because when we are in Heaven, we will be perfect as Christ is perfect, thus we will be aligned as one with the Trinity as Mary is , then I am OK with that….
        Otherwise if we become God (Big G), then certainly Mary would be in this realm and we as Catholics should be worshipping her as we do the Trinity, as to al the Saints that are in Heaven….this is the end state that I feel conflicts with the statement God became man so that man could become God.

        • Janice K

          Out you studying the Catechism by yourself or with a group. There is a online Catholic Catechism in a year. It is run by the Lighthouse ministry that produces all the CD’s and book etc that are in the churches. This is the website.

          http://www.flocknote.com It is a similiar layout as Fr Barron’s except the comments run consequently

          I wish there was a way to contact either Fr Barron or whoever runs this website and have them ask Father if he could explain this statement completely. Again thanks for you for you reply.

          • rtclovesmac

            My wife and I are studying with a group at Church.
            I too wish Father Barron would explain the Church’s teaching on this.
            The good thing is we are searching and God is leading.
            Peace

          • Janice K

            Try the CCC for a year it has people from all over the world, UK, NIgeria, Sinapore, Philippines Ireland and several other countries. Some who really know there faith and some who are like you just beginning your journey. It is amazing what you learn. I did things like you in the church and learned a lot but I have really learned even more from this group by Lighthouse. May you and you wife have a wonderful journey.

  • The Crimson Surgeon

    Father, I understand the impact of the message, but early you state that “God became man that man might become God!” This is disturbing to me. Don’t you mean that ‘man might become ‘like’ God??? I see that many others on this comment page have the same concern. Thanks

  • Chris

    Perhaps the most difficult task we face aside from recognizing God’s presence in our daily lives. Peace.

  • Dude_Abides

    ah good stuff! Thanks again Fr. Barron. A bit of synchronicity here, as we covered this part of Jesus’ life in my Thursday night’s Bible study meetup. After reading this, I went back and re-read Chap 3 of the Venerable Fulton Sheen’s book “The Life of Christ” – The Three Shortcuts From The Cross.

    For the earlier comments of some who are a bit troubled by the use of the sentence “God became man that man might BECOME God”, which I too was a bit uneasy about this concept. It actually is part of church dogma and the origin of this quote is from none other than St. Athanasius! please reference the terms: theosis, deification and divinization.

    C.S. Lewis understood the concept of ‘man becoming God’ – from his book “Mere Christianity” (pg 174)
    The command “Be ye perfect” is not idealistic gas. Nor is it a command to do the impossible. He is going to make us into creatures that can obey that command. He said (in the Bible) that we were “gods” and He is going to make good His words. If we let Him—for we can prevent Him, if we choose—He will make the feeblest and filthiest of us into a god or goddess, dazzling, radiant, immortal creatures, pulsating all through with such energy and joy and wisdom and love as we cannot now imagine, a bright stainless mirror which reflects back to Him perfectly (though, of course, on a smaller scale) His own boundless power and delight and goodness. The process will be long and in parts very painful; but that is what we are in for. Nothing less. He meant what he said.

    God bless you all, peace.

    • Andi O

      Thanks Dude, Your words ring with truth. Research has proven the Eucharist to be human heart cells, and when I as a Catholic let it enter into me, then I think of Mary,who in all humility said yes to carry Jesus in her. The cells enter mingled with ours, which I believe is the way God made us. So in all humility we too carry God in us, not for power, or ego, but in humility as to be Him to others. To let others see God in us, and as we believe God is love, we too should be love working as Our Blessed Mother is working bringing her son, our Lord closer to each of us.

      God be with you, A O

      • Dude_Abides

        Beautifully stated A O,
        and AMEN my brother!

      • Elizabeth Villota

        Andi O
        You simplicity is refreshing, child like faith comes to my mind, trust, humility and the unconditional love. I myself was trouble by ” that man might become godlike”, that I had to ask my 19 year old daughter, God call us to make right choices, by trusting his commands and having a relationship with him. Letting God be the center of your life. We can not do this alone, and we are not alone, with have his wisdom,thought the Holy Spirit, his protection, his love. Thank you for your thoughts

  • chuck

    God is Love.So Man can indeed become God(love).

    • Nancy

      Chuck – simple, but totally perfect words.

    • Elizabeth Ricci

      The essence of Love is God! God is Love. So Man can indeed become God (love).Well said Chuck

    • quisutDeusmpc

      “Be ye perfect as your heavenly Father is perfect.” Matt. 5: 48

      “There is no fear in love, but perfect love drives out fear because fear has to do with punishment, and so one who fears is not yet perfect in love.” I John 4: 18

  • C. Wayne Childers

    My devotional journey for lent. Temptation brings out the best in the case of Jesus but brings out the worst in our case.

  • Patty Hughes

    In times of trouble and temptation, O Lord, I shall call upon your name. Save us, O Lord!!

  • Marcia Maurer

    I was initially disturbed by the phrase, …”man might be like God.” I am reminded however, that in Genesis humans were made in the Image and Likeness of God. We tend to think of that resemblance in human/flesh terms. It seems to be much deeper than that. We are made to be above the fray, Holy, resistant to evil, and always reaching for good (Rahner). When viewed like this, we are reminded what an awesome responsibility we have to be made in the Image and Likeness of God. Therefore, as Jesus, the human, prayed and sought for the “meaning” and “purpose” in HIs life, it is not erroneous of HIm to realize He is called to be like God and thus we as well.

    Marcia

  • April H

    I have heard – just tell the Devil to get behind you, or leave me Devil – and I thought to myself, this is just a little hokey and too simple to actually work. I was wrong. LOVE to ALL this morning!

  • William John Meegan

    Father Barron says in his lectures that every Catholic is a Christ and I think that what he meant in his above statement that “God became man so man can become God”. Man (ego-consciousness) can become Christ-consciousness only when he is beheaded.

  • Ivon

    As Catholics, we should be able to discern what is literal and figurative. We are to become like God. This phrase is used all the time in Catholicism. This is why we’re “practicing” our faith.

  • G & K Reisert

    New Age philosophy is that we can become God….Maybe you meant God-like? A BIG red flag went up for us when we read this.

  • lady2bug

    Father, in Luke 4:13, the gospel adds this statement: “When the devil had finished every temptation, he left Him until an opportune time.” It is such good news indeed that Satan must depart at the word of Jesus, but he does come back, and back, and back, and like a roaring lion seeking to devour those who belong to God. We are in constant warfare until the day we die and must never forget to keep up our guard and use the weapons of MASS…..destruction!

  • Joseph Briones Jr.

    I too was confused about the whole “become God ” sentence. The other one that caused concern was that when Jesus was baptized, it was then He “realized” what He was to do for His purpose and mission. How’s that possible for He is God, and He knew his plan all along? It wasn’t a surprise to Him. Please explain.

    • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

      Joseph,

      When Jesus took on a human body, “He emptied Himself” or you might say, put aside His Divinity. He had to experience the fully meaning and reality of being human. To “hold on to His Divinity” in any degree would limit His ability to feel, the full effect of all that is human.Because He is God He can do this! don’t try to figure it out because it is a matter of Faith. Also, remember there are three Person’s so you might say the Father was in control as was the Holy Spirit to protect and nourish the Son’s “human Nature to the fullest! This was essential in the respect that Jesus needed the whole and complete “experience of what we feel and all our vulnerabilities “except sin”. He knew what sin did to us, but in a matter of speaking, it is a different thing to experience the pain, the suffering, the happy times and the sorrow we all feel.

      Hope this helps!

      Peace and joy,

      The Prayer Warrior

      • grateful1

        The Church does not teach that Christ ever “put aside His divinity,” let alone that “holding on to His Divinity in any degree” would have “limited His ability to feel the full effect” of His humanity. Rather, the Church teaches that Christ’s existence is a “hypostatic union” of humanity and divinity. See newadvent.org’s discussion of “the revealed truth that in Christ one person subsists in two natures, the Divine and the human,” and that this “was definitively established by the Council of Chalcedon (451), which declared that in Christ the two natures, each retaining its own properties, are united in one subsistence and one person.”

        • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

          Grateful 1,

          I do not question the ” hydrostatic union ” but I was trying to define what I meant by “Christ emptied Himself”. What I should have said was that He emptied Himself of His Will, in His human Nature, that He might do the Will of the Father. I understand the hypostatic union, that The Son, Second Person of the Blessed Trinity, is totally Divine and totally human but I can no more explain it than I can tell you what a legion of holy angels look like, even though I have seen them.
          Thank you for bringing that to my attention.

          Peace,

          The Prayer Warrior

          • grateful1

            Yes, now I understand your point, Prayer Warrior. Thanks for helping me, and have a blessed Lent.

      • Janice K

        Good explanation Peace and joy to you.

    • Madzi

      Perhaps if we take the word, “realized” and understand it to mean, “made it become a reality,” Father’s words make more sense.

  • Marcus Ritosa

    Have I been tempted in this way recently? Where was I tempted to put my desires, or my pride, or my power ahead of serving? This morning I had a plan, and instead, I know by conscience I am called to care for my wife who is sick. It is not my selfish desire to help her, it does little for my pride (as there is no great feat to accomplish), and it certainly does not entitle me to exert more power over her or over anyone. Service, to family, to parish, to community is the antidote that Jesus shows us, both in Matthew 25 and John’s account of the last supper.

  • Teri Wetter

    Father Barron, I enjoy the pep talks very much. Today though I was bothered by your second sentence, “God became man that man might become God.” The word “might” really bothered me when I know Jesus is God. Could you explain better what you meant by this sentence in your reflections?

    • Janice K

      Read above what I posted and click on the url address provided Also he is another website that also explains.

      http://www.askacatholic.com/_WebPostings/Answers/2008_07JULY/2008JulyHowCanMenBecomeGod.cfm

      • Teri Wetter

        Read your link, still don’t agree with statement.

        • Janice K

          So you disagree with the following two saints of the early church

          “God became man so that man might become a god.” (cf. St.
          Athanasius, De Incarnatione or On the Incarnation 54:3, PG 25:192B;
          also Catechism of the Catholic Church paragraph 460)

          This has been a consistent
          teaching of the Fathers and even St. Thomas Aquinas. According to
          Aquinas, the Son is the Eternal Wisdom and “man is perfected in wisdom
          (which is his proper perfection, as he is rational) by participating
          [in] the Word of God” (ST III, q. 3. a. 8) and that the reason
          for the Incarnation is for”the full participation of the Divinity, which is the true
          bliss of man and end of human life; and this is bestowed upon us by
          Christ’s humanity; for Augustine says in a sermon (xiii de
          Temp): ‘God was made man, that man might be made God’ ”

          http://www.biblicalcatholic.co

          Here is another website that might help.

          http://www.askacatholic.com/_W

          • Teri Wetter

            Don’t misinterprete what I said. I don’t agree with the sentence, and I don’t care who said it or who cited it. There is a difference with the use of God and god. One false the other our creator.

          • Teri Wetter

            Don’t misinterpret what I said. I don’t agree with the sentence, don’t care who said it or who cited it.

      • Teri Wetter

        Everyone who has commented on my response have brought up other fragments to support the statement I disagree with: “God became man that man might become God.” I have a problem with this because it reminds me of what the devil said to Eve in the garden of Eden. The serpent tempted Eve that it she ate the forbidden fruit her eyes would be opened and she would be like God knowing good from evil. From the beginning man has tried to be God, which brought the downfall of mankind. We can become part of the body of Christ, but I don’t believe we will become God! There is only one God.

        • Janice K

          If you will scroll down to Florence Outzs she has put down what a Bob’s statement is and it is a very good explanation of what this statement means. It doesn’t mean that we are God. Please read what she said and if this doesn’t help speak to a priest preferably one with a theology degree. I don’t know if you are aware that Jesus lives in us through the Holy Spirit and we are the Temple of the HS. That doesn’t mean that we are God (Jesus is God) it is just that we become Christlike and he lives in us.

          This comes from Wikipedia:

          In Christian theology, divinization (deification, making divine, or theosis) is the transforming effect of divine grace,[1]
          the spirit of God, or the atonement of Christ. It literally means to
          become more divine, more like God, or take upon a divine nature.

          You might want to scroll down this webpage and read about what the other early church fathers said and what the Roman Catholic teaching is about it.

          http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Divinization_%28Christian%29

          Here is something from what St John Paul II wrote it comes from the Vatican. I hope this helps

          http://w2.vatican.va/content/john-paul-ii/en/encyclicals/documents/hf_jp-ii_enc_18051986_dominum-et-vivificantem.html

      • Teri Wetter

        Depending on background anyone can interrupt a sentence into different meanings. It is the wording of this sentence: “God became man that man might become God.”

        • Janice K

          The Early church fathers I believe and St Paul (if you read what I sent) because they are inspired by the Holy Spirit and they also some of them died for what they believed (there were 12 early church doctors who spoke on this). That is why they are Saints. If you click on the websites I sent and read those words will make sense

          • Teri Wetter

            Janice it is the wording of the sentence with the point being you should not need a background in theology to understand a sentence.

  • Judith A. Speer McKenna

    “Undoing the damage” I like this pharsing. As I refected on this pharse Reconciliation comes to me. Through this Sacarment you can start “Undoing the damage.” This is the beauty of this Sacarment. It’s not easy but God wants us to heal and Satan does not.

  • Nancy

    It struck me in this reflection that Jesus went to the desert right after His Baptism, recognized His identity and mission, then was ready to confront the temptations of Satan. So we, too, should recognize in our Baptism our identity and mission, and be ready to confront our own temptations in life. Without Baptism and the call to discipleship, we would flounder around in life, living without an awareness of temptation, good and evil. I pray that I gain strength during this Lenten season, and always, from the time Jesus spent in the desert.

    • Dude_Abides

      Sounds like you have described much of my adult life, Nancy. As I have just recently come back to my beloved Lord & Church… like the Prodigal Son.

  • disqus_4tbAnXuWTH

    “At the word of Jesus, even Satan must depart. Let us remember that fact when we are tempted by the Great Deceiver.”

    Do I allow Jesus to speak thru me?

    • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

      “D”,

      You can, but you can tell the evil one “In Jesus Holy Name, get behind me!” You can also ask Jesus to get the evil one off your back and out of your head.
      It is powerful when you ask Jesus to help you.

      Peace and joy,

      The Prayer Warrior

  • Monica Chagoya

    always the same things: wealth, Pleasure. Power and Honor: WPPH

  • http://holyspirithaitimission.org Bob McCoy

    I appreciate John and Elizabeth and Val comments and agree that we are to become God (like) as John said, but not God. What happens in heaven will certainly be more glorious than on earth, but my focus is on earth right now and trying to make sure I don’t follow in Eve’s path. I stand by my original comments. Grace and peace.

  • Kerry

    I’m confused by the line, “God became man that msn might become God.”

    • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

      Kerry,

      William had a good point. We must take on the mind of Christ, Our Lord and not let our our ego’s rule our actions. Jesus showed and taught us, if you follow His journey from His baptism to His death, it was not about Him. He constantly ried to avoid bringing attention to Himself but continually spoke of the Father’s Love and compassion for us. He showed us what was necessary to be holy even at the expense of His life. He taught us of how much the Father loves us and cares for us though at times it may not appear that way. He wanted us to understand that the Father understood what we were going through and that He was not a distant diety who set the universe in motion and forgot us.We strive to be Christ-like, and Christ is not only man but God. To be like God means to strive to be holy not to become God. Jesus came as a “servant” and that is what we must continue to be, a servant to other less fortunate than us. To help others without thought of reward but to understand the joy of helping another.

      Hope that helps!
      Peace and joy,

      The Prayer Warrior

      • Susanrose✨

        Hello my Friend
        Beautiful said, is why God became man to show us how much he love us
        and man might become God not to be a God but to strive to be Holy
        Thank you

        JMJ

    • Janice K

      Here is a good explanation of what is being discussed about man being God:

      Musings on Theosis or Divinization: “God
      became man so that man might become a god”

      The early Church had many battles with those who deny Jesus’ divinity.
      Because they defended His divinity they had the chance to meditate on
      what it means for the Logos to become man. One of the great riches that
      came from their meditations was the teaching that

      “God became man so that man might become a god.” (cf. St.
      Athanasius, De Incarnatione or On the Incarnation 54:3, PG 25:192B;
      also Catechism of the Catholic Church paragraph 460)

      This may sound weird at first because Christianity is a
      monotheistic religion and this means that there can be no other God than
      the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob:

      “Hear, O Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord alone!”
      (Deuteronomy 6:4)

      Both the Christians and the heretics held to this doctrine in
      the early days of the Church. The Christians wanted to pass on the
      apostolic tradition that the Logos was God and became flesh
      (John 1:1,14) and at the same time keep the doctrine that there
      is only one God. The heretics tried to limit mystery and couldn’t
      understand how there can be three Persons in one God. They put a lot of
      effort in trying to understand the relationship between God and Jesus
      Christ while, like the faithful Christians, keeping the doctrine that
      there is only one God. This led them to assert many erroneous views such
      as Jesus being a creature or that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are
      only “modes” of the one true God. By the power of the Holy Spirit, the
      Church has faithfully kept the apostolic faith that there are three
      Persons in one God and rejected the heretics’ erroneous views.

      Because the Church Fathers believed that the Logos became flesh,
      this means that the nature of God and the nature of man are united in
      one Person. What does this imply? One of the answers is that man can be
      divinized (cf. 2 Peter 1:4; 1 John 3:1-3). This does not mean
      that man’s nature changes into the nature of God. This simply means that
      man can partake in the divine nature of God. This has been a consistent
      teaching of the Fathers and even St. Thomas Aquinas. According to
      Aquinas, the Son is the Eternal Wisdom and “man is perfected in wisdom
      (which is his proper perfection, as he is rational) by participating
      [in] the Word of God” (ST III, q. 3. a. 8) and that the reason
      for the Incarnation is for

      “the full participation of the Divinity, which is the true
      bliss of man and end of human life; and this is bestowed upon us by
      Christ’s humanity; for Augustine says in a sermon (xiii de
      Temp): ‘God was made man, that man might be made God’ ”
      (ST III, q. 1 a. 2).

      http://www.biblicalcatholic.co

      Mt 5:48 Be you therefore perfect, as also your heavenly Father is perfect.

      • Kerry

        Thank you! That helped.

  • Gary

    If we profess to be Christians, we are representatives of Christ. We are in the world, but not of the world. We are a consecrated people, set apart from the world. We are to walk, talk and act like Christ and be the light (Christ) of the world. We are commissioned by Jesus to go out and spread the good news by showing our love and commitment to the Lord Jesus Christ. The greatest temptation of this modern era is to conform to the world, and it is a very strong temptation. Jesus quoted from the scriptures each time he was tempted. He called attention to his Father. Your identity is in Christ. He will lead you to the Father who has a mansion waiting for you. You need to ask yourself. Am I committed to what Jesus calls me to be, or am I just a nominal Christian going through the motions of being a Christian? You cannot be a lukewarm Christian. Jesus says he will spew you out of his mouth. Get serious with God. Conversion is necessary for salvation.

  • Barbara Ann Baugh

    I have reflected on this reflection for several hours. I feel that now I must write my thoughts down disjointed as they might be. I have been read in the Bible and have drawn several parallels. In this reflection Jesus goes into a desolate garden the wilderness. There He is tempted by Satan and He answers Satan with a resounded NO using quotes from scripture. Then Satan retreats. Luke tells us that Satan doesn’t really give up
    Luke 4:12
    And Jesus answered him, “It is said, ‘You shall not tempt the Lord your God.’” 13 And when the devil had ended every temptation, he departed from him until an opportune time.
    The wilderness is not yet a garden
    At the end of His public ministry, Jesus must enter the Garden again this time it is Gethsemane. The garden is beautiful and fruitful but it is not yet ready for man, It lacks the Tree of Life. Here Jesus must complete the repair. He must submit his humanity to God’s will. Jesus brings three witnessed to represents us. Sadly they fall asleep. Jesus is betrayed in that garden and goes to the Cross, The Tree of Life.

  • Greg

    That I may diminish and He become More. That I may disappear and all that remains is Him. If I see Father’s “that man might become God.” We are called to this impossible mission of who to be. We blind little begger children can seek at Our Daddy’s knée to become Daddy. A bit simplistic perhaps. The Physician is in!

  • Albert Kerns

    Fr. Barron,
    Did not Luke say the devil left Him “for a while”? Matthew says only that He was ministered to by angels, as does Mark, and John does not discuss it. Your opinion? Al Kerns

  • Vivian Madu

    Give us the strengthen, courage and grace to share in your victory over the devil. May your name be glorified now and forevermore! Mother of our Devine mercy pray for us!

  • alyce arends

    The words of St. Francis come to me, as I am thinking of today’s message. The human side of God, Jesus Christ, is such an example of strength and love. Not one word is ever of violence, hatred, retaliation, jealousy comes from His mouth, Just LOVE. Be not one of the crowd, going along with the sins of the time, be as strong as you can to resist and do it for Love of God. .Hard to do in today’s times, but if we remember His crucifixion, and His death and why it happened , we will get the grace to overcome the temptations thrown in our path.. Love God as He loved the world, He will give us the grace to fight off Satan. It is all about Love

    • Susanrose✨

      Alyce,
      So true, Grace! Without it we can not do anything..
      Throught the Power of the Holy Spirit we must overcome our weakness
      When we stumble and fall, dust ourselves off
      And give thanks for the Lord is so Good and Merciful, for he makes all things new again.

      Peace,
      JMJ

  • Virginia Huntsman

    “God became man that man might become God”. I need some clarification here. That WE might become God? I understand that if it means becoming perfect like our heavenly Father, but this is very specific and feels very Mormon in theology. What does that exactly mean, Father Barron? Thank you!

  • Aimee

    Thank you so much for your very insightful reflections; they have been blessing me!! May God bless you and your ministry.

  • Janice K

    Here is a good explanation of what is being discussed about man being God:

    Musings on Theosis or Divinization: “God
    became man so that man might become a god”

    The early Church had many battles with those who deny Jesus’ divinity.
    Because they defended His divinity they had the chance to meditate on
    what it means for the Logos to become man. One of the great riches that
    came from their meditations was the teaching that

    “God became man so that man might become a god.” (cf. St.
    Athanasius, De Incarnatione or On the Incarnation 54:3, PG 25:192B;
    also Catechism of the Catholic Church paragraph 460)

    This may sound weird at first because Christianity is a
    monotheistic religion and this means that there can be no other God than
    the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob:

    “Hear, O Israel! The Lord is our God, the Lord alone!”
    (Deuteronomy 6:4)

    Both the Christians and the heretics held to this doctrine in
    the early days of the Church. The Christians wanted to pass on the
    apostolic tradition that the Logos was God and became flesh
    (John 1:1,14) and at the same time keep the doctrine that there
    is only one God. The heretics tried to limit mystery and couldn’t
    understand how there can be three Persons in one God. They put a lot of
    effort in trying to understand the relationship between God and Jesus
    Christ while, like the faithful Christians, keeping the doctrine that
    there is only one God. This led them to assert many erroneous views such
    as Jesus being a creature or that the Father, Son, and Holy Spirit are
    only “modes” of the one true God. By the power of the Holy Spirit, the
    Church has faithfully kept the apostolic faith that there are three
    Persons in one God and rejected the heretics’ erroneous views.

    Because the Church Fathers believed that the Logos became flesh,
    this means that the nature of God and the nature of man are united in
    one Person. What does this imply? One of the answers is that man can be
    divinized (cf. 2 Peter 1:4; 1 John 3:1-3). This does not mean
    that man’s nature changes into the nature of God. This simply means that
    man can partake in the divine nature of God. This has been a consistent
    teaching of the Fathers and even St. Thomas Aquinas. According to
    Aquinas, the Son is the Eternal Wisdom and “man is perfected in wisdom
    (which is his proper perfection, as he is rational) by participating
    [in] the Word of God” (ST III, q. 3. a. 8) and that the reason
    for the Incarnation is for

    “the full participation of the Divinity, which is the true
    bliss of man and end of human life; and this is bestowed upon us by
    Christ’s humanity; for Augustine says in a sermon (xiii de
    Temp): ‘God was made man, that man might be made God’ ”
    (ST III, q. 1 a. 2).

    http://www.biblicalcatholic.com/apologetics/a124.htm

    Mt 5:48 Be you therefore perfect, as also your heavenly Father is perfect.

    • http://www.irishmike.org/ Michael Lee Cornwell

      Janice,
      Very well said…………thank you!

      Peace and joy,

      The Prayer Warrior

      • Janice K

        Your welcome. God gave me a gift of finding the right things at the right time :) God Bless

  • Maureen Sullivan Bacon

    What do you mean by “that man might become God”, that sounds like New Age or better yet, blasphemous!

    • DianaFeb

      Yes, I was wondering about that as well, Maureen.

  • Susanrose✨

    It’s only through the Power of the Holy Spirit who reveals to us what is of God, and what’s not of God..
    When temptation comes our way and we recognize it,
    We can say with the Power of the Holy Spirit and with Faith, as Jesus said, Get away, Satan! It is written: ‘The Lord, your God, shall you worship and him alone shall you serve.’”At every point in the Gospels, we are meant to identify with Jesus…..

  • Mary Cimiluc

    I love today’s Reflection Father and am reminded of how much time could have been saved by the great philosophers if they had drawn from The Word. Thank you so much~

  • http://holyspirithaitimission.org Bob McCoy

    Funny Grateful I got that same sense.

  • Kerry

    And what about Fr. Barron’s comments that imply that Jesus had to figure out how he was going to respond to Satan? Didn’t seem quite right.

    • joanw

      I had the same thought. I’m uncomfortable with “He has just learned his deepest identity and mission,” as He didn’t know before that.

  • Lon Pirkl

    Satan is still ruling the secular world. Satan said to Jesus that he would give Jesus ” All of this” which would be all nations and power. So to me that means Satan owns the secular world. I don’t mean the cosmos, I mean the world apart from God.

  • Jon Rogers

    I like your (and His!) simpler wording: become one with God”!!

  • Marjorie Keppel

    I aways believed that God became man and man became God, referred to Jesus becoming man and being God at the same
    time, showing us that we are made in the image of God and teaching us to strive to be like Him.

  • http://holyspirithaitimission.org Bob McCoy

    I agree we are destined toward pure love. God is pure love and all things are possible through God, but we will never become God. To even think this is blasphemous. Jesus does not count in this argument. Yes He bcame human to save my soul for which I will eternally grateful and I will one day be in union with Him as I am with the Eucharist, but I will never be God as Jesus is. I depend on the Trinity, but I will never be the Trinity. I may be a part of the Trinity as the body of Christ, but I will never BECOME God, Jesus or the Trinity. This is what whoever wrote the Lenten message said today and I believe them to be wrong. So I am focusing. I’m focusing on being as loving as possible which is a far cry from being God.

  • christine

    After being baptized- Jesus just learns his deepest identity and mission? I don’t think that is right. Jesus knew who He was, always did, always will. It makes it sound as if He just discovered He was the Son of God!

  • Cynthia

    I too was struck by the phrase :” man can become God” – it made me sit up and ponder for a while. Then I remembered that the Symbolon DVDs demonstrated through teaching of our Salvation history how Jesus, God made man, reestablished our relationship with God by his suffering and death on the Cross. He made it possible for us to become Godly in the way we live our lives. So I really liked how you expressed this reality Father. Great thought provoking thoughts so far. I look forward to my daily readings. Thank you

  • Benigne Dohms

    The second sentence: “God became man that man might become God.” Where does the Catechism teach that we can become God? That sounds like something the Mormons would teach!

  • Ivan Boudreau

    Thank you Father Robert Barron, it is so vitally important that we reflect on our beliefs and teachings at this so very important season of Lent. My viewing your articles has enhanced my ability to focus and concentrate of our Savior’s message, may our LORD continue to give you strength and wisdom to walk in HIS Light.
    God Bless,
    Vivat Jesus,
    Ivan Boudreau

  • B.Aven

    Repeating “Jesus rescues, Jesus saves.” Is my prayer when I recognize that I am being tempted.

  • Rosemary Hester Studer

    I am not of the Catholic faith but I believe God became “like” us that we might become”like” Him. 11 Corinthians 5:21.”For our sake he made him to be sin who knew no sin that in him we might become the righteousness of God “. I believe this is what you mean.

  • Norma

    We should be alert to all the temptations, Christ should be at the center of our lives, we should be always wearing the armor of God.

  • Kathy Emrich

    In Jesus’ responses to Satan’s offers, he “reverses the momentum”. As I visualize the encounter, we see Jesus closing the door to any further suggestions from the evil one. That’s a great example for us to follow. There is no need to ever enter into conversation with Satan…we need to get into the habit of closing the door on him. No further discussion needed – the conversation is over… That will become part of my Lenten exercises this year. Thanks Father!

  • Dolly Faust

    In addition to the reiteration of the quote from St. Augustine which has been much commented upon here, I have difficulty with the second sentence of the second paragraph, “He has just learned His deepest identity and mission . . . “. Is the implication here that Jesus the Lord of the universe did not know His identity and mission before His baptism? That concept is unfathomable and contradicts my understanding of Christ in His Divinity. I hope I am misunderstanding what was written.

    • Roland Benoit

      At the end of the day, I reflect on God’s unfathomable love for me. I am still discovering that I am loved even in my miserable failure to love as I should, to live as I should. Called to mission I am called to unity with Christ, God. the Holy Spirit. Can I find the words to explain all this for all…I think not, faith must be constantly seeking understanding. There is always more to discover in the journey toward love.

      • Dolly Faust

        This is well-said. Roland. Thank you so much for replying to my comment.

  • Yolanda

    Father help undue the damage done in me. Help me to resist temptation and to always turn to You.

  • Pintoj

    Is Fr. Barron going to participate in these discussions? It would be helpful as we can all speculate on the meaning of his words but it would be better if he clarified his words himself.

  • Rosemary Tuite

    It has never occurred to me that Jesus didn’t know the plan! Those questions, What does God want me to do? Who does God want me to be? How is he to live his life? Jesus is God the Son, I am confused?