Resources   The Roland JV & XP Synthesizer FAQ

Version 2.17 2000-Nov-6

This is the general FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) list for the series of Roland JV and XP synthesizers. It is a condensed form of the "net-knowledge" from various Roland synth users on the internet. Most of this information came from the author, and users on the JV1080 mailing list and JV80 mailing list.

 

Legal Notices:
This document is Copyright (c) 1996-2000 by the author, David Peters. No part of this document may be reproduced in any commercial publication by any means - graphic, electronic, or mechanical, including photocopying, recording, taping, or storage in an information retrieval system without prior written permission of the copyright holder. It may however be freely redistributed in its entirety for non-profit use provided that it is not modified in any way, and this copyright notice is attached.

Any errors in this document are unintentional, and any expenses or inconveniences incurred as a consequence of their interpretation are not the responsibility of the author.

The Roland logo, logos and names of their equipment and accessories are trademarks and copyrighted by Roland Corporation. This FAQ is meant as an information source for other Roland synthesizer users, and people who wish to find out more about these Roland products. The author has no official affiliation with Roland whatsoever.

Terms Used:

The term "synths" in this document is used as an abbreviation for any of the JV/XP synthezisers.

The synths are also put into three groups: 6A family, 46 family and GS family. See question 2.1 for an explanation of these terms.

 
 
Table of Contents
 
Sections that are marked with **New** have been changed recently.
1.0 FAQ Information
1.1 What is the purpose of this FAQ?
1.2 Where can I get a copy of this FAQ?
1.3 Where do I send a change or addition to the FAQ?

2.0 Technical Information
2.1 What synths are in the JV/XP family?
2.2 Technical Specifications:
2.2.1 JV-30 Technical Specifications?
2.2.2 JV-35 Technical Specifications?
2.2.3 JV-50 Technical Specifications?
2.2.4 JV-80 Technical Specifications?
2.2.5 JV-880 Technical Specifications?
2.2.6 JV-90 Technical Specifications?
2.2.7 JV-1000 Technical Specifications?
2.2.8 JV-1080 Technical Specifications?
2.2.9 JV-2080 Technical Specifications?
2.2.10 XP-10 Technical Specifications?
2.2.11 XP-50 Technical Specifications?
2.2.12 XP-60 Technical Specifications?
2.2.13 XP-80 Technical Specifications?
2.3 What are the differences between the JV-1080 and XP-50?
2.4 What are the differences between the XP-80 and XP-50?
2.5 What are the differences between the JV-2080 and JV-1080?
2.6 How do I find out what my ROM version is?
2.7 What is the current ROM/CPU version for my synth?
2.8 How can I recalibrate the bender/sliders on the XP-50?
2.9 How can I recalibrate the bender/sliders on the XP-80?

3.0 Expanding the Synths
3.1 How can I add more waveforms/patches to my synth?
3.2 What Expansion boards are available? **New**
3.3 What PCM cards are available?
3.4 What data cards are available?

4.0 Synth Terminology and SysEx
4.1 What's the difference between a waveform, tone, patch, performance, bank etc?
4.2 What is User, Preset, Internal and Temporary memory?
4.3 What is SYSEX?
4.4 How do I create SYSEX message for a JV/XP synth?
4.5 How can I send a SYSEX file to my synth?
4.6 How do I calculate SYSEX checksums properly?

5.0 Making Music!
5.1 Can I assign a different effects to each part in a Performance? **New**
5.2 Why does a Patch sound different in Performance mode?
5.3 What is the best piano sound I can get?
5.4 What patch editors/librarians are available? **New**
5.5 How can I change into Performance/Patch/GM mode at the beginning of my song?
5.6 Can I have more than one Rhythm Kit in a Performance? **New**
5.7 Are there some examples of JV/XP synthesizer music on the Net? **New**

6.0 Tips & Tricks
6.1 How can I reset the User memory to the Factory Presets?
6.2 Why does the sound stop when changing patches?
6.3 Why does the disk drive light stay on (XP's)?
6.4 Can I stop the Play light from flashing (XP's)?
6.5 Does the JV-2080 have a test mode?

7.0 Where to Obtain More Information
7.1 Is there a Mailing list for the 6A Family synths?
7.2 Is there a Mailing list for the 46 Family synths?
7.3 Is there a Mailing list for the GS Family synths?
7.4 Is there a FTP site for the JV/XP synths?
7.5 Is there a news group for the JV/XP synths?
7.6 How can I contact Roland from the Internet?
7.7 Is there an IRC channel for the JV/XP Synths?
7.8 What WWW sites have information for JV and XP synths?

8.0 Credits
 
 
Section 1 - FAQ INFORMATION
 
 
1.1 What is the purpose of this FAQ?
This is the general FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions) list for the Roland JV and XP series synths. This includes the JV-30, JV-35, JV-50, JV-80, JV-880, JV-90, JV-1000, JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-10, XP-50, XP-60 and XP-80 synthesizers. It is a condensed form of the "net-knowledge" from various Roland synth users on the internet. Most of this information came from the author, users on the JV1080 mailing list and JV80 Mailing list.

I hope by providing this FAQ it will help reduce the number of common questions in the two mailing lists, allowing the 500+ members of the lists to concentrate on more specific topics. Also, I hope that this will be an excellent starters guide to the new JV/XP owner, answering any common questions they might have, and even answer some questions they haven't even thought of!

At this point most of the questions in this FAQ are related to the JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-50, XP-60 & XP-80 synthesizers. This is mainly due to the large amount of users of these synthesizers on the net. Future versions of this FAQ will hopefully contain more information about the other synthesizers as information becomes available.

 

1.2 Where can I get a copy of this FAQ?
This document is available at: http://www.frisbee.net.au/jv/resources/jv_xpfaq.html

 

1.3 Where do I send a change or addition to the FAQ?
Updates, additions, corrections, feedback etc. can be E-mailed to dpeters@frisbee.net.au

 

 
Section 2 - TECHNICAL INFORMATION
 
 
2.1 What synthesizers are in the JV/XP family?
The synthesizers in the JV/XP family can be catergorized into 3 groups:

GS Family: This family is the 'entry level' JV & XP synths. They are all mostly GM/GS compatible instruments. The synthesizers in this family are: JV-30, JV-35, JV-50 & XP-10.
46 Family: This family is leaning more towards the professional end. These synths were the predecessors of the 6A family synths. The synthesizers in this family are: JV-80, JV-880, JV-90 & JV-1000.
6A Family: This family is the 'top end' of the JV/XP range. All these synths have 64 note polyphony, take 4 or more expansion boards and have better EFX. The synthesizers in this family are: JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-50, XP-60 & XP-80.

GS Family (In order of creation):
JV-30 Multitimbral Synthesizer
Released: Early 1992
Discontinued: Mid 1994 replaced by the JV-35

JV-35 Expandable Synthesizer
Released: Mid 1994??
Discontinued: Early 1995?? replaced by the XP-10
New keyboard to replace the JV-30. More memory/features. Can take a VE-JV1 expansion board which gives it JV-80/1000 sounds or a VE-GS1 board which doubles polyphony to 56 voices.

JV-50 Expandable Synthesizer
Released: Mid 1994??
Discontinued: 1997 or before??
Same as the JV-35 but also has an onboard sequencer.

XP-10 Multitimbral Synthesizer
Released: Early 1995??
Discontinued: Still Current
The new entry level XP GS synth. Replaces the JV-35. Has more memory and an appegiator.

46 Family (In order of creation):
JV-80 Multitimbral Synthesizer
Released: Jan 1992
Discontinued: Mid 1994 replaced by the JV-90
Pretty much the grand-daddy keyboard of the family and still an excellent synth by today's standards. (I still own one)

JV-880 Multitimbral Synthesizer Module
Released: Mid 1992??
Discontinued: Mid 1994 replaced by the JV-1080
The rack module version of the JV-80.

JV-1000 Music Workstation
Released: Mid 1993
Discontinued: Mid 1994??
A workstation:- larger version of the JV-80 with a built in sequencer (similar to MC-50mkII) and more memory/features.

JV-90 Expandable Synthesizer
Released: Early 1994
Discontinued: Late 1994?? superceeded by the XP-50
The successor of the JV-80. More memory/features.

6A Family (In order of creation):
JV-1080 Super JV Synthesizer Module
Released: Mid 1994
Discontinued: Still current but the JV-2080 is really its successor.
The new JV module to replace the JV-880. Much more memory/features. Has some of the features from the successful JD-990 module.

XP-50 Music Workstation
Released late 1994
Discontinued: February 1998. Replaced by XP-60.
It is a bit like a JV-1080 with a keyboard and a sequencer. (See section 2.3 for differences from the JV-1080)

XP-80 Music Workstation
Released: Early 1996
Discontinued: Still a current model.
A bigger better XP-50. Few more features, and a larger semi-weighted keyboard. (See section 2.4 for differences from XP-50)

JV-2080 64-Voice Synthesizer
Released: Jan 1997
Discontinued: Still a current model.
A bigger and better JV-1080. 8 expansion boards, larger LCD similar to the XP-80 LCD screen. 3 EFX per performance instead of 1 like the JV-1080. (See section 2.5 for differences from the JV-1080)

XP-60 Music Workstation
Released: Feb 1998
Discontinued: Still a current model.
A smaller 61-key version of the XP-80. Replacment for the XP-50

 

2.2.1 What are the JV-30 Techcnical Specifications?
Keyboard: 61-keys, velocity sensitive
Maximum Polyphony: 24 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: 16
Memory Capacity Performances: User 8
Memory Capacity Tones: Preset 128 (+61 variations), User 128, MT-32 128
Memory Capacity Drum Sets: Preset 9, User 9, MT-32 1
Effects: Reverb/Delay, Chorus
Display: 16 characters X 2 lines Backlit LCD
Connectors: Output (L(Mono)/R), Hold Pedal, Headphones,
MIDI IN / OUT / THRU
Dimensions: 978(W) X 279(D) X 84(H) mm
(38 1/2" X 11" X 3 1/2")
Weight: 6.6kg (14 lbs 8 oz)

 

2.2.2 What are the JV-35 Techcnical Specifications?
Keyboard: 61-keys, velocity sensitive
Maximum Polyphony: 28 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: 16
Memory Capacity Performances: 8
Memory Capacity Tones: Preset 226, User 256 (+256 with VE-JV1 installed)
Memory Capacity Drum Sets: Preset 9, User 9
Effects: Reverb/Delay, Chorus
Display: 16 characters X 2 lines Backlit LCD
Connectors: Output (L(Mono)/R), Pedal, Headphones,
MIDI IN / OUT / THRU, Voice Expansion Slot
Dimensions: 1011(W) X 289(D) X 83(H) mm
(39 13/16" X 11 7/16" X 3 5/16")
Weight: 6.2kg (13 lbs 11 oz)

 

2.2.3 What are the JV-50 Technical Specifications?
Keyboard: 61-keys, velocity sensitive
Maximum Polyphony: 28 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: 16
Memory Capacity Performances: 8
Memory Capacity Tones: Preset 226, User 256 (+256 with VE-JV1 installed)
Memory Capacity Drum Sets: Preset 9, User 9
Effects: Reverb/Delay, Chorus
Sequencer Section
Data Format: Play: SMF (Type 0 or 1) Record: SMF type 0
Tempo: 5 to 250
Time Signature (Recording): 4/4
Disk Drive: 3.5" floppy disk (MF-2DD)
Display: 16 characters X 2 lines Backlit LCD
Connectors: Output (L(Mono)/R), Pedal, Headphones,
MIDI IN / OUT1 / OUT2, Voice Expansion Slot
Dimensions: 1011(W) X 289(D) X 92(H) mm
(39 13/16" X 11 7/16" X 3 5/8")
Weight: 6.6kg (14 lbs 9 oz)

 

2.2.4 What are the JV-80 Technical Specifications?
Keyboard: 61-key semi-weighted velocity & aftertouch sensitive
Maximum Polyphony: 28 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: Part 1 - 7 + Rhythm Part
Memory Capacity Patches: Preset 128, Internal 64, Memory Card 64
Memory Capacity Performances: Preset 32, Internal 16, Memory Card 16
Memory Capacity Rhythm Sets: Preset 2, Internal 1, Memory Card 1
Built-in Effects: Chorus, Reverb/Delay
Display: 40 characters X 2 lines backlit LCD
Connectors: Main Output L (Mono)/R, Headphones,
Hold Pedal, Pedal 1/2,
MIDI IN / OUT / THRU,
PCM Card, Data Card, Expansion Slot
Dimensions: 990(W) X 305(D) X 85(H)
(39" X 12" X 3 3/8")
Weight: 9kg (19 lbs 13 oz)

 

2.2.5 What are the JV-880 Technical Specifications?
Maximum Polyphony: 28 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: Part 1 - 7 + Rhythm Part
Memory Capacity Patches: Preset 128, Internal 64, Memory Card 64
Memory Capacity Performances: Preset 32, Internal 16, Memory Card 16
Memory Capacity Rhythm Sets: Preset 2, Internal 1, Memory Card 1
Built-in Effects: Chorus, Reverb/Delay
Display: 24 characters X 2 lines backlit LCD
Connectors: Main Output L (Mono)/R
Sub Output L (Mono)/R
MIDI IN / OUT / THRU
PCM Card, Data Card, Expansion Slot
Dimensions: 482(W) X 358(D) X 45(H)
(19" X 14 1/8" X 1 3/4")
Weight: 4.2kg (9 lbs 4 oz)

 

2.2.6 What are the JV-90 Technical Specifications?
Keyboard: 76-key semi-weighted velocity & aftertouch sensitive
Maximum Polyphony: 28 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: Part 1 - 7 + Rhythm Part
Memory Capacity Patches: Preset 256, User 64, Memory Card 64
Memory Capacity Performances: Preset 64, User 16, Memory Card 16
Memory Capacity Rhythm Sets: Preset 4, User 1, Memory Card 1
Built-in Effects: Chorus, Reverb/Delay
Display: 40 characters X 2 lines backlit LCD
Connectors: Main Output L (Mono)/R, V-Exp Out L (Mono)/R,
Headphones, Hold Pedal, Pedal 1/2,
MIDI In/Out/Thru, V-Exp MIDI In,
PCM Card, Data Card, Expansion Slot,
Voice Expansion Slot
Dimensions: 1200(W) X 305(D) X 85(H)
(47 1/4" X 12" X 3 3/8")
Weight: 9.9kg (21 lbs 13 oz)

 

2.2.7 What are the JV-1000 Technical Specifications?
Keyboard: 76-key, velocity and aftertouch sensitive
Maximum Polyphony: 28 voices
Memory Capacity Patches: Preset 256, User 64, Memory Card 64
Memory Capacity Performances: Preset 64, User 16, Memory Card 16
Memory Capacity Rhythm Sets: Preset 4, User 1, Memory Card 1
Expansion Board: 255 Patches (max.)
PCM Card: 128 patches (max.)
Built-in Effects: Reverb (8 types), Chorus (3 types)
Display: 40 characters X 2 lines backlit LCD
Sequencer Section:
Memory Capacity: RAM: 256 Kbytes, ROM: 512 Kbytes
Data Storage: 3.5" MF2-DD, 720 kbytes per disk
Tracks: 8 Phase tracks (16 MIDI ch. per track) 1 Rhythm Track, 1 Tempo Track
Internal Memory: 8 songs or approx. 40,000 notes
External MFD: 108 songs or approx. 150,000 notes per disk
Max. Length of Song: 9,999 measures or 87,381 quarter notes
Rhythm Track Data: 32 Instruments, 240 Patterns per Song (max.)
Phase Track Resolution: 96 clocks per quarter note
Rhythm Track Resolution: 32 clocks per quarter note
Recording Modes: Realtime, Step
Tempo: 5 - 500 (Tempo Track)
Display: 2-line X 40 character backlit LCD
Connectors: Mix Output (L/Mono, R)
V-Exp Out (L/Mono, R)
Hold Pedal, Pedal (1,2)
MIDI (In, Out, Thru, Seq. Out)
PCM Card, Data Card, Expansion Slot,
Start/Stop, Punch In/Out
Metronome Out, Tape Sync II (In, Out), Headphones
Dimensions: 1,232(W) X 348(D) X 97(H) mm
(48 1/2" X 13 7/10" X 3 4/5")
Weight: 13.5kg (29.8 lbs)

 

2.2.8 What are the JV-1080 Technical Specifications?
Maximum Polyphony: 64 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: 16
Memory Capacity- Patches: Internal 640, User 128, Data Card 64
Memory Capacity- Performance: Internal 64, User 32, Data Card 16
Memory Capacity- Rhythm Sets: Internal 10, User 2, Data Card 1
System Common Effects: Chorus, Reverb (8 types)
Insert Effects: 40 types
Display: 40 Characters X 2 lines (backlit LCD)
Connectors: Mix Out (L/R), Output 1 (L/R), Output 2 (L/R)
Phones, MIDI In/Out/Thru,
PCM Card slot, Data Card Slot, Expansion Slot (4)
Dimensions: 482(W) X 281(D) X 88(H)mm
(18-15/16" X 11-1/6" X 3-1/2")
EIA-2U rack mount type
Weight: 5kg (11 lbs 1 oz)

 

2.2.9 What are the JV-2080 Technical Specifications?
Maximum Polyphony: 64 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: 16
Memory Capacity- Patches: Internal 768, User 128, Data Card 64 (M256E) or 128 (M512E)
Memory Capacity- Performance: Internal 64, User 32, Data Card 16 (M256E) or 32 (M512E)
Memory Capacity- Rhythm Sets: Internal 12, User 2, Data Card 1 (M256e) or 2 (M512E)
System Common Effects: Chorus, Reverb (8 types)
Insert Effects: 40 types
Display: 320 X 80 full dots backlit LCD
Connectors: Mix Out (L/R), Output 1 (L/R), Output 2 (L/R)
Phones, MIDI In/Out/Thru,
Data Card Slot, Expansion Slot (8)
Dimensions: 482 (W) x 281 (D) x 88 (H) mm
19 (W) x 11-1/16 (D) x 3-1/2 (H) inches
EIA-2U rack mount type
Weight: 4.9kg (10 lbs 13 oz)

 

2.2.10 What are the XP-10 Technical Specifications?
Keyboard: 61-keys, with velocity
Maximum Polyphony: 28 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: 16
Memory Capacity Performances: Internal 64, User 64
Memory Capacity Tones: Internal 338, User 256
Memory Capacity Drum Sets: Internal 16, User 20
Effects: Reverb (8 types), Chorus (8 types)
Display: 16 characters X 2 lines LCD
Connectors: Output (L(Mono)/R), Pedal (used as both pedal
switch and expression), Headphones,
MIDI IN / OUT / THRU, Computer IF (Mac/PC-1/PC-2)
Power Supply: AC Adaptor
Dimensions: 1034(W) X 296(D) X 94(H) mm
(41" X 12" X 4")
Weight: 5.0kg (11 lbs 1 oz)
Appeggiator:
Octave Range: -3 ~ +3 oct
Sync Source: Internal, MIDI
Key Velocity: Fixed (1 - 127), REAL
Groove Ratio: 0 - 100%
Shuffle Ratio: 0 - 100%
Tempo: 20 - 250 bpm
Styles: 30
Motifs: 33
Beat Patterns: 52

 

2.2.11 What are the XP-50 Technical Specifications?
Synthesizer Section
Keyboard: 61-key, velocity and aftertouch sensitive
Maximum Polyphony: 64 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: 16
Memory Capacity Performances: Internal 64, User 32
Memory Capacity Patches: Internal 640, User 128
Memory Capacity Rhythm Sets: Internal 10, User 2
System Common Effects: Chorus, Reverb (8 types)
EFX: 40
Sequencer Section
Data Storage: 3.5" Micro Floppy Disk (MFD-2DD/2HD)
Data Format: MRC Pro, Standard MIDI File (Format 0/1)
convert load MRC (for MC-500/300/50/50mkII)
Tracks: 16 Phase Tracks (16 MIDI Channels per Track)
+ 1 Tempo Track, 100 Pattern Tracks
Resolution: 96 clocks per quarter note
Internal Memory: 20,000 notes
External MFD: 99 Songs or 180,000 notes per disk
Max. Length of Song: 999 measures
Others
Display: 40 characters X 2 lines backlit LCD
Connectors: Output (L(Mono)/R), Hold, Pedal 1/2, Phones,
MIDI IN / OUT / THRU,
4 Expansion Slots
Dimensions: 1023(W) X 348(D) X 97(H)
(41" X 14" X 4")
Weight: 9.2kg (20 lbs 5 oz)

 

2.2.12 What are the XP-60 Technical Specifications?
Synthesizer Section
Keyboard: 61-key, semi-weighted synth-action
velocity and aftertouch sensitive
Maximum Polyphony: 64 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: 16
Memory Capacity Performances: Internal 64, User 32
Memory Capacity Patches: Internal 512, User 128
Memory Capacity Rhythm Sets: Internal 8, User 2
System Common Effects: Chorus, Reverb (8 types)
EFX: 40
Sequencer Section
Data Storage: 3.5" Micro Floppy Disk (MFD-2DD/2HD)
Data Format: MRC Pro, Standard MIDI File (Format 0/1)
convert load MRC (for MC-500/300/50/50mkII)
Tracks: 16 Phase Tracks (16 MIDI Channels per Track)
+ 1 Tempo Track, 100 Pattern Tracks
Resolution: 96 clocks per quarter note
Internal Memory: 60,000 notes
External MFD: 99 Songs or 180,000 notes per disk (2HD)
Max. Length of Song: 9998 measures
Others
Display: 320 X 80 full dots backlit LCD
Connectors: MIX Output (stereo), DIRECT output (stereo),
Headphones (stereo), Hold Pedal, Control
Pedals 1,2,3,4, MIDI IN / OUT / THRU,
4 Expansion Slots,
Click (metronome) output
Dimensions: Unknown
(49" X 14" X 4")
Weight: (21 lbs 14 oz)

 

2.2.13 What are the XP-80 Technical Specifications?
Synthesizer Section
Keyboard: 76-key, semi-weighted synth-action
velocity and aftertouch sensitive
Maximum Polyphony: 64 voices
Number of Multitimbral Parts: 16
Memory Capacity Performances: Internal 64, User 32
Memory Capacity Patches: Internal 512, User 128
Memory Capacity Rhythm Sets: Internal 8, User 2
System Common Effects: Chorus, Reverb (8 types)
EFX: 40
Sequencer Section
Data Storage: 3.5" Micro Floppy Disk (MFD-2DD/2HD)
Data Format: MRC Pro, Standard MIDI File (Format 0/1)
convert load MRC (for MC-500/300/50/50mkII)
Tracks: 16 Phase Tracks (16 MIDI Channels per Track)
+ 1 Tempo Track, 100 Pattern Tracks
Resolution: 96 clocks per quarter note
Internal Memory: 60,000 notes
External MFD: 99 Songs or 180,000 notes per disk (2HD)
Max. Length of Song: 9998 measures
Others
Display: 320 X 80 full dots backlit LCD
Connectors: MIX Output (stereo), DIRECT output (stereo),
Headphones (stereo), Hold Pedal, Control
Pedals 1,2,3,4, MIDI IN / OUT / THRU,
4 Expansion Slots,
Click (metronome) output
Dimensions: 1238(W) X 349(D) X 107(H)
(49" X 14" X 4")
Weight: 12.9kg (28 lbs 8 oz)

 

2.3 What are the differences between the JV-1080 and XP-50?
Apart from the obvious fact that the JV-1080 is a 19" rack mount module, and the XP-50 is a keyboard, the differences are as follows:
  • Expansion Slots:
    The JV-1080 has PCM and Data Card expansion slots (See section 3.0 for more information), and the XP-50 does not.

  • Audio Outputs:
    The JV-1080 has 3 stereo outputs, and the XP-50 only has 1 stereo output pair.

  • Sequencer:
    The XP-50 has a built in sequencer which makes the operating systems quite different.

  • Presets:
    The order of the preset patches/performances is different and a few of the patches are different.

 

2.4 What are the differences between the XP-80 and XP-50?
The JV-1080, XP-50 and XP-80 all use the same sound engine, but the XP-80 has some important differences.
  • User interface:
    The user interface was redone in the XP-80 which included a much larger backlit LCD, which can display graphics & menus. Six function keys were also added under the display which are a part of the new interface.

  • Larger Keyboard:
    The XP-80 has an extended 76-note semi-weighted** keyboard and the XP-50 has a 61-note keyboard which is not weighted.

  • Additional Sliders:
    In addition to the 2 programmable sliders on the XP-50, the XP-80 has 4 new sliders, which can be assigned to Cutoff frequency, Resonance, Attack Rate, Decay Rate, or tone level adjustments. These new sliders make real-time patch adjustments much quicker and easier.

  • Additional Outputs:
    The XP-80 has 2 stereo outputs (MIX and DIRECT) and also headphones, where the XP-50 has 1 stereo output and headphones. The XP-80 also has a "Click Out" with its own volume control which outputs the metronome sound. (For drummers etc)

  • Additional Pedal Jacks:
    The XP-80 has 4 assignable pedal jacks, where the XP-50 has 2.

  • Additional Sequencer Memory:
    The XP-80 has a 60,000 note memory, where the XP-50 has 20,000.

  • New Onboard arpeggiator:
    A new arpeggiator with 33 built-in styles including guitar strums.

** This is not the same as a fully weighted keyboard

 

2.5 What are the differences between the JV-2080 and JV-1080?
  • User Interface:
    The JV-2080 has a larger LCD screen and a much easier to use operating system (which is similar to the XP-80). The newer operating system allows such things as graphical editing of envelopes etc.

  • Internal Memory:
    The JV-2080 has an extra bank (128) of internal preset patches (PR-E) and performances (16).

  • Effects:
    The JV-2080 allows up to 3 EFX to be assigned to a performance where the JV-1080 allowed only one.

  • Expansion Boards:
    The JV-2080 can take up to 8 expansion boards where the JV-1080 can only take 4.

  • Patch Finder:
    The JV-2080 has a new 'Innovative Patch Finder function' which allows you to group similar patches into one of 38 categories 'making patch location quick and easy'.

  • PCM Card Slot:
    The JV-1080 has a PCM card slot, and the JV-2080 does not.

 

2.6 How do I find out what my ROM version is?
JV-80:
Turn unit off. Then while holding down the number [1] button on the lower right side, turn the keyboard on again. A screen similar to the following will appear:

MULTI TIMBRAL SYNTHESIZER Roland JV-80
Version 1.00 Oct - 16 - 1991

JV-1080:
Back up your internal programs etc. to card or librarian (Precaution from Roland). Press [SHIFT] + [ENTER] together. Then, while holding down the [UP] and [DOWN] arrows together, press the data knob in. A screen like the following will appear:

JV-1080 TEST MODE CPU 1.01 Ver 1.02
Completed.

To exit the test "properly" press the Tone Select [4] button. If you don't, powering off/on will leave cleared (as USER: ...) all of USER RAM, i.e. both patch and performance memory. Of course, you can reload all of the factory defaults as explained in question 6.1.

-- Thanks: Ben Tubb <brtubb@cybertron.com>

XP-50:
Press [SEQUENCER] button to enter Sequencer mode. Then press [SHIFT] + [ENTER] + [EXIT] simultaneously. A screen like the following should appear:

Roland Music Workstation XP-50
1.03 0078 1.01 95/09/19 13:31 R

The first number on the display (1.03 in the above example) is the ROM version. The second version number (1.01 in the above example) is the CPU version. Press [EXIT] to leave this screen.

XP-80:
Press [SEQUENCER] button to enter Sequencer mode. Then press [SHIFT] + [ENTER] + [EXIT] simultaneously. A screen like the following should appear:

 
1.04 EXT0088 CPU1.01 96/06/13 14:41 XP3
 

The first number on the display (1.04 in the above example) is the ROM version. The second version number preceded by CPU is the CPU version. Press [EXIT] to leave this screen.

 

2.7 What is the current ROM/CPU version for my synth?
JV-80:
Version 1.00: Is the only version that has been reported.

JV-1080:
ROM 1.03, CPU 1.01: are the latest versions reported.

ROM 1.03 It has been reported that the Galaxy editor for the Mac will not work correctly with the JV-1080 unless it has this ROM version or later.

XP-50:
ROM 1.03, CPU 1.01: are the latest versions reported.

CPU 1.01 fixes a problem with a 'POP' noise when the XP-50 is powered on.

XP-80:
ROM 1.10, CPU 1.04 are the latest versions reported.

CPU 1.02 fixes a problem with the PR-C:098 patch. Sometimes when played 'popping' and 'clicking' can be heard. This bug appears to be very specific and only occurs on patches with similar structures and parameters to PR-C:098.
ROM 1.10 fixes a bug when assigning GM patches 041-056 to Performance PR-A:01 Part 1 no sound is heard. When loading and converting a SMF format 1, track 15 may be merged into track 16 and track 15 will be empty. In track info screen, track 16 _may_ show the information for a previously loaded song. When using soft thru and there are multiple note on messages, the XP _may_ only transmit one note off message. While recording the timing may have occasionally drifted.
ROM 1.08 fixes a bug when recording with the Quantitize function ON, very rarely the XP may miss recording.
ROM 1.07 fixes a slave mistep bug, an external sync to clock bug and a chain play bug.
ROM 1.05 correctes a timing problem with the sequencer syncing to patches (drum loops) from the Dance exp. board.
ROM 1.04 apparently fixed some sequencer timing problems when large amounts of MIDI data was being received.

Some users have had problems with the brigthness of the LCD display. Roland have service a upgrade #100920 which upgrades the LCD display.

Please note the upgrades are only available through your local Roland Service Centre. Upgrades should be free. Please only request an upgrade if you are experiencing problems with your synth. There is no need to upgrade just for the sake of it, as it costs Roland time and money and will just push synth prices up.

 

2.8 How can I recalibrate the bender/sliders on the XP-50?
From: jonesj@aur.alcatel.com (Jeff Jones)
Date: Mon, 4 Mar 1996 10:47:21 -0500
Subject: XP-50 Bender Calibration

The pitch bender controller knob is a position transducer which converts the position of the knob to a hexadecimal value. The maximum range is from 000 to 3FF (hex). The value can be viewed by performing the following key presses:

Press [SEQUENCER]
Press and hold [SHIFT] + [ENTER] + [EXIT]
See the ROM version number display.
Press the [DOWN-ARROW]

The display looks something like this:

BENDER  | Now| Low:<--Mid-->:High| Result
THRESHLD|026A|0043:01F9|0278:03C4| 0

The "Now" value indicates the current position of the knob. The "Result" value indicates the translated controller output value (-128 to 0 to +127). The "Now" value will indicate the range of the knob, for example 0013 (hex) when pushed fully left to 03F1 (hex) when pushed fully right.

The "Low" value always defaults to 0043 (hex) and the "High" value always defaults to 03C4 (hex) following power-up. These values are automatically self-calibrated by pushing the knob fully to the left and fully to the right. This self-calibration must be performed every time you power-up, but you don't have to use this menu. In other words, every time you turn on the XP-50, push the Bender knob fully left and right, in any mode, and the "Low" and "High" values will be automatically calibrated. The "Low" value will always decrease and remain at a number that is 14 (hex) greater than the lowest achievable "Now" value. Similarly, the "High" value will increase and remain at a number that is 14 (hex) less than the highest achievable "Now" value.

The two "Mid" values are the ones that you can change to calibrate the center point of the bender knob. These changes are saved while power is off. The first "Mid" value (e.g. 01F9) is the lower threshold. When the "Now" value is just below this "Mid" value, the "Result" will start to become negative. Similarly, the second "Mid" value (e.g. 0278) is the upper threshold. When the "Now" value is just above this "Mid" value, the "Result" will start to become positive. For any "Now" values between the lower and upper "Mid" threshold values (e.g. between 01F9 and 0278), the "Result" will be 0.

By adjusting the lower and upper "Mid" thresholds, you can center the knob, and you can set its sensitivity. Push the knob to the left and release it very slowly. It will stop at the center, and its value may be around 0220. Now, when you push the knob to the right and release it slowly, it will stop at the center, but its value may be around 0260. This means that the "Now" value has 40 (hex) values at which it is resting in the center.

Select a value for the thresholds to be 10 (hex) below/above the center position. In this example, you would set the lower "Mid" threshold to be 0210, and the upper "Mid" threshold to be 0270. You can enter the numbers by moving the cursor to the desired field and using the numeric keys or the INC/DEC buttons or the data wheel.

The display should now look like this:

BENDER  | Now| Low:<--Mid-->:High| Result
THRESHLD|0245|0027:0210|0270:03ED| 0

Try experimenting with "Mid" values which are more than 10 (hex) from the center position. To allow for environmental changes, keep the thresholds at least 10 away from the center position.

You can also modify the "Low" and "High" values, but the changes will not be saved, as described above.

Pressing the [DOWN-ARROW] moves to the Modulation lever Threshold display. This calibration is similar to but simpler than the Bender calibration.

Press [EXIT] to exit the controller display menu.

 

2.9 How can I recalibrate the bender/sliders on the XP-80?
Date: Wed, 04 Feb 1998 13:56:17 -0800 From: Nathan Sheldon Subject: [jv1080] RE: unwanted pitch bend data (XP-80)

If you, or anyone with an XP-80, are having trouble with your mod/pitch bend lever not being calibrated correctly, you can calibrate it yourself through the XP-80's test/diagnostic screens. To assess them, here's what you do:

1) While the keyboard is off, hold down the [EFX], [UTILITY], and [RHYTHM] keys and turn on the keyboard. You'll see a little message like "Now checking devices....."

2) Press the F6 (NEXT) button 4 times to get to the "[4] Bender & Modulation Lever Adjustment" screen.

3) You'll see something like:

Now   BEND-L   BEND-R   Out | Now   MOD   Out
----------------------------+----------------
20D    [195]    [247]     0 | 063  [093]    0

If the "Out" is anything other than 0, you need to calibrate the lever.

4) To calibrate the modulation part of the lever, move it foreward and backwards a few times, letting it rest normally, then press the [F5] (MOD) button to reset the "Out" value to 0 at the odulation lever setting (under the MOD heading, in hexadecimle value). All future values of the modulation lever (under the "Now" heading, also in hex numbers) below the MOD value will be ignored.

5) To calibrate the pitch bend lever, move the lever to the extreme left and bring it back to its resting position, just like you would if you were using it to bend the pitch of a sound. Now press the [F2] (BEND-L) key. Continuing, move the lever to its extreme right and back to the center position, just as you would to bend the pitch of a sound. Now press the [F3] (BEND-R) key. From now on, any (hexadecimal) values between the BEND-L and BEND-R values will be ignored, only values below BEND-L and above BEND-R will be used to send Pitch Bend data.

6) Press the [F1] (Prev) 4 times to go back to the "XP-80TEST" screen. Press [F1] (Exit) again to exit the test mode. Press [F6] (Sure) to confirm the test exit. Finally press [F1] (No) to leave USER memory untouched, or [F6] (Yes) to recall factory presets and erase USER memory. You are now back at the normal screen you see when you turn on the XP-80.

 

 
Section 3 - EXPANDING THE SYNTHS
 
 
3.1 How can I add more waveforms/patches to my synth?
Expansion Boards:
SR-JV80 Expansion board If your synth is in the 6A family or 46 family, you can install an 8MB Expansion Board which gives you more waveforms, patches, performances and rhythm sets. (see section 3.2).

PCM Card:
If your synth has a PCM Card slot (JV-80, JV-880, JV-90, JV-1000, JV-1080), you can add 2MB PCM Card which gives you more waveforms and patches. (see section 3.3).

Data Card:
If your synth has a Data Card slot (JV-80, JV-880, JV-90, JV-1000, JV-1080, JV-2080) you can add a Data Card which gives you more patches and performances. (see section 3.4).

VE-GS1 and VE-JV1:
If you have a JV-35, JV-50 or JV-90 you can install a VE-GS1 or VE-JV1 expansion board. The VE-GS1 adds 226 GS sounds and another 28 voices of polyphony and another 16-parts multitimbrality. (It is a bit like having a SoundCanvas on a board) The VE-JV1 adds 512 sounds (from the JV-1000 and JV-80), another 28 voices and 8 parts multitimbrality. (This board is for the JV-35 and JV-50 and is basically a JV-80 on a board.)

Patch Banks:
You can add more patches to your synth by obtaining patches (or patch banks.) These are basically more patches which use the waveforms already in your synth.

There are some companies which sell patch banks for the JV/XP synths. Some people also out patches up on the internet for free download. You can search for both commercial and free patches at: http://www.frisbee.net.au/jv/links/.

There is no other way of adding waveforms to the synths, not even using the floppy disk drive on the XP-50, XP-80. It is a common question if it is possible to import .WAV files into these synths. It cannot be done. The PCM cards are not the same as PC PCM-CIA cards. Also Roland use their own compression techniques on their cards which are not public knowledge. The JV/XP range are synthesizers and not samplers.

Note that some of the JV/XP sounds are available on CD-ROM for the Roland S770/S760 samplers if you happened to own one of those beasties.

 

3.2 What Expansion boards are available?
There are 19 expansion boards in existence, with 15 currently available commercially. (The Dance, Experience and Experience 2 boards are not easily obtainable.)

The Expansion boards should not be confused with the credit-card-sized PCM Cards or Data Cards. The Expansion boards are a small circuit board with a connector and several microchips onboard. Each expansion board contains 8MB of memory which Roland claims is equivalent to 16MB in 16-bit linear format.

SR-JV80 Expansion board SR-JV80 Expansion board

The JV-2080 can hold from 1 to 8 of these boards. The XP-50, XP-60, XP-80, and JV-1080 can hold from 1 to 4 of these boards. The XP-30 can hold 1 or two of these boards. The JV-80, JV-880, JV-90, JV-1000, JV-1010 & JD-990 can hold only one of these boards at one time. None of the GS Family synths can use these boards.

The list of expansion boards are as follows:

Pop (SR-JV80-01)
This board contains 224 Waveforms and 145 Patches. Contains basic pop instruments such as; electric guitars, drums, percussion, keyboards, bass, strings, brass.

More information and demo sounds on the Pop board.

Orchestral (SR-JV80-02)
This board contains 174 Waveforms and 255 Patches. Contains many orchestral sounds covering; strings, woodwind, brass, percussion, classical piano.

More information and demo sounds on the Orchestral board.

Piano (SR-JV80-03)
This board contains 73 Waveforms and 111 Patches. Contains mostly Piano, Electric Piano, Rhodes sounds.

More information and demo sounds on the Piano board.

Vintage Synth (SR-JV80-04)
This board contains 255 Waveforms and 255 Patches.

More information and demo sounds on the Vintage Synth board.

World (SR-JV80-05)
This board contains 255 Waveforms and 255 Patches. Sounds from different regions of the world such as; Asia, Europe, Australia, Middle East, Africa, South America. Some nice looped rhythm patterns.

More information and demo sounds on the World board.

Dance (SR-JV80-06)
This board contains 255 Waveforms and 255 Patches. Mostly dance orientated sounds with some excellent rhythm patterns. Note that Roland have discontinued the production of this board due to legal problems.

More information on the Dance board.

Super Sound Set (SR-JV80-07)
This board contains 255 Waveforms and 255 Patches. All the sounds on this board come from the collection of Roland PCM cards. (Except for SO-PCM1-04 Grand Piano) Contains various sounds like, piano, guitar, brass, drums, Baroque style, harpsichord, pipe organ, fiddle, banjo, etc. Roland released this board as the newer synths no longer have PCM card slots and the PCM card series has been discontinued.

More information and demo sounds on the Super Sound Set board.

Keyboards of the 60's & 70's (SR-JV80-08)
This board contains 255 Waveforms and 255 Patches. I think the name of the board is pretty self-explanatory here :-)

More information and demo sounds on the Keyboards of the 60's & 70's board.

Session (SR-JV80-09)
This board contains 206 Waveforms and 254 Patches. The main features of this board are the Stereo Piano samples, brass, strings, vintage keyboard, and other pop orientated waveforms.

More information and demo sounds on the Session board.

Bass & Drums (SR-JV80-10)
This expansion board contains 241 Waveforms and 204 Patches, which consists of bass and drum sounds created by five well-known musicians. Bass: Marcus Miller, Abraham Laroriel, John Patitucci. Drums: Abe Laboriel Jr., Bob Wilson

More information and demo sounds on the Bass & Drums board.

Techno (SR-JV80-11)
This board contains 255 Waveforms and 255 patches. This expansion board comes loaded with a complete range of waveforms, patches, and rhythm sets that fit perfectly with the latest techno/dance music (Techno, Jungle, Drum'n'Bass, Ambient, Acid-House, Trip-Hop, Detroit, Trance, Gabba, Industrial, etc.) -- including phrase loops, synth bass, and other synth sounds, and various hit sounds.

More information and demo sounds on the Techno board.

Hip-Hop Collection (SR-JV80-12)
This board contains ??? Waveforms and 256 patches. This expansion board has a collection of hip-hop sounds, including lo-fi sounds for emerging forms of hip-hop like "acid jazz" and "trip hop". Over half of the collection is dedicated to phrase loops, giving over 40 ready-to-use patterns.

More information and demo sounds on the Hip Hop board.

Vocal Collection (SR-JV80-13)
This board contains 82 Waveforms and 131 patches for 6A family or 128 patches for 46 family. This expansion board contains expressive jazz scat, high-quality chior, and vocal phrases. Five types each of stereo jazz scat voices are available. Available chior sounds include some stereo large chior, gregorian chior, sporano chior, boys chior and a full selection of other chiors and vocal phrases.

More information and demo sounds on the Vocal board.

World Collection: Asia (SR-JV80-14)
This board contains 175 Waveforms and 256 patches. This expansion board offers precious Asian instrument sounds mainly from India, China and Indonesia. It features Asian distinctive string instruments that sing like weeping as well as many lively rhythmic instruments that can be used in many music genre.

More information and demo sounds on the World Collection: Asia board.

Special FX Collection (SR-JV80-15)
This board over 100 waveforms and 256 patches. ``The SR-JV80-15 Special FX Collection offers a huge array of unique sounds, many derived from the popular Spectrasonics' Distorted Reality CD-ROM. Included are synth-type effects, ambient sounds, noise and rhythmic hits, environmental and nature sounds, and more. Especially remarkable is the broad collection of machines, city and construction noises, rivers, oceans, birds, insects and other natural audio bytes-perfect for spicing up soundtracks, as well as ambitious dance music applications.''

More information on the Special FX Collection expansion board.

Orchestral 2 (SR-JV80-16)
This board over 140 waveforms and 200 patches. ``The SR-JV80-16 Orchestral II Collection is well suited for pop-oriented orchestral music, film, television and jingle composers with its stunning new orchestral and Celtic Patches. Orchestral samples range from stereo strings, brass, wind instruments and percussion to ancillary sounds such as breath noise. Celtic instruments-increasingly found in contemporary film and television scores-include bosouki, uillean pipe, bodhran and clarsah harp.''

Country Collection (SR-JV80-17)
``The SR-JV80-17 Country Collection wave expansion board gives expandable XP and JV-Series synthesizer owners easy access to hundreds of superb country music sounds. These instrument sounds include everything from high-quality acoustic guitars to pedal steel, resonator guitar (metal hollow-body), clean electric guitars, fiddle, banjo, wash-tub bass, a wide variety of natural drum sounds and much more. The SR-JV80-17 is evidence of Roland's strong commitment to regularly new wave expansion boards focused on specific sound categories and music styles.''

This board was announced at the Summer NAMM (July 1999) and is not exepected to be commercially available for a few months.

Experience 2 (SR-JV80-98)
This board contains 27 Waveforms and 100 Patches. It was not for retail sale and packaged as a promotion with some new JV/XP synths. The board is a sampler containing selected sounds from nine of the expansion boards (Pop, Orchestral, Piano, Vintage Synth, World, Super Sound Set, Keyboards of the 60's & 70's, Session, Bass & Drums).

More information on the Experience 2 board.

Experience (SR-JV80-99)
This board contains 19 Waveforms and 64 Patches. It was not for retail sale. It was a promotion by Roland and was packaged with some new JV-90's and XP-50's as a sampler. The board contains selected sounds from five expansion boards which were available at the time (Pop, Orchestral, Piano, Vintage Synth & World).

More information on the Experience board.

All of these boards are from Roland. There are currently no third party boards available and I doubt if there will ever be as they are so integrated with the internals of the synth.

 

3.3 What PCM cards are available?
  • SO-PCM1-01 Piano Selection
  • SO-PCM1-02 Guitar & Brass
  • SO-PCM1-03 Rock Drums
  • SO-PCM1-04 Grand Piano
  • SO-PCM1-05 Accordion
  • SO-PCM1-06 Baroque
  • SO-PCM1-07 Orchestral FX
  • SO-PCM1-08 Country/Folk/Bluegrass

During 1996 Roland discontinued the PCM card series. Newer Roland synths (like the JV-2080, XP-50, XP-60 & XP-80) do not have the PCM card slot on them any more.

If you hunt around some music dealers you may be able to find old stocks of PCM cards. Roland did release the SR-JV80-07 Super Sound Set expansion board which contains MOST (not all) of the waveforms/patches found in the PCM card series.

 

3.4 What data cards are available?
The Roland Data Cards are credit card sized and slot into the back of most of the JV range synths, and in the front of the modules. They contain patches and performances, but do not contain any new waveforms. Most cards contain 64 patches and 16 performances.

There are two memory cards: M-256E and M-512E. These allow your to store your own patches/performances on the card.

Below is a list of Data Cards in the Roland Sound Library for the JV-80, JV-880, JV-90, JV-1000 & JV-1080:

  • Rich Sound Collection 1 (PN-JV80-01) for use with POP expansion board.
  • Multi Timbral Sounds 1 (PN-JV80-02) for use with POP expansion board.
  • Multi Timbral Sounds 2 (PN-JV80-03) for use with POP expansion board.
  • Rich Sound Collection 2 (PN-JV80-04) uses internal waveforms.
  • Contemorary Composer (PN-JV80-05) uses internal waveforms.
  • Rich Sound Collection 3 (PN-JV80-06) for use with ORCHESTRAL expansion board.
  • Rich Sound Collection 4 (PN-JV80-07) from JV-1000 preset patches.
  • Memory Card (M-256E) 32K programmable memory data card, which can store 64 Patches, 16 Performances and 1 Rhythm kit.
  • Memory Card (M-512E) 64K programmable memory data card, which can store 128Patches, 32 Performances and 2 Rhythm kits.

There are third party cards available, but I have no details on these at this stage.

 

 
Section 4 - SYNTH TERMINOLOGY AND SYSEX
 
 
4.1 What's the difference between a waveform, tone, patch, performance, bank etc?
I have broken these definitions into two sections for GS Family synths and 46 & 6A Family synths, due to their differences.

GS Family synths: (JV-30, JV-35, JV-50 & XP-10)
Waveform:
A waveform is a raw sound stored in the synth or expansion board. Sometimes referred to as a sample.
Tone:
A tone is the smallest unit of sound. Each tone consists of one waveform and other settings such as envelope, pitch, filters, LFO, etc.
Patch:
Patches do not really exist in the GS Family but for compatibility a patch is the same as a tone.
Performance:
A performance is a group of 16 tones. In performance mode each tone is usually assigned to a different MIDI channel and the synth is in multitimbral mode.

46 & 6A Family synths: (JV-80, JV-880, JV-90, JV-1000, JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-50, XP-60, XP-80)
Waveform:
A waveform is a raw sound stored in the synth or expansion board. Sometimes referred to as a sample.
Tone:
A tone is the smallest unit of sound. Each tone consists of one waveform and other settings such as envelope, pitch, filters, LFO, etc. A patch is made up of 4 tones.
Patch:
A patch us a unit of sound you play in patch mode or performance mode. One patch consists of 4 tones, but it does not need to use all 4. You can assign settings such as MIDI channel, Effects, Velocity etc to a Patch.
Performance:
A performance is a group of 15 patches (only 7 for 46 Family) plus a rhythm set. In performance mode you can assign each part to a different MIDI channel or layer them. This is also known as multitimbral mode. You can assign Effects to a performance (which overrides the effects for the individual patches).

 

4.2 What is User, Preset, Internal and Temporary memory?
There are three types of memory in JV/XP synths. Preset, User and Temporary memory.

Preset memory:
is in ROM and cannot be changed. Preset patches, performances and rhythm kits are stored into the synth's memory in the factory. These patches, performances and rhythm kits can never be lost.

Presets can be identified by their prefix. On 6A Family synths they are prefixed with PR-A, PR-B, PR-C, GM, (and PR-E on JV-2080), XP-A, XP-B, XP-C, XP-D (and XP-E, XP-F, XP-G, XP-H on JV-2080). On 46 Family synths they are prefixed with A, B or D.

User memory:
is in RAM and can be changed. The User memory on the 46 Family synths is refered to as Internal memory. Roland changed this to User memory in their later synths. To prevent confusion this FAQ only refers to User memory.

The User patches, performances and rhythm kits on 6A Family synths are prefixed with USER. On the 46 Family they are prefixed with I (internal).

The User memory is where you can store your own settings, or you can load in patch banks. The synths come from the factory with some example patches, performances and rhythm kits in the User area. This is also known as factory settings. See (section 6.1) on how to restore the factory settings.

Temporary memory:
is the current patch, performance or rhythm set you have selected.. Eg. If you go to patch mode and select ANY patch (user or preset), and make some changes, the changes you are making are in temporary memory on the current patch. It stays in temporary memory until you change to another patch. If you wanted to save the new patch you have edited, you could save it in one of the user locations, or onto a data card if your synth has a data card slot.

Temporary memory is very useful for storing patch and performance data in MIDI files. For example: If I wrote a MIDI file song for the XP-50, which used a performance which I created and saved in my USER bank, I could store this performance as a temporary performance in SysEx messages at the start of my MIDI file. So when another person plays my song, all the changes I made to the performance will get loaded into their temporary memory so they can playback my song correctly, and I dont need to write over any of their USER memory.

 

4.3 What is SYSEX?
SysEx is an abbreviation for System Exclusive MIDI messages. These are MIDI messages that are addressed for a particular synth, so you can send these messages and only the correct synth will respond to them. Files which contain only SysEx messages usually have a .SYX file extension.

The two main uses for SysEx are 1) Make changes to a synth while a song is playing. 2) Send &/or Receive Patches, Performances, Rhythm kits, etc to and from a synth. SysEx also allows you to access most of the functions of the synth that you can access from the keyboard and buttons via MIDI messages.

Here is an excerpt from a message posted to the JV/XP Mailing list on January 15th, 1999 from Steve Wahl (steve@dgii.com):
MIDI is a standard way that two electonic musical devices can "talk" to each other about notes and controllers (pedals, pitch bend, etc). But, there is no way that a protocol standard can hope to define messages that control the features that make one synth different from another, especially for features that didn't exist when they wrote the standard.

System exclusive messages (sysex) are a way out of this. The specification tells what the begining of the sys-ex message looks like (including a manufacturer ID that indicates what brand of synth this message is for, so that all other synths on the MIDI connection can ignore it safely), and what the end of the message looks like (so the other synths know when to stop ignoring the message). The manufacturer is then free to put whatever they want between the begining and the end of the sysex message. [ Within the manufacturer specific part of the message, as far as I know all manufacturers have also put in information to identify what model or familiy of synth this message was designed for, so for instance a D-50 can safely ignore a message that's being sent to a JV-1080 instead of being confused by it. The JV/XP synths that this list caters to are all in the same "family" and respond to the same sys-ex messages. The JV/XP's (and others too) also have a way to indicate which of two or more synths of the same family on one midi cable is intended to receive this particular sysex message. ]

In other words, sys-ex messages are used to control aspects of your synthesizer that aren't in the standard MIDI specifications.

Roland has provided a very complete sys-ex implementation in this family of synths, so that all aspects of your synth that can be changed through the front panel can also be changed over the midi connection, such as from a sequencer. (Or nearly all, anyway -- I'm not immediately aware of any exceptions.) As a matter of fact, the sys-ex implementation is so complete, that the sys-ex documentation in the back of the manual is a terse but very accurate window into how the synths operate. When you learn how to read it, it can help make up for some of the confusing parts in the rest of the manual.

If you still dont have any idea what SysEx is or how it differs from ordinary MIDI messages then it may be worth reading some MIDI introduction documentation at http://www.eeb.ele.tue.nl/midi/.

A Typical SysEx message to change a 6A Family synth into Performance mode looks like this:

F0 41 10 6A 12 00 00 00 00 00 00 F7

All SysEx messages for all synths start with F0 and end with F7. For more information on SysEx messages see section 4.4 .

 

4.4 How do I create a SYSEX message for a JV/XP synth?
This question is really aimed at those who really want to understand the ones and zeros of how Roland SysEx messages work. If you are not interested in the details, you just want to use SysEx then most of the Patch editors and Librarians in question 5.4 do most of the work for you.

But say in the middle of a MIDI song you have written for a JV-1080, you would like to insert a MIDI message to change the reverb of the current performance to DELAY.

If you want to create SysEx messages, it is good idea to read the parameter address maps in the back of your manual. These are detailed memory address maps of your synth. JV-80 manual 202-207. JV-1080 manual pages 150-155. XP-50 manual pages 142-147. XP-80 manual pages 221-226.

To do this you would send the following SysEx message:

F0 41 10 6A 12 01 00 00 28 06 51 F7

Here is a breakdown of what the above message means:
F0 Start of SysEx All Sysex Messages start with this
41 Manufacturer ID All Roland synths have ID 41
10 Device ID This is the number you have your synth set to. 10h = id 17, 11h = id 18, etc. The default for synths out of the factory is 10h (17)
6A Model ID This is the model number of the synth.
46 = JV-80/880
6A = JV-1080/2080, XP-50/80
12 Command ID This is the sysex command type.
12 = Data Set.
11 = Data Request.
01 00 00 28 Memory Address This is the part of memory you are writing information into. In this case 01 00 00 28 is the address of the reverb type for the temporary performance.
06 data.. This is the actual data part of the SysEx message. Depending on what the message is, this could be anywhere between one and 256 bytes. In this case 06 is the number for Delay reverb. (See the memory map table in the back of your JV/XP manual)
51 Checksum The checksum used by the synth to ensure that the message has been received correctly before it executes it. If a checksum is wrong then the SysEx command is ignored. See question 4.6 on how to calculate the checksum.
F7 End of SysEx This byte tells the synth that it is the end of the current SysEx message

Another example. The following SysEx message turns Tone 4 on the temporary patch off on a JV-80:

F0 41 10 46 12 00 08 2B 03 00 4A F7
^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^ ^^
|  |  |  |  |       |      |  |  |
|  |  |  |  |       |      |  |  |
|  |  |  |  |       |      |  |  +- End of Sysex message marker
|  |  |  |  |       |      |  +- Checksum
|  |  |  |  |       |      +- Actual data of message
|  |  |  |  |       +- Maddress (00 08 2B 03 = temp patch: tone 4: reverb)
|  |  |  |  +- Command ID (12 = Data Set)
|  |  |  +- Model ID (46 = JV80/880)
|  |  +- Device ID (10 = device 17 which is default for most synths)
|  +- Manufacturer ID (41 = Roland)
+- SysEx header

To create a SysEx message on an XP-50, press [SEQUENCER] then [MICROSCOPE]. Press [EDIT] so the Edit light is lit, then press [1/9] button.. Turn the alpha dial until "CREATE EXCLUSIVE (DEFAULT)" is displayed. Press [ENTER]. A default SysEx message should have been created at the current location on the current track. Press [->] then edit the message as requied.

 

4.5 How can I send a SYSEX file to my synth?
There are various shareware and commercial programs that can send a midi Sysex (.SYX) file out to a MIDI device connected to your computer. These are available for PC, Windows, Mac & Atari. Or you could use a conversion program (mentioned below) to convert the .SYX file into a .MID file and then play it on a sequencer.

Windows 3.1:
dumpster.zip is a SYSEX dump utility for MS Windows 3.1. It is available from: http://www.cs.ruu.nl/pub/MIDI/PROGRAMS/MSWINDOWS/

For the Mac:
OMS SysEx Sender by Andrew Choi. Runs on MacOS 7.1 or above. Requires OMS 2.0.0 or above (available from Opcode Systems: http://www.opcode.com/).
http://mirror.apple.com/Mirrors/Info-Mac.Archive/_Graphic_%26_Sound_Tool/_MIDI/
oms-sysex-sender-11-ppc.hqx - PPC version
oms-sysex-sender-11-68k.hqx - 68K version

An alternative download location:
http://ftp.sunet.se/pub/mac/info-mac/_Graphic_&_Sound_Tool/_MIDI/
oms-sysex-sender-11-ppc.hqx - PPC version
oms-sysex-sender-11-68k.hqx - 68K version

"SysEx" is another sysex sending/receiving package for the Mac written by Steve Grace. More information can be found at: http://www.ioc.net/~sgrace/sysex/

There is also "Bulk Sysex Utility" which is a bulk system exclusive dumping utility for the Mac. It is available at: ftp://ftp.cs.ruu.nl/pub/MIDI/PROGRAMS/MAC/bulksysexutil1.0.cpt.hqx. This is known NOT to work with Mac system 8, certian Power Macs running system 7.0 or higher (try restarting with extensions off), and it is known not to work with Opcode Studio 4 or 5 Midi interfaces.

Atari:
I do not know the names of any SysEx dumping programs for the Atari. If you know of a shareware/freeware package, please Email me with where it can be downloaded so it can be added into the FAQ.

Converting .SYX to .MID (for MS-Dos and Unix):
If your synth is not MIDI connected to your computer then getting .SYX files into your synth can be a pain. Geir Kilstis has written a .SYX to .MID file converter for MS-DOS and Unix which takes a SysEx file and converts it into a midi file, which means you can play the resulting .MID file on the XP-50/XP-60/XP-80 sequencer or any sequencer for that matter. SYSX2MID is available from: http://home.sol.no/~gkilsti/sjv_sw.html

 

4.6 How do I calculate SYSEX checksums properly?
Calculating checksums for SysEx messages is not quite as hard as some people may have you believe. To do the calculations you will need a calculator (or software) that can do Hexidecimal calculations and a modulus (or remainder) function. The calculator that comes with MS Windows can do all this.

Add all the bytes in the message after the command ID which gives you (X). Then divide (X) by 128 and store the remainder (modulus or MOD() for the programmers reading this) in (Y). Then subtract (Y) from 128 which gives you the checksum. This is further explained on pages 148-149 of the XP-50 manual. Page 150 of the JV-1080 manual. Pages 227-228 of the XP-50 manual.

For example the following SysEx message turns off Tone 1 on the temporary patch on a JV-1080/JV-2080/XP-50 or XP-80. The checksum 6D is calculated as follows (all numbers are in Hex NOT decimal):

F0 41 10 6A 12 03 00 10 00 00 6D F7
            ^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^
            |        |        |  |
            |        |        |  +-- End of SysEx message marker
            |        |        +-- Checksum
            |        +-- Data portion of message
            +-- Command ID (12 = DT1 - Data Set)

(1) Add the data part of the message
03 + 00 + 10 + 00 + 00 = 13 (X)

(2) Divide (X) by 0x80 (128 in decimal) and save the reminder which is (Y)
13 / 80 = 0 with remainder of 13 =(Y)

(3) Subtract (Y) from 0x80 (128) to give us the checksum
80 - 13 = 6D (checksum)

 

 
Section 5 - MAKING MUSIC
 
 
5.1 Can I assign different effects to each part in a Performance?
This question is only really relevant for the 46 & 6A family synths. For GS family synths, it is a part of the GS specification to only have one chorus and reverb for all parts. Each part can have different levels though.

This would have to be the most asked question on the JV-1080 list. The short answer is no, you cant. The 46 & 6A family synths do not have enough effects chips.

For 46 family synths, this means while in Performance mode, you can have one Reverb and one Chorus at any one time. However you can change reverb and chourus levels for each part of course.

FOr 6A family synths, you have the above and in addition one EFX aswell. On the JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-50 and XP-80, this one performance EFX can be copied from one of the Patches if needed, to save you from reprogramming the Effects in the Performance mode if you just wanted to duplicate a particular patch's EFX.

Some people complain about this and say it is a big shortcoming. Well I can see that it can be useful, but to do this correctly Roland would need to install 16 EFX chips in a JV-1080, etc, and therefore the price of the unit would be very expensive. You get what you pay for I guess.

If you own a JV-2080 however, it has 3 EFX chips, so in a Performance you can have a Reverb, Chorus and 3 EFX at one time.

There is a good tutorial on the Lil Chips site which explains how to simulate some of the EFX using some of the built-in synthesis features.

 

5.2 Why does a Patch sound different in Performance Mode?
(This question is really geared towards the 6A family synths. For 46 family synths you should be able to make some sense out of this, but note that 46 family synths do not have an EFX chip.)

The main reason patches sound different in performance mode, is because of effects. Each patch in Patch Mode has EFX, Reverb and Chorus, however in Performance Mode there is only one EFX, Reverb and Chorus for the entire performance. (JV-2080 can have 3 EFX)

If you have one particular patch that you are using in a performance and you want it to sound the same as it does in Patch Mode, then follow the instructions below.

Instructions for the XP-50, quoting from the Roland Users Group Magazine (V14N1), page 71:
How do I duplicate the Effects settings of a Patch when I use it in Performance Mode?
Follow the steps listed below to duplicate the settings.

  1. Choose a Performance and assign your Patch to a Part.
  2. Press [DISK/UTILITY].
  3. Cursor to SOUND and press [ENTER].
  4. Cursor to COPY and press [ENTER].
  5. Cursor down to PERFORM FX COPY.
  6. Set the SOURCE to PATCH.
  7. Cursor to NUMBER and dial your Patch Bank and Number.
  8. Press [ENTER], then [PERFORM].
  9. Press [EDIT] (light on), then [EFFECTS] (2/10 under the display). If [PALETTE] is lit, turn it off.
  10. Cursor up to PART OUTPUT ASSIGN and set your Part to PATCH. (If you must change Parts, turn the EDIT light off and use the Part buttons under the display.)
  11. Set the REVERB and CHORUS levels to 127.
  12. Cursor down to EFX TYPE and set the SOURCE to PERFORM.

Quoting a post from Benjamin Tubb on the JV/XP mailing list:
[18 April 1998]

Also set the Part Level to 127 to get the "full" original volume level of the Patch.

A second appoach is to Set the OUTPUT ASSIGN, REVERB and CHORUS Levels to 127, the OUTPUT ASSIGN to PATCH and the PERFORM Source to the given Part.

However, there is a significant difference between the two appoaches. When PERFORM EFX COPY is used, the EFX and REVERB and CHORUS parameters are all copied from the Patch. However in setting the PERFORM Source to a Part, the REVERB and CHORUS parameters of the assigned Part's Patch are not copied (in other words only the Patch EFX parameters are used from the Part's assigned Patch when the PERFORM Source is set to a given Part). And again the Performance PART Level control needs to be set to 127.

For a "simplified" song template approach set the Performance Source to a given Part and then have its PART OUTPUT ASSIGN set to PAT, thus enabling any Patch assigned to that Part to use its Patch's EFX parameters automatically and at their used Tones level settings. Such Patch to Performance Mode "sound" emulation will be almost complete except for the Performance REVERB and CHORUS parameter settings. The next "template" suggestions is to store sysex banks of favorite EFX, REVERB and CHORUS parameters as available utility bank libraries for convenient access.
 

5.3 What is the best piano sound I can get?
Because this is a very frequently asked question in the JV-1080 mailing list, this question is only really relevant to the 6A family synths.

There are two schools of thought on the subject. One is if you want to get a piano sound that is super fantastic and undetectable from the real thing, then buy a piano. (I like this one.) The other is to try and obtain the best waveform available and 'tweak' the patch.

As far as the expansion boards go, the Session expansion board seems to be the favourite as far as Piano sounds go. The first patch has a grand piano which was been sampled across most of the keyboard. The Piano expansion board has had some bad feedback. Keep in mind this board was available before the JV-1080, XP-50 and XP-80 were produced. It certainly provides better pianos than the presets that come with the 46 family synths. The Pop expansion board also has a few piano sounds but the Session board is much better. But as always go to a store and _listen_ to the boards. Your opinion may be different to other peoples.

For the 6A family, I myself use PR-A:012 Piano Strings and turn off tone 2 (strings) this leaves you with a piano patch which I find pleasing.

Nicola Larosa posted the following to the JV-1080 mailing list on 1996-08-26:

From: Nicola Larosa
Subject: The ultimate piano patch!

Well, here it is. The ULTIMATE :-) JV/XP grand piano patch (short of the Session board). You find it attached as an uuencoded MID file containing a sysex dump of the Patch Temp area (so it won't corrupt your precious User slots :-) ). The Device ID is 17 (default). Remember to enable Sysex Receiving.

USAGE INSTRUCTIONS

You have the Pop board? You're all set.
You have the Piano board? Set the waves of Tone 1, 2, 3 to the slot of the Piano board. The wave numbers are the same, i.e. 3, 4, 2.

You have no board? With slightly less quality, you can have a decent piano sound, too! Set the waves of the first three tones to Internal-A, and the numbers to 6, 7, 5 (current plus 3).

You have the Session board? What are you doing in here? :-)

The sound seems too "classic" to you? Raise your SYS-CTRL1 to how much you like. There should be an enough biting piano in there for you too!

The sound "bites" too much when you spank the keys? Turn off Tone 2.

You need a 1 tone piano for your dense orchestrations? Turn off Tone 2 and 3, set to zero the pan position and pan keyfollow of Tone 1, set its wave to 4, and maybe raise a bit its reverb send.

You want a sweet strings sound underneath the piano? Turn on Tone 4. The strings level is controlled by SYS-CTRL2.

The file "piangrnd.mid" containing the patch mentioned in the above mail is available from: http://www.frisbee.net.au/jv/patches/jv1080/piangrnd.mid

 

5.4 What patch editors/librarians are available?
Firstly let me get a common question out of the way. Unfortunatley there is not any shareware patch editors for the Mac available at this time.

For the 6A family:
Name Platform Type Description
ChangeIt! Win95/98/NT Freeware by Jürgen Moßgraber
ChangeIt! is a patch editor and librarian for JV-1080, 2080, XP-50, 60, 80 and can be found at: http://aragon.iitb.fhg.de/moss/changeit.html
Galaxy Plus Mac Commercial by Opcode
Galaxy Plus is a patch editor and librarian for JV-30, 80, 880, 90, 1000, 1080, 2080, XP-10, 50, 80 and can be found at: http://www.opcode.com/
JVEditW99 Win95/98 Shareware by Nils Andriessen
JVEditW99 is a patch editor and librarian for JV-1010, JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-30, XP-50, XP-60, XP-80 and can be found at: http://utopia.knoware.nl/users/dreamstd/index.htm
Merlin Win 3.1
Win95/98
Freeware by Juan Carlos Macho
Merlin patch editor and librarian for JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-30, XP-50, XP-60, XP-80 and can be found at: http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Vista/2872/archive/merlin.zip
NoiZe Win 3.1
Win95/98/NT
Commercial by Terzoid Software
Noize is a patch editor and librarian for JV-80, JV-880, JV-90, JV-1000, JV-1080, XP-50, XP-60, XP-80 and can be found at: http://www.terzoid.com/ A demo version is available for download.
OSC-1 Win95/98/NT Freeware by Norsez Orankij-Anant
OSC-1 is an analog style patch editor for JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-30, XP-60, XP-80 and can be found at: http://www.geocities.com/Vienna/Strasse/3731/mysoftwares.html
SoundDiver Mac
Win95
Commercial by Emagic
SoundDiver is a patch editor and librarian for JV-80, JV-880, JV-90, JV-1000, JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-50, XP-60, XP-80 and can be found at: http://www.emagic.de/
Super JV Win 3.1
Win95/98/NT
Shareware by Softvision
Super JV is a librarian and patch editor for JV-1080, 2080, XP-50, XP-60, XP-80 and can be found at: http://www.softvision.it/superjv.htm
Unisyn Mac
Win95/98/NT
Commercial by Mark Of The Unicorn
Unisyn is a librarian and patch editor for JV-35, 80, 880, 90, 1000, 1080, 2080, XP-10, 50, 80 and can be found at: http://www.motu.com/
WinJV
WinXP
Win 3.1
Win 95/98/NT
Freeware by Marco Stella
WinJV and WinXP are a patch librarians and editors for the JV-1080, 2080, XP-50, 60, 80. They can be found at: http://www.geocities.com/SiliconValley/Vista/2872/

For the 46 family:
Name Platform Type Description
Galaxy Plus Mac Commercial by Opcode
Galaxy Plus is a patch editor and librarian for JV-30, 80, 880, 90, 1000, 1080, 2080, XP-10, 50, 80 and can be found at: http://www.opcode.com/
JV Edit Win 3.1 Freeware by Greg Youngdahl
JV Edit is an excellent patch editor for the JV-80, JV-880, JV-90, JV-1000 synthesizers. It is available at: http://jvedit.webjump.com/
JV Librarian Win 3.1 Freeware by John Walkenbach
JV Librarian is a useful patch/performance/rhythm librarian for the JV-80 and JV-880. It is available at: ftp://synth.pacificrim.net/Pub/Synth/Jv-synths/Jv80/Tools
JV-80 Editor Win3.1
Win95/98
Demo by Laurent Le Bot
JV-80 Editor is a patch editor frontend to the "MIDI Editor" program. It is available at:
NoiZe Win 3.1
Win95/98/NT
Commercial by Terzoid Software
Noize is a patch editor and librarian for JV-80, 880, 90, 1000, 1080, XP-50, 80 and can be found at: http://www.terzoid.com/ A demo version is available for download.
SoundDiver Mac
Win95
Commercial by Emagic
SoundDiver is a patch editor and librarian for JV-80, 880, 90, 1000, 1080, 2080, XP-50, 80 and can be found at: http://www.emagic.de/
Unisyn Mac
Win95/98/NT
Commercial by Mark Of The Unicorn
Unisyn is a librarian and patch editor for JV-35, 80, 880, 90, 1000, 1080, 2080, XP-10, 50, 80 and can be found at: http://www.motu.com/

For the GS family:
Name Platform Type Description
CanvasMan Win 3.1
Win95/98/NT
Shareware by Jeff Cazell
CanvasMan is a good sound/patch editor for the SoundCanvas and GS compatiable synths. Is is available at: http://www.powerjam.com/
Galaxy Plus Mac Commercial by Opcode
Galaxy Plus is a patch editor and librarian for JV-30, 80, 880, 90, 1000, 1080, 2080, XP-10, 50, 80 and can be found at: http://www.opcode.com/
Unisyn Mac
Win95/98/NT
Commercial by Mark Of The Unicorn
Unisyn is a librarian and patch editor for JV-35, 80, 880, 90, 1000, 1080, 2080, XP-10, 50, 80 and can be found at: http://www.motu.com/

 

5.5 How can I change into Performance/Patch/GM mode at the beginning of my song?
This is done by inserting a SysEx MIDI message at the beginning of your song. This is relativley easy with the XP-50, 60 & 80 because the sequencer has an option for inserting SYSEX messages. For other synths you would need to do this with the software you use.

For example to change a 6A family synth into another mode, put one of the following SysEx messages at the beginning of the song:
Performance mode: F0 41 10 6A 12 00 00 00 00 00 00 F7
      Patch mode: F0 41 10 6A 12 00 00 00 00 01 7F F7
      GM mode on: F0 7E 7F 09 01 F7
     GM mode off: F0 7E 7F 09 02 F7

For the 6A family synths, it is recommended to send a GM mode off message, then a short pause then a performance (or patch) mode message. That way you know when someone plays your song the synth will be in the correct mode.

To change modes on a 46 family synth, send one of th following messages:
Performance mode: F0 41 10 46 12 00 00 00 00 00 00 F7
      Patch mode: F0 41 10 46 12 00 00 00 00 01 7F F7

 

5.6 Can I have more than one Rhythm Kit in a Performance?
This question is really for the 46 family and 6A family synths.

Short answer is No, the 6A family reserves part 10 for a rhythm kit, and the 46 family synths reserve part 8 for a rhythm kit.

However there is a work-around. Have a look at this link on the Li'l Chips site. This tutorial explains how to create patches which contain rhythm waveforms, and how to use the rhythm MENU kits available on some expansion boards.
 

5.7 Are there some examples of JV/XP synthesizer music on the Net?
Yes! There are two formats of music to listen to: Audio and MIDI. The difference is Audio files (MP3, WAV, RealAudio, etc) are like listening to a song on a CD. However MIDI files are very small files which contain musical information (like note on/off messages, patch change messages etc) which don't actually contain sound but instructions for the synth to playback.

Audio:
JV XPerience radio is a virtual radio station on www.mp3.com. You can go here and listen to music created by other JV/XP synthesizer users. (However at this stage it only has music from the 6A family. (ie. JV-1010, JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-30, XP-50, XP-60 & XP-80)

MIDI Files:
Although there are thousands of General MIDI files on the Internet, MIDI files that are written specifically for the JV/XP synthesizers will sound MUCH better (because they are made on JV/XP synthesizsers). A good place to start is www.frisbee.net.au/jv/links/. If you search for category "Songs" it should return a list of sites which contain MIDI files for the JV/XP synthesizers.
 

 
Section 6 - TIPS & TRICKS
 
 
6.1 How can I reset the User memory to the Factory Presets?
Warning: the procedures below will erase any USER data (patches/performances/rhythm sets) that you have saved in the synth. Backup your user area first if you want to restore your settings at a later time.

JV-30:
Press [CHORUS] + [REVERB] simultaneously
Press VALUE up

JV-35 & JV-50:
Press [CONTROL] + [MASTER] simultaneously
Press VALUE up

JV-80:
Turn unit off
Hold down lower right hand [8] key
Turn unit on
When "Initalize All Parameter" message is dispayed" press [ENTER]
Press [WRITE]

JV-880:
Press [UTILITY]
Rotate the DATA dial to [Factory preset]
Press [ENTER] twice

JV-1000:
Turn unit off
Hold down [CAPS] key
Turn unit on
Press [ENTER]
Press [WRITE]

JV-1080:
Page 74 of JV-1080 owners manual
Press [UTILITY]
Press [DOWN ARROW] to goto UTILITY MENU 2
Cursor to [FACTORY PRESET] and press [ENTER]
If message comes up about "User Memory Write Protected.", WRITE=[UTILITY], or CANCEL=[EXIT]
Press [ENTER]

JV-2080:
Page 101 of JV-2080 owners manual
Press [UTILITY] to make the indicator light.
Press [F6] (Menu) two times to select MENU 3.
Press [F1] (Factory). The Factory Presets page will appear.
Press [F6] (Execute) to execute the Factory Presets Operation.
The leave the Factory Presets page without executing, press [EXIT] After the Factory Preset operation has been executed, the PATCH Play will appear.
If Write protect On occurs, press [DEC] to set Write Protect Off and press [F6] (OK) to cancel the message. Then press [F6] (Execute) once again to execute the Factory Preset operation.

XP-50:
Page 94 of XP-50 owners manual
Press [DISK/UTILITY]
Press [4] for Sound
Press [5] for Preset
Press [ENTER]
If a message about internal memory write protect appears, press [DEC] to display OFF then press [ENTER]

XP-80:
Page 165 of XP-80 owners manual
Press [UTILITY]
Press [F6] (MENU) to select Menu 3
Press [F1] (PRESET) to select Factory Preset
Press [F6] (EXECUTE)

6.2 Why does the sound stop when changing patches?
This question is only really relevant for the 6A family synths. The GS family and 46 family synths should change patches without an interuption in sound.

On the JV-1080, J-V2080, XP-50, XP-60 & XP-80 when you are playing in Patch mode, and you change patches while there is still sound coming from the patch, the sound does not carry on.

To prevent this change the "Patch Remain" setting under system options to "ON". However there is a disadvantage: When you switch to another patch while there is still sound, a small break in sound may occur and the sound may alter slightly.

This small break in sound is caused if the patch you switched to has different EFX settings from the previous patch. The solution to this is to either turn the EFX off and then change patches, or change between two patches which use the same EFX settings.
 

6.3 Why does the disk drive light stay on (XP's)?
According to the XP-80 manual, this is normal behaviour. The light on the disk drive stays on constantly when the power is on and becomes brighter when the XP is reading or writing to the disk. The disk drive keeps spinning which speeds up access to the disk because the disk drive is always in a ready state.

It is doubtful that this behaviour will wear out your disk drive, however I would recommend removing disks from the drive when you don't need them, because the disks themselves will eventually wear out. (I also do this because it is quieter without a disk spinning).

Warning: Don't remove the disk while it is being read from or written to. The drive light is brighter when there is disk activity.
 

6.4 Can I stop the Play light from flashing (XP's)?
Some XP users have complained that the flashing Stop/Play sequencer button can be distracting when playing live (when not using the sequencer).

To stop it from flashing, go into System, Sequencer, and set SyncMode to REMOTE. But be warned you cannot use the sequencer in this mode (unless you are slaving off another external sequencer of course.) To use the sequencer again, set the SyncMode back to INTERNAL.
 

6.5 Does the JV-2080 have a test mode?
Yes. There is a test mode on the JV-2080. For more information visit Kenji Rikitake's site at: http://www.ne.jp/asahi/bdx/info/bdxtech/jv-2080-test.html

 

 
Section 7 - WHERE TO OBTAIN MORE INFORMATION
 
 
7.1 Is there a Mailing list for the 6A Family synths?
Yes! There is the JV-1080 mailing list, which covers the JV-1080, JV-2080, XP-50, XP-60 and XP-80. To subscribe to the list, send E-mail to majordomo@emccta.com, with "SUBSCRIBE JV1080" in the message body.

Once you are subscribed you can send a message to the list by sending E-mail to: jv1080@emccta.com. You can expect around 10-20 messages per day from the list. If you would prefer a daily digest, then you can subscribe to the digest instead by putting "SUBSCRIBE JV1080-digest" in the message body.

To unsubscribe to the same as above but replace subscribe with unsubscribe. (Note the Email must come from the same address as the subscription request)
 

7.2 Is there a Mailing list for the 46 Family synths?
Yes! There is the JV-80 mailing list which talks mainly about the JV-80 and JV-880 synthesizers. Topics also cover the JV-90 and JV-1000 because they are very similar synths.

To join the JV80 mailing list send E-mail to: jv80-request@burner.com with "subscribe jv80 your.email.address" in the message body.

If you are interested in discusion about the expansion boards and general MIDI sequencing issues, you could also benefit from subscribing to the JV-1080 mailing list mentioned in question 7.1.
 

7.3 Is there a Mailing list for the GS Family synths?
Yes (well sort of). Because these instruments are GM/GS and they are very similar the Roland SoundCanvas series of synths. You may find the Roland SoundCanvas user group mailing list useful.

To join the SoundCanvas Users Group (SCUG) mailing list send E-mail to: majordomo@frisbee.net.au with "subscribe SCUG-List" in the message body.
 

7.4 Is there a FTP site for the JV/XP synths?
Not really any more. There was a site for the 46 Family synths but it seemed to stop working near the end of 1998.

It was at: ftp://kublai.pacificrim.net/Pub/Synth/Jv-synths/
 

7.5 Is there a news group for the JV/XP synths?
There is no newsgroup dedicated to the JV/XP synths, however the rec.music.makers.synth newsgroup is the closest you will find. It talks about any type of music synthesizer, and topics occasionally include the JV/XP range of synths. Because there are a large number of JV/XP owners 'out there' you have a pretty good chance of reaching some of them in this newsgroup, although the specific mailing lists mentioned earlier are a much more useful resource.
 
7.6 How can I contact Roland from the Internet?
Roland Corporation have a WWW site at: www.rolandcorp.com. There are links to Roland US, Roland Japan, and Roland UK. Has far as I know they DO NOT have an E-mail address so PLEASE DON'T ASK.
 
7.7 Is there an IRC channel for the JV/XP Synths?
I have been told that there is a IRC (Internet Relay Chat) channel called #jv1080 for discussion about the JV and XP synths.
 
7.8 What WWW sites have information for JV and XP synths?
This list has become too long to keep in the FAQ. A comprehensive list and search engine are available at: http://www.frisbee.net.au/jv/links/
 
 
Section 8 - CREDITS
 
 
Thanks to all the people on the JV-1080 mailing list who have provided input for this FAQ. Special thanks goes to Mark Vitek <mvitek@emccta.com> for maintaining the JV-1080 mailing list, and Bob Maple <bmaple@burner.com> for maintaining the JV-80 mailing list.

Thanks to Benjamin Tubb <brtubb@cybertron.com>, and Byron Santolucito <BHSPP@jazz.ucc.uno.edu> for their help in various areas.
 

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