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Current Edition: 686 | Saturday 23rd May 2015

Current Edition: 686 | Sat 23rd May 15

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Cops disrupt top offenders’ crime patterns

Friday 9th October 2009

POLICE are targeting the homes of persistent offenders in a bid to drive down crime.
Cops are targeting known offenders in Dewsbury and Mirfield on a daily basis with the aim of keeping them on the straight and narrow.
More than 20 repeat offenders, known in police jargon as red nominals, are currently subject to the socalled disruption visits across Kirklees.
Neighbourhood Policing Teams call at the homes of the criminals sometimes up to twice a day to check what they are up to, and who they are associating with.
Information on the clothes they are wearing and the vehicles they are driving is also then fed into the police intelligence network.
The scheme is being coordinated by the Kirklees Integrated Offender Management Unit and as well as the police other agencies are heavily involved, including the Drugs Intervention Project (DIP), the Probation Service, Lifeline, Job Centre Plus and housing agencies.
This week police visited properties in Thornhill and Chickenley and Insp Jennifer Thompson, of Kirklees Police, said: Its not just about causing them problems, the visits are interlinked with other agencies.
Theyre not like raids, we dont kick their doors down, officers just knock on their door and see if theyre in.
They know were watching them. Sometimes theyre not happy were there, sometimes they give us intelligence.
The disruption visits are aimed particularly at people who have committed burglary offences and are out of prison on licence, out on bail or subject to a community order.
Sgt Chris Piggin, of the Integrated Offender Management Unit, said: Its about addressing the issues of why they are committing these crimes.
We can look at what their individual needs are and get them help from the Drugs Intervention Project if they need it, help with housing or jobs.
Were trying to look at the bigger picture of why they do it and we try to be in the right place at the right time to help them.
If we stop their activities, then the whole community obviously benefits. There have been some success stories and we believe that it is beginning to have an effect on crime rates.
Funding has recently been secured to create a new Integrated Offender Management hub at Dewsbury, which will enable all the agencies to work under one roof. Officials hope to have it up and running by March.

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