background image

Unit 6.3  -  

Malta under the French:  The Blockade  

 

1. The Maltese side of the Blockade 

 
(left: Reynaut d’Angely; right: general Vabois
 
On  3  September  representatives  from 
the villages met at the Banca Giuratale 
at Mdina to set up a National Assembly 
to govern the islands and to continue the 
blockade of the French.  Manwel Vitale 
was  appointed  as  General.    But  the 
representatives  of  Zebbug  and  Zurrieq 

chose  Canon  Francesco  Saverio  Caruana  as  their  Supreme 
Commander who kept his headquarters at Casa Leoni (St Venera).  On 4 
September  the  Maltese  tried  to  assail  the  Cottonera  fortifications  but 
suffered  heavy  losses.    On  5  September  they  took  Fort  St  Thomas 
(M’Xlokk).    The  Maltese  Council  of  War  issued  instructions  regarding  the 
uniform of the Maltese insurgents: a blue coat made from Maltese cotton 
and a black cap made from rabbit’s skin.  Probably it was at this time that 
the  ancient  colours  of  Mdina  (red  white)  were  adopted  as  the  Maltese 
national  colours.    The  National  Assembly  from  the  Banca  Giuratale 
appointed  a  number  of  officials  for  the  administration  of  the  islands: 
Commander-in-Chief,  a  representative  at  the  Court  of  Ferdinand  IV  of 
Naples  and  Sicily,  the  new  sovereign  of  Malta,  a  secretary,  an  artillery 
commander,  an  inspector  of  the  coastal  towers  and  officers  responsible 
for the importation, storage and distribution of grain to the villages.   
 
During the blockade the Maltese had to meet urgent problems as serious 
as those of the French who had been locked up in the Harbour cities.  The 
Maltese National Assembly had to find ways and means to provide shelter 
and  subsistance  for  thousands  of  Maltese    who  were  expelled  from  the 
harbour  cities  by  the  French.    In  April  1799  King  Ferdinand  IV  sent  the 
first  shiploads  of  provisions  from  Sicily.    The  year  1799  gave  most 
peasants  a  bad  harvest  because  most  of  them  had  abandoned  their 
fields  to  join  the  insurgents.      Early  in  1799  a  fever  epidemic  hit  the 

Maltese and  left hundreds  of victims.  The 
cause  of  this  illness  was  the  lack  of  fresh 
meat  and  vegetables.    Victims  suffered 
from  scurvy,  intestinal  diseases  and  night 
blindness.    The  main  hospitals  of    Santo 
Spirito  and  Sawra  Hospital  at  Rabat 
could  not  cater  for  this  emergency.  
Temporary  hospitals  were  set  up  in 
different  villages  such  as  at  the  Bishop’s 

Seminary  in  Mdina,  the  Dominican  Convent  at  Rabat  and  St  Gregory 
Church at Zejtun. 

background image

 

In the first days of the blockade, the Maltese 
leaders  realised  that  they  were  not  strong 
enough to  force the French to surrender the 
harbour  cities  without  foreign  help.  For  this 
reason  they  sent  a  representative  to  the 
Court of Naples to ask for support from King 
Ferdinand  and  from  his  British  allies. 
Admiral  Horatio  Nelson  came  to  Malta  in 
October  1798.    When  he  left  he  left  in  his 

place  some  Portuguese  ships  under  the  of  the  Marquis  Nizza  Reale  to 
blockade  the  harbours.    While  Nelson was  in Malta, the  French surrendered 
the Citadel of Gozo (28

th

 Sept. 1798).  In December 1798 Capt. Alexander 

Ball was sent by Nelson to Malta, to further train the Maltese in their stand 
against the French.  The Maltese, discouraged by the failure of  execution of 
their  compatriots in  Valletta,  began to  lose  heart in the struggle.  It was at 
time that Captain Ball, elected President of the Assembly (Feb. 1799) helped 
to  raise  their  morale.    He  suggested  the  setting  up  of  an  elected  National 
Congress  to  meet  at  San  Anton  Palace.    Ball  was  also  appointed 
representative of the King of Sicily in Malta. 
 
Sir  Thomas  Troubridge  arrived  in  Malta  with  1,200  Neapolitan  troops, 
the first substantial foreign aid given to the Maltese.  In September 1799 
800  British  troops  arrived  under  the  Command  of    General  Thomas 
Graham  who  set  up  his  HQ  at  Villa  D’Aurel  (Gudja).    In  May  1800 
another  900  Neapolitan  soldiers  were  sent  by  King  Ferdinand.    In  June 
1800  another  800  British  troops  came  under  the  command  of  Major-
General Henry Pigot who assumed the command of all the British troops in 
Malta. 
 
The French side of the Blockade 
 
One solution of General Vaubois was to expel 
most  of  the  Maltese  from  the  harbour  cities 
to  economize  in  the  food  resources.    By  the 
time the blockade ended only 7,000 were left 
from 

the 

original 

40,000 

inhabitants.  

Vaubois had no  cash to pay the government 
employees  and  the  garrison.    He  thus 
confiscated  funds  from  the  Universita  dei 
Grani

,  from  the  Monte  di  Pietà,  from  the 

Monte  di  Redenzione

  and  collected  forced 

loans from Maltese middle and upper classes.  He guaranteed payment with 
interest once the blockade ended.   
 
On  5th  September  1798    1,000  French  soldiers  took  part  in  a  sortie  against 
the village of Zabbar.  The plan was to encircle the village, cut it from outside 
help and pillage it to acquire as much provision as they could.  But the French 

background image

found  the  village  completely  deserted.    When  they  entered  into  the  narrow 
streets, a pandemonium broke loose when villagers fired at the enemy from 
the windows and  roofs of the  buildings.   This  sortie was  the last attempt by 
the French to try to break the blockade. 
 
In  December  1798  a  small  group  of  Maltese  inside  Valletta  planned  to 
open  the  gates  of  the  city  to  allow  entrance  to  200  well-armed  villagers 
from  Birkirkara,  Mosta  and  Naxxar.    The  leaders  of  the  plot  were  Dun 
Mikiel  Xerri    (1738-99),  Guliermo  Lorenzi  and  Matthew  Pulis  (a 
quarrantine  officer  at  Monoel  Is.).    Some  French  sentries  at  Marsamxett 
heard  noises  on  the  night  of  12

th

  January  1798  and  spread  the  alarm.  

The plan failed and many of the conspirators were caught and some 40 of 
them were executed by a firing squad at the Palace Square, including Dun 
Mikeil Xerri and Lorenzi.   
 
When  the  blockade  reached  a  stalemate, 
D’Angely  managed  to  escape  to  France  where 
he 

urged 

the 

Government 

to 

send 

reinforcements to Malta.  Doublet, ex-secretary 
of    Grandmaster  Hompesch  was  appointed 
French  Commission  in  his  place.    When 
Napoleon  returned  to  France  from  Egypt  (Oct. 
1799)  and  established  the  Consulate  (Dec. 
1799), the relief of Malta was given top priority.  
4,000 troops left Toulon for Malta but the ships 
carrying them were caught by the British ships 
that  were  blockading  the  islands.    From  then 
onwards no relief was sent from France, and the 
French garrison in Malta was doomed. 
 
By the summer months of 1800 the condition of the French garrison became 
desperate.  In July shortages of food forced Vaubois to introduce rationing.  
In  August,  Bosredon  de  Ransijat  remarked  that  ‘Apart  from  the  donkeys, 
mules  and  horses  which  continued  to  be  slaughtered  and  eaten  as  before, 
the greater part of the dogs and cats as well as a quantity of rats followed 
their  fate.    The  latest  hunt,  made  quite  recently,  for  those  animals  in  the 
military  bakery  netted  55  of  those  frightful  rodents.    It  was  solely  in  this 
locality that one could hope to find them, being bigger than those found in 
other  places.’  Notwithstanding  all  these  efforts,  Vaubois  calculated  that  the 
remaining  provisions  would  last  until  the  beginning  of    September.    When 
the relief force failed to arrive by that time, he accepted the capitulation of 
the islands to the British commanders on 5 September 1800.   
 
 
 

 

 

 

Points to study and remember 

 

1.  The main events and developments of the Maltese side of the Blockade. 
2.  The problems faced by the French garrison.