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That warning has become a global alert. Since the uprising against Assad in March 2011, over 240,000 people have been killed, 4 million Syrians have fled their country, and over 7 million have been displaced.

The headlines are full of the heartbreaking stories of these refugees — including young children — who have died trying to reach safety in other countries. The story of these refugees is deeply tied to the effects of climate change.

"We are experiencing a surprising uptick in global insecurity ... partially due to our inability to manage climate stress." That's how Columbia University professor Marc Levy (who also does studies for the U.S. government) summed it up.

What's happening in Syria and across Europe is part of a larger story that affects us all.

About

Update (12/8/15): The earlier headline and share text for this comic over-emphasized climate change as a proximate cause of the Syrian conflict. This comic aims to show how climate-motivated migration may have contributed to unrest in the region but in no way undermines the role of the Syrian regime has played in the tragic loss of life in the region.

Comic by Audrey Quinn and Jackie Roche. Produced as a collaboration of Years of Living Dangerously and Symbolia Magazine. Used with their kind permission. Want to help Syrian refugees? Consider donating to the International Rescue Committee, Save the Children, or CARE.

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