Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career

Top-performers seem like they have it all. They’re…

  • Highly motivated & Ambitious
  • Smart & Educated
  • Striving to be the best in all areas of their life

But the unspoken secret is that on the inside many of them feel like they’re:

  • Constantly taking on way too much
  • Always making sacrifices
  • Fighting a losing battle against self-doubt and unhappiness

The truth is that these thoughts are natural, and if you feel that despite all of your accomplishments you’re still not at peace with yourself, you’re not alone.

Unfortunately there is a flipside to success that can deeply affect the types of women who are always trying to achieve more. The emotional intelligence and ambition that often give them their edge can unfortunately also lead them to feel an increased sense of self-doubt and sabotages them from fully enjoying their achievements.

Sometimes they feel like they’re just on an incredible string of luck and are constantly afraid that their next project will be the failure that exposes them as a fraud (Imposter Syndrome). Others worry that with each new accomplishment what they’ve achieved is too good to be true and it’s going to come crashing down sooner rather than later (Upper Limit Problem). Or their success is overshadowed by baggage from dysfunctional relationships and negative patterns that follow them into the office.

Your success doesn’t have to be a source of suffering.

The good news is that many women have overcome the emotional challenges that come with success. I’m Melody, and as a licensed therapist I’ve found my calling helping women like you put an end to the cycles of guilt and unhappiness that hold you back from a lasting and balanced feeling of fulfillment.

What would it mean for you if you could fully enjoy your next promotion or achievement, instead of immediately worrying about whether you’re going to live up to the additional responsibility? How much more could you do each day if you were fully engaged instead of having the complications of a rocky relationship constantly dividing your attention? Don’t you deserve to be confident and content instead of always comparing yourself to others and feeling like you don’t measure up?

If you’re ready to break away from your self-destructive behaviors, I’d love to help you out. Subscribe to my email list for practical, weekly guidance to help you master your psychology using therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career.

h.s.

Working with Melody has changed my perspective not only on my career, but on my life. Her coaching fits what ambitious women need: actionable, no-nonsense advice that takes into account the various demands competing for our attention and time each day. If you’re ever questioning how your career fits into your life, work with Melody.

- H.S., NYC-based PR Professional

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Master your psychology with therapeutic insights for your life, relationships, & career