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Convening September 10-12, 2016 in The Hague

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The questions presented here address a range of issues including policy, process and logistics. The answers result from discussions with the GPM development team, mayors, intercity associations and international experts in governance.

 

The GPM development team will continue to refine and update these details.

 

 

Question:  How will the GPM represent the world's cities: large and small, rich and poor, north and south and not discriminate against rural communities?

 

Answer:  For the inaugural GPM, mayors from cities with populations of 250,000 are being invited. However, requests from cities with smaller populations will also be considered, particularly if one mayor is designated to represent several smaller cities in a region. As the GPM grows, there will also be a focus on "metro-regions".  The GPM will, in its policy focus and representation, assure that issues of inequality, poverty and discrimination are fully addressed.

 

Question:  How often will the GPM convene and where?

 

Answer: The inaugural GPM will convene in The Hague, 10-12 September 2016.  The GPM will aim to convene at least once a year for a major gathering of mayors. Additional regional meetings throughout the year to progress agenda items are also being considered. 

 

A true governing body must meet regularly to promptly address new issues and we know that mayors have many responsibilities that make attending frequent GPM sessions impossible. An effective GPM will thus benefit greatly from a virtual platform that permits mayors to meet, deliberate and reach decisions over the web, from their offices, and the GPM Project Team is in discussion with potential providers.

 

Question:  What are the obligations of a membership in the GPM?

 

Answer: The draft obligations of GPM membership will be defined by a 'task force' of mayors with the assistance of advisors including Tom Cochran, CEO & Executive Director of the US Conference of Mayors. These details will be circulated to mayors shortly, with the expectation that the full definition of membership will be confirmed following the inaugural GPM.

 

 

Question:  Why do we need a GPM?

 

Answer: The GPM will be a governing body FOR MAYORS addressing issues of power and politics, not a consultative association or knowledge sharing facility. It will be integrated and multi-issue rather than siloed and single-issue; a "keystone" in the existing arch of networks.

 

The GPM can only work if mayors and their constituents find a direct benefit for their cities in the work of the GPM.

 

 

Question:  How will the GPM represent  the world's cities: large and small, rich and poor, north and south  and not discriminate against rural communities?

 

Answer:  For the inaugural GPM, mayors from cities with populations of 250,000 are being invited. However, requests from cities with smaller populations will also be considered, particularly if one mayor is designated to represent several smaller cities in a region.  There will also be a focus on "metro-regions".  The GPM will, in its policy focus and representation, assure that issues of inequality, poverty and discrimination are fully addressed.

 

 

Question: Which cities will attend the inaugural GPM?

 

Answer: Cities are being chosen with input from engaged mayors and mayors associations, by global importance and regional distribution.  The selection process will be configured to reflect mayoral elections.

 

 

Question: How will the GPM be funded?

 

Answer: The GPM will agree and institute a self-funding mechanism with a modest and sliding-scale schedule of dues among its members that guarantee financial viability and political autonomy.  The GPM development team will provide a range of options prior to the inaugural GPM and the mayors themselves will decide by vote how to finance the GPM.  

 

There are no mandatory financial obligations for attending the inaugural sessions.

 

 

Question:  What are the obligations of a membership in the GPM?

 

Answer: The draft obligations of GPM membership will be defined by a 'task force' of mayors with the assistance of advisors including Tom Cochran, CEO & Executive Director of the US Conference of Mayors. These details will be circulated to mayors shortly, with the expectation that the full definition of membership will be confirmed following the inaugural GPM.

 

 

Question: What is the co-operation with existing city networks?

 

Answer: The GPM is founded on the crucial and ongoing work done by existing urban networks. Each mayor committing to the GPM will be their city's representative of one or more city networks providing a new environment for collaboration.

 

 

Question: In a world of nation-states and supranational entities like the EU, will cities have the resources and jurisdictional authority to undertake the difficult work of global governance?

 

Answer:  No, they do not have sufficient resources and jurisdictional autonomy for "unfunded mandates"; it is one of the most important aims of a GPM to develop a "right of the city" platform for to secure the resources and jurisdictional autonomy necessary to discharging local and global responsibilities. Indeed, they often are charged with responsibility for problems without receiving resources—so-called "unfunded mandates".

 

 

Question: Can a GPM really be a world government with a command and control architecture?

 

Answer: No it cannot, and should not aspire to be that. It should be a bottom-up,  “soft governance” institution that works through influencing other levels of governance and the civic and private sector with sound policies and effective solutions. Global public opinion must also be its target.

 

 

Information correct as of February 15 2016

 

 

 

 

 

 

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