Feedback over 44 orders of magnitude: from Gamma-rays to the Universe

Conference Date: 
Monday, March 14, 2016 (All day) to Wednesday, March 16, 2016 (All day)
Scientific Areas: 
Cosmology

 

Active galactic nuclei feedback drives structure formation in the universe, imparting cosmological consequences by supermassive black holes. Typically this feedback acts locally, arising from the prodigious luminosity of quasars or mechanical power of jets. However, it has become apparent that non-local feedback may also occur on cosmological scales via a chain of events that begins with the very-high energy gamma-ray emission of blazars and ends with the heating of the low-density intergalactic medium, increasing its temperature by more than an order of magnitude. The viability of this mechanism depends critically on the nonlinear development of beam-plasma instabilities driven by the propagating very-high energy gamma rays; the observational impact requires large-scale cosmological simulations of the Lyman-alpha forest and the formation of dwarfs to infer.  This workshop will bring researchers across a number of disciplines together, including astrophysical plasma physics, high-energy gamma-ray astronomy, Lyman-alpha forest studies, and cosmological structure formation to foster collaborative interactions among them.

Registraton for this workshop is now closed.

  • Marco Ajello, Clemson University
  • Antoine Bret, University of Castilla-La Mancha
  • Avery Broderick, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo
  • Philip Chang, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Frederico Fiuza, SLAC Stanford University
  • Martin Haehnelt, University of Cambridge
  • Jim Hinton, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics
  • Ulrich Kolberg, Ruhr University
  • Steffen Krakau, Ruhr University
  • Astrid Lamberts, California Institute of Technology
  • Matthew McQuinn, University of Washington
  • Eileen Meyer, University of Maryland
  • Houjun Mo, University of Massachusetts
  • Christoph Pfrommer, Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies
  • Till Sawala, Durham University
  • Reinhard Schlickeiser, University Bochum
  • Mohamad Shalaby, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo
  • Jean-Luc Vay, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • Stefan Wagner, University of Heidelberg
  • Marco Ajello, Clemson University
  • Antoine Bret, University of Castilla-La Mancha
  • Avery Broderick, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo
  • Philip ChangUniversity of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Frederico Fiuza, SLAC Stanford University
  • Ruth Gregory, Durham University
  • Daniel Guariento, Perimeter Institute
  • Martin Haehnelt, University of Cambridge
  • Jim Hinton, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics
  • Ulrich Kolberg, Ruhr University
  • Steffen Krakau, Ruhr University
  • Astrid Lamberts, California Institute of Technology
  • Matthew McQuinn, University of Washington
  • Eileen Meyer, University of Maryland
  • Houjun Mo, University of Massachusetts
  • Christoph Pfrommer, Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies
  • Till Sawala, Durham University
  • Reinhard Schlickeiser, University Bochum
  • Mohamad Shalaby, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo
  • Jean-Luc Vay, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
  • Stefan Wagner, University of Heidelberg

Monday, March 14, 2016

Time

Event

Location

8:30 – 9:00am

Registration

Reception

9:00 – 9:05am

Welcome and Opening Remarks

Bob Room

9:05 – 9:45am

Christoph Pfrommer, Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies
30000 foot view of blazar heating

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:30am

Antoine Bret, University of Castilla-La Mancha
The basics and not-so-basic physics of beam plasmas

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00 – 11:45am

Jim Hinton, Max-Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics
The Basics of the Gamma-ray Sky:
current observational status and future perspectives

Bob Room

11:45 – 12:30pm

Matthew McQuinn, University of Washington
The thermal state of the intergalactic medium
and its effect on galaxy formation

Bob Room

12:30 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd Floor

2:00 – 2:45pm

Hojun Mo, University of Massachusetts
Models of Galaxy formation:
Current constraints on the star formation history and feedback

Bob Room

2:45 – 3:30pm

Phil Chang, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Nonlinear Plasma Instabilities

Bob Room

3:30 – 3:50pm

Ulrich Kolberg, Ruhr University
Spontaneously emitted field fluctuations in the IGM and the generation of magnetic seed fields

Bob Room

3:50 – 4:20pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

4:20pm – 5:30pm

Discussion 1:
Are plasma instabilities necessary? 
Does blazar heating solve any problems?

Bob Room

Tuesday, March 15, 2016

Time

Event

Location

9:00 – 9:45am

Martin Haehnelt, University of Cambridge
Ewald Puchwein, University of Cambridge (absent)
The thermal state of the IGM

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:30am

Reinhard Schlickeiser, University Bochum
Magnetic fields in the early universe and beam-plasma instabilities

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00 – 11:45am

Eileen Meyer, University of Maryland
Implications of TeV emission of quasars

Bob Room

11:45 – 12:30pm

Marco Ajello, Clemson University
The Fermi view of the (hard) blazar population

Bob Room

12:30 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd Floor

2:00 – 2:45pm

Astrid Lamberts, California Institute of Technology
Patchy Blazar Heating

Bob Room

2:45 – 3:05pm

Mohamad Shalaby, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo
Nonlinear beam plasma simulations

Bob Room

3:05 – 3:25pm

Steffen Krakau, Ruhr University
Plasma effects on extra galactic ultra high energy cosmic ray
hadron beams in cosmic voids

Bob Room

3:25 – 3:55pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

3:55 – 5:00pm

Discussion 2:
What are the outstanding challenges of IGM observations?
Does the Gamma-ray sky tell us anything about cosmic
history of TeV blazars?

Bob Room

5:30pm onwards

Banquet

Bistro – 2nd Floor

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Time

Event

Location

9:00 – 9:45am

Stefan Wagner, University of Heidelberg
TeV emission from blazars:
physical models meet observations

Bob Room

9:45 – 10:30am

Till Sawala, Durham University
Local group simulations of galaxy formation with blazar heating

Bob Room

10:30 – 11:00am

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

11:00 – 11:45am

Frederico Fiuza, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
Experimental plasma physics

Bob Room

11:45 – 12:30pm

Avery Broderick, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo
Gamma-ray Halos

Bob Room

12:30 – 2:00pm

Lunch

Bistro – 2nd Floor

2:00 – 3:30pm

Colloquium
Martin Haehnelt, University of Cambridge
Probing dark matter with the Lyman-alpha forest

Theater

3:30 – 4:00pm

Coffee Break

Bistro – 1st Floor

4:00 – 4:45pm

Jean-Luc Vay, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
recent advances in Particle-In-Cell simulations of relativistic plasmas

Bob Room

4:45 – 5:30pm

Discussion 3:
Can galaxy formation constrain pre-heating
or post-heating of the IGM?
How can the nonlinear regime of beam-plasma instabilities
be tackled?

Bob Room

 

 

Marco Ajello, Clemson University

The Fermi view of the (hard) blazar population

Antoine Bret, University of Castilla-La Mancha

The basics and not-so-basic physics of beam plasmas

Avery Broderick, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo

Gamma-ray Halos

Philip Chang, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee

Nonlinear Plasma Instabilities

Frederico Fiuza, SLAC Stanford University

Experimental plasma physics

Martin Haehnelt, University of Cambridge and
Ewald Puchwein, University of Cambridge

The thermal state of the IGM

Jim Hinton, Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics

The Basics of the Gamma-ray Sky:  current observational status and future perspectives

Ulrich Kolberg, Ruhr University

Spontaneously emitted field fluctuations in the IGM and the generation of magnetic seed fields

Steffen Krakau, Ruhr University

Plasma effects on extra galactic ultra high energy cosmic ray hadron beams in cosmic voids

Astrid Lamberts, California Institute of Technology

Patchy Blazar Heating

Matthew McQuinn, University of Washington

The thermal state of the intergalactic medium and its effect on galaxy formation

Eileen Meyer, University of Maryland

Implications of TeV emission of quasars

Houjun Mo, University of Massachusetts

Models of Galaxy formation:  Current constraints on the star formation history and feedback

Christoph Pfrommer, Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies

30000 foot view of blazar heating

Till Sawala, Durham University

Local group simulations of galaxy formation with blazar heating

Reinhard Schlickeiser, University Bochum

Magnetic fields in the early universe and beam-plasma instabilities

Mohamad Shalaby, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo

Nonlinear beam plasma simulations

Jean-Luc Vay, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

recent advances in Particle-In-Cell simulations of relativistic plasmas

Stefan Wagner, University of Heidelberg

TeV emission from blazars:  physical models meet observations

 

 

Pages

Scientific Organizers:

  • Avery Broderick, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo
  • Philip Chang, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
  • Astrid Lamberts, California Institute of Technology
  • Christoph Pfrommer, Heidelberg Institute for Theoretical Studies
  • Ewald Puchwein, University of Cambridge
  • Mohamad Shalaby, Perimeter Institute & University of Waterloo