Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump addresses the audience during a campaign event at Trask Coliseum in Wilmington, N.C., on Tuesday. Sara D. Davis/Getty Images hide caption

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Politics

Trump Suggests 'Second Amendment People' Could Stop Clinton

Falsely charging that Hillary Clinton wanted to "abolish the Second Amendment," the GOP nominee then appeared to many observers to suggest taking up arms against her. Trump's campaign says he only was talking about the political resolve of gun owners.

Nicholas Rasmussen, Director of the National Counterterrorism Center in McLean, Va. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Parallels - World News

Counterterror Chief Sees Gains On The Battlefield, Stubborn Threats At Home

Nick Rasmussen, director of the National Counterterrorism Center, says progress against the Islamic State may be slow to affect the terror attacks plaguing the West.

Counterterror Chief Sees Gains On The Battlefield, Stubborn Threats At Home

Audio will be available later today.

Russian tennis star Maria Sharapova won't be competing at the 2016 Olympics. At a March 7 press conference in Los Angeles she told reporters she'd tested positive for meldonium, a prescription heart drug that improves blood flow. It was banned in January by the World Anti-Doping Agency. Robyn Beck/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Olympic Athletes Still Use Some Rx Drugs As A Path To 'Legal Doping'

Hundreds of elite endurance athletes were taking the prescription heart drug meldonium until it was banned in January. But a similar heart drug, telmisartan, is still allowed.

Olympic Athletes Still Use Some Rx Drugs As A Path To 'Legal Doping'

Audio will be available later today.
Sally Deng for NPR

Goats and Soda

Why The World Isn't Close To Eradicating Guinea Worm

Health officials thought they were close to wiping out the parasite. It's been President Carter's dream for decades. But the dogs of Chad have turned out to be a major problem.

Why The World Isn't Close To Eradicating Guinea Worm

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Pump jacks dot the landscape outside Midland, a West Texas oil town. Ilana Panich-Linsman for NPR hide caption

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The New Middle

Texas Town's Fortunes Rise And Fall With Pump Jacks And Oil Prices

The middle class has shrunk faster in Midland, Texas, than nearly anywhere else in the U.S. Overall, more people are getting rich than falling behind. But extreme booms and busts make life precarious.

Texas Town's Fortunes Rise And Fall With Pump Jacks And Oil Prices

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Nurse specialist Annelie Nilsson checks on patient Janet Prochazka, during her stay at the Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, after Prochazka took a bad fall in March. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Hospital Units Tailored To Older Patients Can Help Prevent Decline

Kaiser Health News

Elderly hospital patients often arrive sick and leave worse off. But some hospitals are preventing these sharp declines by treating the elderly in units that minimize bedrest and spur mobility.

Hospital Units Tailored To Older Patients Can Help Prevent Decline

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The Chickasaw National Recreation Area used to be called Platt National Park until 1976, when it lost its status as a National Park. NPS Cultural Landscapes/Flickr hide caption

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National Park Service Centennial

In Oklahoma, A National Park That Got Demoted

National parks are a big source of local pride, but about half the U.S. states don't have one. Oklahoma is among the park-less, but it wasn't always that way.

In Oklahoma, A National Park That Got Demoted

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Passengers wait at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport after a computer systems failure on Monday caused Delta to delay or cancel hundreds of flights. Branden Camp/AP hide caption

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All Tech Considered

Why The Airline Industry Could Keep Suffering System Failures Like Delta's

Delta's massive outage wasn't the first malfunction to wreak havoc on an airline. The industry's systems are complex and require high security, which can make them more prone to shutdowns.

Why The Airline Industry Could Keep Suffering System Failures Like Delta's

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Christian Choe, Zach Rosenthal, and Maria Filsinger Interrante, who call themselves Team Lyseia, strategize about experiments to test their new antibiotics. Linda A. Cicero/Stanford News /Courtesy of Stanford University hide caption

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Shots - Health News

Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

Many of the most powerful antibiotics have lost their punch. Some Stanford students think they've found a different way to attack bacteria that the germs can't overcome.

Young Inventors Work On Secret Proteins To Thwart Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

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Colored scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria (green) taken from the small intestine of a child. E. coli are rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal flora of the human gut. Stephanie Schuller/Science Source hide caption

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Shots - Health News

How The Microbes Inside Us Went From Enemies To Purported Superhealers

Science writer Ed Yong talks about his new book, which looks at diet and the microbiome, and whether poop transplants and probiotics are all they're cracked up to be.

Indian political activist Irom Sharmila is taken back to a hospital after a court appearance in the state of Manipur on Tuesday, a few hours before she ended her fast. Anupam Nath/AP hide caption

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The Two-Way - News Blog

India's 'Iron Lady' Ends 16-Year Hunger Strike, Plans To Run For Office

Irom Sharmila stopped eating in 2000 to protest a law that gives broad powers to security forces in her home state of Manipur. She was arrested and has been force-fed ever since.