Remembering the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 in the Florida Keys

By: Bob Henson , 5:50 PM GMT on September 07, 2015

As Tropical Storm Grace struggles in the Atlantic (see below), today offers a chance to commemorate the victims of a much more devastating cyclone. Eighty years ago, on this federal holiday that recognizes U.S. workers, a group of World War I veterans toiling to improve life on the Florida Keys lost their lives in one of the great workplace tragedies of U.S. history. The strongest landfalling hurricane on record in the Western Hemisphere brought Category 5 winds and a terrifying storm surge to the upper Florida Keys on the late evening of Monday, September 2, 1935. The compact Labor Day hurricane of 1935 developed very rapidly from a system that was classified as a tropical storm less than two days before landfall in the Keys. Brushing the south end of Andros Island, it headed toward the north coast of Cuba before angling unexpectedly rightward and intensifying with astonishing speed as it approached the Keys, passing over the very warm waters of the Florida Straits. As the hurricane barreled across the Keys on Monday night, local weather observer Ivar Olsen measured 26.35” (892 mb) with a barometer that was later tested and proven reliable at the Weather Bureau. This remains the lowest value ever measured by a ground-based station in a tropical cyclone in the Western Hemisphere. (Dropsondes released by reconaissance aircraft produced sea-level pressure measurements of 882 mb on October 19, 2005, during Hurricane Wilma, and 870 mb on October 12, 1979, during Typhoon Tip). The 1935 hurricane went on to skirt the west coast of the Florida peninsula before accelerating northeastward, reentering the Atlantic off the Virginia coastline and producing rains that topped 16” in Maryland.


Figure 1. Track of the 1935 Labor Day hurricane.


Figure 2. Surface weather analysis from the U.S. Weather Bureau for September 4, 1935, showing the Labor Day hurricane two days after it struck the Keys. NOAA, via Wikipedia.

The storm’s rapid development combined with several other factors to produce the human tragedy that resulted. No satellite monitoring was available in 1935, and ships avoided tropical cyclones for good reason. As a result, forecasters at a brand-new Hurricane Warning Center, established that year in Jacksonville, Florida, by the U.S. Weather Bureau, could only surmise from nearby surface stations how quickly the storm was developing and how its motion was evolving. Persistence forecasting suggested that the storm’s west-southwest motion would take it to the north coast of Cuba, but there was little sign of its approach there on Monday morning. An American “barnstormer” pilot with the Cuba Army Air Corps, Capt. Leonard Povey, volunteered to carry out what is believed to be the first-ever hurricane-hunter flight, approaching the storm on Monday afternoon in an open-cockpit Curtis Hawk II aircraft. Povey found the hurricane further north than expected, and a hurricane warning was issued for the Keys at 4:30 pm, just a few hours before the hurricane struck full force.


Figure 3. Drawings of the Curtis Hawk II aircraft that Capt. Leonard Povey used to investigate the 1935 Labor Day hurricane in the world’s first known “hurricane hunter” flight. Image credit: NOAA Hurricane Research Division.


Figure 4. The rescue train derailed by the 1935 Labor Day hurricane before it had a chance to rescue the hundreds of veterans stationed on the Keys. Image credit: Wikipedia.

The most heartbreaking parts of the saga are vividly told in “Storm of the Century: The Labor Day Hurricane of 1935” (National Geographic, 2002), which I reviewed for Weatherwise magazine. (This interview with author Willie Drye hits many of the main points.) Hundreds of veterans had been deployed to the Keys to build the most difficult sections of the highway that now runs the length of the island chain, from Key West to Miami. Many veterans of World War I had struggled to find work and deal with postwar life, and the Great Depression hit them particularly hard. At the Keys, they were housed in hastily built barracks and tents that stood no chance of surviving a Category 5 hurricane. Superiors recognized the potential for disaster if a hurricane were to strike, but as “Storm of the Century” recounts in agonizing detail, a series of miscues--ranging from slack holiday schedules to telephone miscommunications to obstructions along the railway track to simple inertia--meant that a rescue train ran hours later than it should have. The train ended up pushed off its tracks by the storm; miraculously, everyone on board survived, but the train had not yet reached hundreds of the most vulnerable workers. At least 257 veterans and 228 civilians died in the winds and storm surge of that horrifying evening. (See video at bottom, which includes recent interviews with two survivors.]

How much at risk are the Keys today?
An 80th-anniversary symposium held on September 2 at the Keys History & Discovery Center in Key West looked back at the awful events of 1935 from the perspective of today’s hurricane risk. The presenters included local historian Jerry Wilkinson, who has studied the hurricane for decades and worked to establish permanent individual markers for the lost veterans, and former National Hurricane Center director Max Mayfield, who discussed the current landscape of NWS and NHC hurricane warnings and the continued vulnerability of the Keys. A second night of commemoration will take place Tuesday, September 8, at the Keys History & Discovery Center. Curator Brad Bertelli will join British-based novelist and Florida native Vanessa Lafaye, author of “Under a Dark Summer Sky,” a work of historical fiction set during the 1935 hurricane.

Also participating in the September 2 event was Matt Moreland, who this spring became meteorologist in charge at the Key West NWS office--which began as an observing post in 1870, the same year that the NWS was established. In a phone chat, Moreland emphasized that the placid weather of the Key West location during much of the year is counterbalanced by the location’s risk to hurricane impacts. “Something like the 1935 hurricane still represents our worst-case scenario--a hurricane going from Category 1 to Cat 5 in 36 hours,” said Moreland. “Once you get to Cat 3 or higher, there is a threat of extensive flooding for all of the islands, and portions of the Overseas Highway as well.” On any given day, about 100,000 residents and tourists are strung along the 120-mile stretch of the Keys, which have only one highway escape route. It’s estimated that a full evacuation (including residents, tourists, and those with special needs) would need to begin 84 hours in advance.


Figure 5. A couple walks hand in hand as they brave flood waters several feet deep along South Street in Key West, Florida, after Hurricane Wilma passed through in the early morning hours of October 24, 2005. Along with some wind damage, the majority of the island was indundated. Image credit: Josh Ritchie/Getty Images.

The Keys have had several close calls this century, including 2005’s Hurricane Rita, which was in the process of intensifying to a Cat 3 while crossing over the Florida Straits south of the Keys. “If the track had come 30 or 40 miles further north, the lower Keys would have seen extensive damage,” said Moreland. “That kind of track error is not uncommon at 24 hours out.” Later in 2005, Hurricane Wilma flooded more than 60% of Key West, destroyed more than 10,000 vehicles, and inflicted more than $1 billion in damage across Monroe County (which includes all of the Keys). One of Moreland’s biggest concerns is complacency, along with the high turnover of the workers that keep tourism humming along the Keys. Outreach and decision support are critical parts of the NWS/Key West mission. Moreland and colleagues work year-round to maintain close ties with a wide range of partners, including local, county, and regional emergency managers; federal entities from the Coast Guard to the Navy to the National Park Service; and the Monroe County Tourist Development Council, which provides storm updates with official NWS information to hotels and resorts. According to Moreland, these strong relationships and the office’s teamwork-oriented approach ensure that decision makers in the Keys stay vigilant against the prospect of a 1935-type storm.


Figure 6. At the September 2, 2015, commemoration of the Labor Day 1935 hurricane at the Keys History & Discovery Center: (left to right) NWS/Key West forecaster Bill Cottrill; former NHC director Max Mayfield; NWS/Key West forecaster Krizia Negron; and NWS/Key West meteorologist in charge Matt Moreland. Image credit: Courtesy Matt Moreland.


Figure 7. A visible GOES-East satellite image of highly sheared Tropical Storm Grace, collected at 1545 GMT (11:45 am EDT) on Monday, September 7, 2015. Image credit: NOAA/NESDIS.

Grace under fire; Gulf bears watching later this week
Tropical Storm Grace failed to take advantage of the usual nighttime bump in thunderstorm activity, and it appears that Grace’s window for becoming a stronger system is rapidly closing. Wind shear to Grace’s north is forcing shower and thunderstorm activity toward Grace’s south side, as was the case with Tropical Storm Erika a few days ago. As Grace continues westward through the central Atlantic, with winds of only 45 mph, it will encounter increasing westerly wind shear and relatively dry air. In its 11 am EDT update, NHC projects Grace to be a post-tropical remnant low south of Puerto Rico by Saturday. Dynamical models are in general agreement, save for the suspiciously bullish GFDL model.

A weak upper-level low and surface trough now producing scattered thunderstorms in the eastern Gulf of Mexico will drift slowly westward through the week, perhaps intersecting with the tail end of a cool front in the western Gulf by this weekend. The 0000 GMT Monday run of the European model suggests the possiblity of some hybrid/subtropical development this weekend in the far western Gulf, with very rich moisture surging toward the Texas/Louisiana coast, and the 1200 GMT Monday run of the GFS model shows low surface pressure taking shape in the Bay of Campeche over the weekend. We’ll have plenty of time to watch for this potential development.

In the Northeast Pacific, Hurricane Linda has surged to Category 2 intensity, with top sustained winds of 100 mph. Linda may reach Category 3 strength before a rapid decline begins, as the hurricane’s track takes it toward progressively cooler water and drier air. Dynamical models generally turn Linda westward by the weekend, although some of Linda’s moisture may stream into the southwest United States later this week. Further west, Typhoon Kilo continues its slow weakening and recurvature well east of Hawaii, while newborn Tropical Storm Etau could bring heavy rain to Japan later this week as a weak tropical storm or depression.

Have a great Labor Day, everyone!

Bob Henson


Video 1. This Miami Herald video includes compelling photos from the Labor Day hurricane of 1935, as well as new interviews with Everett Albury and Alma Pinder Dalton, who were 6 and 11 when the hurricane struck. Video credit: Jenny Staletovich/Miami Herald staff. Thanks to wunderground member barbamz for locating this video.

Reader Comments

Comments will take a few seconds to appear.

Post Your Comments

Please sign in to post comments.

Log In or Join

Not only will you be able to leave comments on this blog, but you'll also have the ability to upload and share your photos in our Wunder Photos section.

Display: 0, 50, 100, 200 Sort: Newest First - Order Posted

Viewing: 379 - 329

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8Blog Index

379. vis0
10:59 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Thank you Mr Henson for a part of history that no one should forget.Labor Day Hurricane of 1935 presents the power of nature and the importance of always being prepared, how even professionals have trouble when nature creates sudden changes, so the common joe & jane should pay attention to when any TS is near by..
Member Since: December 15, 2006 Posts: 265 Comments: 3446
378. georgevandenberghe
5:13 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 339. ariot:

Seriously though, if the El Nino burst causes early frosts back East, peeps with temperature models and later on, forecasts, need to get to steppin'.

The last early frost I recall in the middle south (when living there) was mid October of 2009.

People south of the Mason-Dixon aren't ready for that at the end of September or early October, unless they are mountain people who are pretty much ready for whatever, I'm told :-P

(I'm talking about #306 and the 8C swing that could turn up the weather volume)


There is a weak negative correlation between El NIno and fall temperatures in the Mid Atlantic. It's slightly cooler than long term mean in El Nino falls. Other terms are stronger and I'm not anticipating early frost this
{ mopping soaked brow }
year.

Most young people in large parts of the country don't realize how late the frost threat goes in spring and early in fall.. it takes a once a decade or two event to drive that point home.

For frost, the fall of 1974 stands out with killing frosts several weeks early in the upper midwest (MN) around Labor day, in most of the midwest Sept 22-23, and in the DC metro exurbs Sept 24. Another outbreak produced killing frosts in almost all of the DC metro area October 3-4 (inner urban cores only escaped) and this event caused the peanut crop to freeze as far south as Southern VA east of the Piedmont but inland from tidewater. After mid October, the pattern turned mild and winter 1974-75 was fairly gentle.

There are no outstanding frosty springs in my memory.
Member Since: February 1, 2012 Posts: 19 Comments: 4977
377. PedleyCA
4:15 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 374. redwagon:



Our forecast has been 99s with actuals being 104/116 here in the Balcones Feudal Settlement, Centex. Inland Empire??


Counties Riverside, San Bernardino, Los Angeles (eastern portions)
Ten largest cities by population (2010 U.S. Census) - Riverside (RV)
- San Bernardino (SB)
- Fontana (SB)
- Moreno Valley (RV)
- Rancho Cucamonga (SB)
- Ontario (SB)
- Corona (RV)
- Victorville (SB)
- Temecula (RV)
- Murrieta (RV)
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 8237
376. Barefootontherocks
4:03 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Perhaps President Obama's trying to circumvent Senate advice and consent.

From the link Patrap posted at 309:

"In Paris, representatives of nearly 200 nations will try to hammer out an agreement for curbing the greenhouse gas emissions blamed for warming the planet and boosting sea levels. By design, the State Department is pushing for a broad political agreement that has buy-in from each country but won't carry the legal authority of a treaty - getting around the Constitution's requirement that treaties be ratified through a two-thirds vote in the Senate."...

"I don't see anything [Republicans in Congress] can do other than express their view," said Jeremy Rabkin, a George Mason University professor who teaches international law.

"But Rabkin, a critic of the administration's climate policies, added that Obama can't bind future presidents to the agreement if it isn't a treaty. 'You live by the rhetoric, you die by the rhetoric,' he said."

Read more: http://www.politico.com/story/2015/09/gop-congress -climate-pact-paris-213382#ixzz3lAB9bEZP

Once again, glad to have read beyond the headline.
Member Since: April 29, 2006 Posts: 173 Comments: 21733
375. WunderAlertBot (Admin)
3:58 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
JeffMasters has created a new entry.
374. redwagon
3:39 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 371. TimSoCal:



FUN.

Although, this is probably the last heat wave before we start cooling down.


Our forecast has been 99s with actuals being 104/116 here in the Balcones Feudal Settlement, Centex. Inland Empire??
Member Since: August 4, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 3628
373. PedleyCA
3:36 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 371. TimSoCal:



FUN.

Although, this is probably the last heat wave before we start cooling down.


WU only has you down for 101F, here they have 104F, doubt it will make that, but you never know.
Currently 76.7 here.
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 8237
372. islander101010
3:34 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
a tiny low amplitude tw is about to move through the ABCs. persistent and now vigorous.
Member Since: September 11, 2010 Posts: 3 Comments: 6747
371. TimSoCal
3:26 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 365. PedleyCA:


San Fernando Valley is 3-4° Hotter than these temps....


FUN.

Although, this is probably the last heat wave before we start cooling down.
Member Since: July 9, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1235
370. Skyepony (Mod)
3:23 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 364. sar2401:

Generally, an actual forecast does better than a model.



Did you miss the near live satellite pic there? The blow up of convection near the center of the weak low already looks better than it ever has over water. Generally actual weather observations do better than a forecast. It is really not uncommon to get a 50kt wind report or tree damage indicative of such with a little weather...especially near the ocean on a hot day. I see thunderstorms are in the forecast..Seems silly to throw out the chance of such with the way the satellite looks.
Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 404 Comments: 43526
369. brandyn
3:22 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 362. BayFog:


Impressive for now, but as soon as it hits that magic SST barrier just south of Point Eugenia (the cape that juts out midway up the peninsula), it will shred, top flying away and eddy drifting and fading out to sea, as per the usual.

The unusual will only occur if one of these coastal hurricanes phases with a properly-oriented early season front off the California coast. Hasn't happened in our lifetimes. May have happened back in the 19th century.


I wonder how the outcome would change if Point Conception extended 100 miles more to the west :)

LA tropics ;)
Member Since: September 6, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 23
368. ariot
3:17 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 356. sar2401:

Define "middle South". The record early frost in Montgomery AL was October 20, 1989. It was probably seven or eight days later in Eufaula, but we don't have records going back very far. 1989 was the end of a strong La Nina year, getting ready to transition to a neutral year. El Nino is given far too much credit for individual extreme events. The only thing that can be said with certainty is that a strong el Nino usually causes slightly below average winter temperatures and about 10% above average rainfall in the deep South. Not one earliest freeze in Alabama occured in even a moderate El Nino year. If I had 10 bucks for every time the GFS predicted we were going to have unusually cool weather here this spring and summer, I could have paid off the mortgage by now.


I'm not defending the prognostication because it does not yet exist, hence the call to action in my post, "get to steppin'."

Middle south, to me, is the TN Valley of N. Alabama up through southern edge of MO on the west edge and over to the mountains in KY on the east, going up about half way. Or to use an official climate term, the southern part of the "Ohio valley" plus the northern edge of the "South East" and the inclusion of the northern edge of MS, all of AR and the bottom of MO.

An early frost happened (not freeze) in N. Alabama in 2009 (or maybe 2010) with a surge back to warm shortly after.

A headache for me, but a loss for others.

So, if a model, or any reasonable forecast in a few weeks, shows widespread threat of frost for the east coast and or greater south east, it should be socialized early and often.

It would also help, if true, to explain weather deviations during strong to moderate El Nino patterns. I'm for anything that can provide conclusive links that the average Joe can understand, outside of weather and climate geek circles.

Chances are it'll still be nice and warm
Member Since: June 25, 2015 Posts: 0 Comments: 313
367. hydrus
3:15 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 354. Neapolitan:

Can you please share with us the part in the Constitution that encourages members of the Legislative branch to directly interact with foreign dignitaries in an official capacity to undermine the Executive branch? Having trouble finding that part. Oh, also the place in any history book ever written that outlines how ignoring solid scientific facts actually changes those facts? TIA...
Book title is " How to manipulate the Constitution" by Greed.E.Pigg.
Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 27836
366. ricderr
3:15 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
San Fernando Valley is 3-4° Hotter than these temps....


saw that this morning....another hot week for you
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 688 Comments: 23995
365. PedleyCA
3:13 PM GMT on September 08, 2015

San Fernando Valley is 3-4° Hotter than these temps....
Member Since: February 29, 2012 Posts: 0 Comments: 8237
364. sar2401
3:09 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 360. Skyepony:

Some of the models on this low has pulled this together shortly after landfall better than at any point over water. I wouldn't count out those 50kt winds yet;)


Generally, an actual forecast does better than a model.

Today Scattered showers before noon, then scattered showers and thunderstorms between noon and 3pm, then showers likely and possibly a thunderstorm after 3pm. Cloudy, with a high near 86. East wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 60%.

Tonight Scattered showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 70. Southeast wind around 5 mph. Chance of precipitation is 40%.

Wednesday A 40 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a high near 90. Southwest wind 5 to 10 mph.

Wednesday Night A 20 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms. Mostly cloudy, with a low around 72. Southwest wind around 5 mph becoming calm in the evening.

Thursday A 50 percent chance of showers and thunderstorms, mainly after 1pm. Partly sunny, with a high near 90. Calm wind becoming west around 5 mph in the morning.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 25746
363. Llamaluvr
3:07 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 306. StormTrackerScott:

Michael Ventrice %u200F@MJVentrice 18h18 hours ago
State of the Climate in 2014 "17:18 warmest years occurred since 1997" We are now in a stronger than the 97' El Nino


This is on heck of an El-Nino beginning to emerge. 8C anomalies are now growing beneath Nino 3.4 & Nino 3. This all means that the El-Nino pattern across the US is about to take hold now that we are about to enter Fall in 2 weeks. Models are all over this too with a major shot of cold air coming south in the day 10 to 14 range with lows in the 30's pretty far south>

Hi Scott. I'm in West Palm Beach. Do you see any potential for snowfall here?
Member Since: July 8, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 466
362. BayFog
3:06 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 286. brandyn:

Linda is rapidly intensifying again. The latest NAM model run is moving the storm even further to the right. This would bring heavy rain to Baja



Impressive for now, but as soon as it hits that magic SST barrier just south of Point Eugenia (the cape that juts out midway up the peninsula), it will shred, top flying away and eddy drifting and fading out to sea, as per the usual.

The unusual will only occur if one of these coastal hurricanes phases with a properly-oriented early season front off the California coast. Hasn't happened in our lifetimes. May have happened back in the 19th century.
Member Since: July 30, 2013 Posts: 0 Comments: 1771
361. sar2401
3:04 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 355. scott39:

00Z EURO shows a TC in the Western GOM.
Yes, it has for several days now. It keeps moving the low further out in time with each run, and it becomes much less convincing if you go back in time through the model and try to figure out where this low came from. It's not out of the question, but I'll find it more believable when there's a low somewhere that might actually have a chance to get into the BOC.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 25746
360. Skyepony (Mod)
3:03 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Some of the models on this low has pulled this together shortly after landfall better than at any point over water. I wouldn't count out those 50kt winds yet;)

Member Since: August 10, 2005 Posts: 404 Comments: 43526
359. LostTomorrows
3:01 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
92L's location, circumstances and potential track have eerie similarities to Hurricane Juan.

I have family in NS, I hope that Atlantic Canada is monitoring this potential threat.
Member Since: August 26, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 767
358. FOREX
3:01 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 355. scott39:

00Z EURO shows a TC in the Western GOM.
Big Cat breathing heavily.
Member Since: August 17, 2011 Posts: 0 Comments: 3198
357. CaribBoy
2:59 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Only 36% of the average rainfall was recorded in August...

But some islands to our south (except Dominica) were luckier with near to above normal rainfall thanks to Erika, Danny, and the few tropical waves that passed through.

Member Since: October 6, 2007 Posts: 0 Comments: 7986
356. sar2401
2:56 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 339. ariot:

Seriously though, if the El Nino burst causes early frosts back East, peeps with temperature models and later on, forecasts, need to get to steppin'.

The last early frost I recall in the middle south (when living there) was mid October of 2009.

People south of the Mason-Dixon aren't ready for that at the end of September or early October, unless they are mountain people who are pretty much ready for whatever, I'm told :-P

(I'm talking about #306 and the 8C swing that could turn up the weather volume)
Define "middle South". The record early frost in Montgomery AL was October 20, 1989. It was probably seven or eight days later in Eufaula, but we don't have records going back very far. 1989 was the end of a strong La Nina year, getting ready to transition to a neutral year. El Nino is given far too much credit for individual extreme events. The only thing that can be said with certainty is that a strong el Nino usually causes slightly below average winter temperatures and about 10% above average rainfall in the deep South. Not one earliest freeze in Alabama occured in even a moderate El Nino year. If I had 10 bucks for every time the GFS predicted we were going to have unusually cool weather here this spring and summer, I could have paid off the mortgage by now.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 25746
355. scott39
2:55 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
00Z EURO shows a TC in the Western GOM.
Member Since: June 13, 2009 Posts: 0 Comments: 7211
354. Neapolitan
2:54 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 350. canyonboy:



It's that pesky Constitution:

The President... shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur....

ARTICLE II, SECTION 2, CLAUSE 2

Can you please share with us the part in the Constitution that encourages members of the Legislative branch to directly interact with foreign dignitaries in an official capacity to undermine the Executive branch? Having trouble finding that part. Oh, also the place in any history book ever written that outlines how ignoring solid scientific facts actually changes those facts? TIA...
Member Since: November 8, 2009 Posts: 4 Comments: 15163
352. win1gamegiantsplease
2:53 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
105 kt Linda now
Member Since: October 17, 2013 Posts: 1 Comments: 3397
351. hurricanes2018
2:50 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Member Since: March 12, 2013 Posts: 161 Comments: 134370
350. canyonboy
2:47 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 309. Patrap:

Lets take a moment to let this one sink in some.

GOP to attack climate pact at home and abroad
An aide to Mitch McConnell has been informing foreign embassies about GOP plans to oppose Obama's strategy on global warming.
By Andrew Restuccia
09/07/15, 09:30 AM EDT



It's that pesky Constitution:

The President... shall have Power, by and with the Advice and Consent of the Senate, to make Treaties, provided two thirds of the Senators present concur....

ARTICLE II, SECTION 2, CLAUSE 2
Member Since: December 19, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 151
348. ricderr
2:47 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
This will probably afford another 10 days of sunsets like we had last night.. Sun showing off to the west with rainbows to the east..


ahhh...that is nice....here's an el paso sunset...notice we have the "beach"....just no ocean....LOL



forget it.........pic won't load
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 688 Comments: 23995
347. Bucsboltsfan
2:46 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 344. sar2401:

Ah, well then, any time between Saturday and now, I guess. It looks like the intense low is about ready to come ashore near Apalachicola. Lawn furniture may be in danger over the next couple of hours. Still waiting for the moderate drizzle to reach me. The first batch went right on by without a drop. At least it's only 78, so that's one good thing the semi-sub-post tropical low has provided.


Lol, I forgot today was Tuesday so it might have been Sunday was the day we were supposed to get slammed. Stay safe up there!
Member Since: May 9, 2015 Posts: 0 Comments: 1315
345. NSB207
2:43 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Seems like this is latest three month outlook.

http://www.cpc.ncep.noaa.gov
Member Since: August 17, 2010 Posts: 0 Comments: 91
344. sar2401
2:42 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 336. Bucsboltsfan:



Sar, you're wrong about those 50 knot winds yesterday - it was Saturday:).
Ah, well then, any time between Saturday and now, I guess. It looks like the intense low is about ready to come ashore near Apalachicola. Lawn furniture may be in danger over the next couple of hours. Still waiting for the moderate drizzle to reach me. The first batch went right on by without a drop. At least it's only 78, so that's one good thing the semi-sub-post tropical low has provided.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 25746
343. JNFlori30A
2:39 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 317. ricderr:

here in the borderland......after above average temps for what seems forever......we have the opportunity to drop to the mid 80's this week.......rain chances still above average......thanks to linda's moisture heading our way this could be a wet week......local forecasters and the cpc both agree we could see as much as an inch




This will probably afford another 10 days of sunsets like we had last night.. Sun showing off to the west with rainbows to the east..

Member Since: July 14, 2014 Posts: 0 Comments: 718
342. hydrus
2:38 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Little early for a blizzard..



Member Since: September 27, 2007 Posts: 1 Comments: 27836
341. win1gamegiantsplease
2:33 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 339. ariot:

Seriously though, if the El Nino burst causes early frosts back East, peeps with temperature models and later on, forecasts, need to get to steppin'.

The last early frost I recall in the middle south (when living there) was mid October of 2009.

People south of the Mason-Dixon aren't ready for that at the end of September or early October, unless they are mountain people who are pretty much ready for whatever, I'm told :-P

(I'm talking about #306 and the 8C swing that could turn up the weather volume)


I'm ready for that weather anytime anywhere.
Member Since: October 17, 2013 Posts: 1 Comments: 3397
340. sporteguy03
2:31 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 335. georgevandenberghe:



30s Celsius

Next question?


He was talking low temperatures don't be silly, lol.
Member Since: July 7, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 5815
339. ariot
2:28 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Seriously though, if the El Nino burst causes early frosts back East, peeps with temperature models and later on, forecasts, need to get to steppin'.

The last early frost I recall in the middle south (when living there) was mid October of 2009.

People south of the Mason-Dixon aren't ready for that at the end of September or early October, unless they are mountain people who are pretty much ready for whatever, I'm told :-P

(I'm talking about #306 and the 8C swing that could turn up the weather volume)
Member Since: June 25, 2015 Posts: 0 Comments: 313
338. sporteguy03
2:28 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 332. sar2401:

Florida is not going to be anywhere near the 30's in the coming week, any more than Florida was hit by an intense low and 50 knot winds yesterday. Sometimes hyperbole is just that.

I agree Sar. I even checked Atlanta and Nashville depending on how far "South" and see lows still in the low 60s in those areas. I have no idea where a massive cool down will occur anytime soon from what I see.
Member Since: July 7, 2005 Posts: 0 Comments: 5815
337. georgevandenberghe
2:27 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 334. fmbill:





Certainly looks like an El Nino winter is in store for Florida. In fact, below normal temperatures and above average precip is forecast all the way through April.


Yeah this is the classic strong El Nino signature.

It is also a forecast, not a certainty although I believe it.
Member Since: February 1, 2012 Posts: 19 Comments: 4977
336. Bucsboltsfan
2:27 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 332. sar2401:

Florida is not going to be anywhere near the 30's in the coming week, any more than Florida was hit by an intense low and 50 knot winds yesterday. Sometimes hyperbole is just that.


Sar, you're wrong about those 50 knot winds yesterday - it was Saturday:).
Member Since: May 9, 2015 Posts: 0 Comments: 1315
335. georgevandenberghe
2:26 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 324. sporteguy03:


I don't see how Florida will be in the 30s in September.


30s Celsius

Next question?
Member Since: February 1, 2012 Posts: 19 Comments: 4977
334. fmbill
2:23 PM GMT on September 08, 2015




Certainly looks like an El Nino winter is in store for Florida. In fact, below normal temperatures and above average precip is forecast all the way through April.
Member Since: May 27, 2008 Posts: 0 Comments: 861
333. sar2401
2:17 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 326. weathermanwannabe:



Here it is with the mini-rain bands still coming ashore...................... :)
Southeast sector loop


The mini-rainbands are still pretty mini up here. If this keeps up, though, it's possible I could see some moderate drizzle in the next hour or two. I'm going to find my canoe oars now, just in case.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 25746
332. sar2401
2:15 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 324. sporteguy03:


I don't see how Florida will be in the 30s in September.
Florida is not going to be anywhere near the 30's in the coming week, any more than Florida was hit by an intense low and 50 knot winds yesterday. Sometimes hyperbole is just that.
Member Since: October 2, 2004 Posts: 0 Comments: 25746
331. barbamz
2:07 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Some dusty morning greetings (massive storm!):
Middle East dust storm puts dozens in hospital
BBC, 35 minutes ago
Member Since: October 25, 2008 Posts: 91 Comments: 10239
330. win1gamegiantsplease
2:00 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Quoting 298. MAweatherboy1:

Yeah, Linda's not 80kts... May warrant a special advisory, although that's uncommon in the East Pac.




95-100 kt by the looks of it.
Member Since: October 17, 2013 Posts: 1 Comments: 3397
329. ricderr
1:55 PM GMT on September 08, 2015
Lol.............We got in late last night and I saw that on the local doppler this morning; another "ghost" tropical storm making landfall in the Big Bend this am (the remnants of Ericka did the same thing last weekend).....

those are the perfect storms...they look good on radar and cause no damage
Member Since: June 27, 2006 Posts: 688 Comments: 23995

Viewing: 379 - 329

Page: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8Blog Index

Top of Page
Ad Blocker Enabled

Dr. Jeff Masters' WunderBlog

About

Dr. Masters co-founded wunderground in 1995. He flew with the NOAA Hurricane Hunters 1986-1990. Co-blogging with him: Bob Henson, @bhensonweather

Local Weather

Mostly Cloudy
72 °F
Mostly Cloudy

JeffMasters's Recent Photos

Pictured Rocks dunes and clouds
Grizzlies in Lake Clark National Park
Mount Redoubt Lava Dome
Matanuska Glacier