silhouette IV drip

Letters to the editor, The Vancouver Sun

Dear Editors,

An opinion piece questioning the benefits of IV vitamin therapy boldly asserts that “there is no trial that justifies the benefit of IV over simply ingesting a pill.”  This simply isn’t so.  Worse, the implication is that there is no science to support IV therapy.  The depth of this research is substantial.

The CMAJ, in a 2006 study on the efficacy if IV vitamin C noted that “we found 3 well-documented cases of advanced cancers, confirmed by histopathologic review, where patients had unexpectedly long survival times after receiving high-dose intravenous vitamin C therapy.”

The NIH reports that high-dose vitamin C has been studied as a treatment for patients with cancer since the 1970s.  Further, they report that laboratory studies have shown that high doses of vitamin C may slow the growth and spread of prostate, pancreatic, liver, colon, and other types of cancer cells.  Most importantly, intravenous high-dose ascorbic acid has caused very few side effects in clinical trials.

In my clinic, I provide patients with extensive information on clinical efficacy of IV therapies.  For vitamin C, I have citations from over 42 published studies on its safety and efficacy, including JAMA, BMJ, Annals of Internal Medicine, and many other peer-reviewed publications.  All of the research I have collated specifically shows the serum concentrations and pharmacological effect of vitamins administered IV versus orally.

It staggers the mind that two professors, supposedly experts in medical research, can turn a blind eye to the substance of an issue by replacing opinion for peer reviewed science.

Sincerely,

Victor Chan

Victor Chan, BSc, MBA, ND

BCNA President

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