Open Thinkers

Maxigas

Maxigas

Researcher, Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (Spain)

Maxigas studied literature, films and philosophy before becoming a social scientist in Science and Technology Studies. He learnt life as an avantgarde troublemaker, media activist, radical sysadmin and connoisseur of cyberculture. He is currently investigating the unfinished artifacts and architectures of hackerspaces as a Phd candidate at the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3) within the Universitat Oberta de Catalunya (UOC), and on a quest to build a biological computer in the biolab of Calafou.

Read Maxigas’ contribution: Use the Open Source, Luke!

Allison Randal

Allison Randal

Software developer and author (USA)

Allison Randal is a software developer and open source strategist. She is a board member of the Perl Foundation, emeritus board member of the Python Software Foundation, co-founder of the FLOSS Foundations group for open source leaders, and founder and president of Onyx Neon Press. She collaborates in the Debian, Ubuntu, Python, Perl, and OpenStack projects. She currently works on OpenStack at Hewlett-Packard.

Watch Randal’s contribution: Where chaos and innovation meet

Jean Lievens

Jean Lievens

Curator, the Foundation for Peer-to-Peer Alternatives (Belgium)

Graduated in commercial engineering at the Free University of Brussels (VUB), Lievens is currently responsible for the internal communication and coordination of the commercial and real estate department of the City of Brussels. Within the P2P Foundation, he acts as a curator, specially related to the development of peer-to-peer dynamics in the field of politics, economics and institutions, and he also contributes translating articles on P2P. Lievens is co-author, along with Michel Bauwens, of De Wereld Redden, a book on the possibilities of peer-to-peer approaches for a post-capitalist society. As an activist with a liberal/social democratic and Marxist background, he is particularly interested in the development of peer-to-peer dynamics as an emancipatory force.

Read Lievens’ contribution: Before we change the light bulb we need to produce a better one

Francesca Ciceri

Francesca Ciceri

Debian user, developer and translator (Italy)

Francesca is a graduated in Social Sciences from University of Pisa. She started contributing to Debian in late 2010 with the intention of giving something back to this free and cooperatively-build OS. Currently she contributes to the Italian translation team and the Debian Contributors project. She also regularly writes for the Bits from Debian blog. When she is not working on Debian, she is usually translating for Global Voices and Organization for Transformative Work, making plans for the zombie apocalypse, trying her hand at various DIY activities, listening Hard Bop jazz or reading fan fictions.

Watch Ciceri’s contribution: Strive for excellence on collaborative work in debian

Jakob Rigi

Jakob Rigi

Associate professor, Central European University (Hungary)

Dr. Rigi earned his PhD in Social Anthropology in 1999 at the University of London. Currently, he is associate professor at the Department of Sociology and Social Anthropology of the Central European University, in Budapest. His research revolves around five major areas: sovereignty, market, globalisation, social stratification, and the works developed by Karl Marx and Michel Foucault. Throughout his career, Rigi has published on a varied range of topics, from citizenship and nationalism to neo-liberalism, consumption, migration, cultural flows and sex work, among many others.

Read Rigi’s contribution: My view on peer production

Ana Isabel Carvalho

Ana Isabel Carvalho

Designer and co-editor, Libre Graphics magazine (Portugal)

Carvalho graduated in Communication Design at Fine Arts Faculty of Porto University, same faculty where she later got a master’s degree in Image Design. In 2010 she started, together with Ricardo Lafuente, Manufactura Independente, a Porto-based design and research studio focused on exploring libre software and free culture. In the same year the studio collaborated with ginger coons to create Libre Graphics magazine, a print publication on art, design and culture exclusively produced with free software and released under a Creative Commons CC by-SA license. Carvalho’s interests range from hacking typefaces to interface design and data visualization.

Watch Carvalho’s contribution: Free software and publishing: the case of Libre Graphics magazine

Johan Söderberg

Johan Söderberg

Researcher, Laboratoire Techniques, Territoires et Sociétés and Institut Francilien Recherche Innovation Société (France)

With a PhD on the theory of free software and open hardware by the University of Göteborg (Sweden), Söderberg is currently a post-doc researcher at Laboratoire Techniques, Territoires et Sociétés (LATTS) and Institut Francilien Recherche Innovation Société (IFRIS) in Paris (France). His research revolves around what kinds of political subjects are emerging from conflicts surrounding new technology, so his studies are placed in the intersection between science and technology, movement research and innovation.

Read Söderberg’s contribution: The end of Now: peer production or anthropocene?

Joan Subirats

Joan Subirats

Professor, Autonomous University of Barcelona (Spain)

Dr Subirats has a background in economics and is currently a professor of Political Science and researcher and Director of the PhD Program of the Institute of Government and Public Policy at the Autonomous University of Barcelona. His research fields include policy analysis, democratic innovation, public participation and local and regional government. He has published many books including Jóvenes, Internet y política, Decisiones públicas, Otra sociedad, ¿otra política?, Políticas urbanas en España (ed) and Análisis y gestión de políticas públicas, among many others.

Read Subirats’ contribution: Collaborative production and new value metrics

Eduard Aibar

Eduard Aibar

Associate professor and researcher, Open University of Catalonia – Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (Spain)

Eduard Aibar earned his PhD in philosophy at the University of Barcelona and he is currently teaching Science and Technology studies and research design at the UOC’s Department of Arts and Humanities. He is also member of the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3), where he leads the Open Science and Innovation Research Group; and lecturer in the Information and Knowledge Society Doctoral Programme, both within UOC. Aibar’s research interests focuses on the phenomena of peer production, the analysis of resistance and activist initiatives in the context of the Internet and the role of scientific-technical expertise in public controversies. He is also a specialist in the interaction between Wikipedia and the academic world.

Read Aibar’s contributions: Is science compatible with peer production? and A year of thoughts on peer production

Ignasi Clos

Ignasi Clos

Partner and open innovation consultant at Induct Software AS (Spain)

Ignasi Clos holds a degree in Business and International Marketing. He is partner of the Induct Software group in its office in Barcelona, where he coordinates the open innovation projects division. He is currently leading multiple initiatives within the public and private sectors, all related to innovation management. In addition, Clos is also teaching innovation and entrepreneurship at the Pompeu Fabra University. Some of his previous positions include being an international strategy consultant for ACC1Ă“, and a strategy and operations consultant for Deloitte.

Watch Clos’ contribution: New urban spaces and the power of the crowd

Greg Newby

Greg Newby

Director and CEO of the Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation

Since 2000, Dr. Newby is the director and CEO of the Project Gutenberg Literary Archive Foundation (PGLAF), a volunteer-based organization that has been digitizing and archiving cultural works since its foundation in 1971. Currently, it offers over 45.000 free ebooks in different languages and formats. With a PhD in Information Transfer and an MBA in Sustainable Systems, he is also manager of the Supercomputing Core Laboratory at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (Saudi Arabia). Previously, he was director of the Arctic Region Supercomputing Center at the University of Alaska Fairbanks (USA). Newby defines himself as a “strategic thinker with passion for enabling diverse scientific, social and educational opportunities for all people. Devoted to the expansion of human intellect and capability through use of computation and information technologies”.

Read Newby’s contribution: Union is strength, but not necessarily success

Joan Ras

Joan Ras

Partner and director of the Induct Software division in Barcelona (Spain)

Joan Ras is an economist with a MSc in Applied Economics by the Pompeu Fabra University. Since 2013, he is responsible for the office in Barcelona of the Induct Software group, a Norwegian company specialised in offering solutions to increase innovation capability among organisations. Ras is also professor of innovation and entrepreneurship at the ESCI School (Pompeu Fabra University). During more than 15 years, he has been strategy and operations consultant, especially within the education, health and public sectors.

Watch Ras’ contribution: Bringing open innovation into organisations

Pep Adrian

Pep Adrian

Wikipedian in residence, UOC (Spain)

Pep Adrian is an industrial engineer, a Wikipedia editor since 2007, and a member of Amical Wikimedia, a non-profit organisation that promotes Wikipedia and related projects in Catalonia. Since May 2014, he is the Wikipedian in residence of the Open University of Catalonia (UOC). This position means that Adrian will act as a bridge between the university and the Wikipedia community to identify all the UOC’s open-access resources to reuse them in the encyclopedia articles. In this sense, UOC has become the first European university to incorporate such a figure.

Read Adrian’s contribution: Reliability vs verifiability on Wikipedia, the peer production encyclopedia

Yochai Benkler

Yochai Benkler

Professor, Harvard Law School; and faculty co-director, Berkman Center for Internet and Society (USA)

Yochai Benkler is the Berkman Professor of Entrepreneurial Legal Studies at Harvard Law School, and faculty co-director of the Berkman Center for Internet and Society at Harvard University. Since the 1990s he has worked in characterizing the role of information commons and decentralized collaboration to innovation, information production, and freedom in the networked economy and society. His books include The Wealth of Networks: How social production transforms markets and freedom and The Penguin and the Leviathan: How Cooperation Triumphs over Self-Interest. Benkler has advised governments and international organizations on innovation policy and telecommunications, and serves on the boards or advisory boards of several nonprofits engaged in working towards an open society.

Read Benkler’s contribution: Peer production and the opportunities and struggles of constructing a more humane production system

Alberto Abella

Alberto Abella

Assistant professor, Universidad Rey Juan Carlos; and president, OKFN Spain

Alberto Abella is a Telecommunications engineer and is currently doing his PhD in economics focused on the economic impact of open data and open government in smart cities. Abella is also co-ordinator of the interoperability group of smart cities at the Spanish Association of Electronics, Information and Communications Technologies, Telecommunications and Digital Content companies (AMETIC). Currently, he is assistant professor at URJC and works for the European project apps4europe. He is also president of the Open Knowledge Foundation (OKFN) chapter in Spain, author of MELODA, a methodology for assessing how reusable is a dataset, and co-author of the three editions of the book White paper of Free Software in Spain.

Read Abella’s contribution: How many peers will it take to change the bulb in a smart city?

Derrick de Kerckhove

Derrick de Kerckhove

Professor, UniversitĂ  degli Studi di Napoli Federico II (Italy), and IN3 visiting professor

Derrick de Kerckhove holds a PhD in French Language and Literature from the University of Toronto (Canada), where he is retired professor, and a PhD in Sociology of Art from the University of Tours (France). He is now professor at the School of Sociology at the University of Naples, and visiting professor at IN3, where he is member of the Medi@ccions #Digital Culture research group. From 1993 to 2008, De Kerckhove was the director of the McLuhan Program in Culture and Technology. He is author of several books, including Brainframes: Technology, Mind and Business, The Skin of Culture, and Connected Intelligence. Recently, De Kerckhove has co-edited, together with Cristina Miranda de Almeida, The Point of Being.

Watch De Kerckhove’s contribution: Collective intelligence vs connected intelligence

Don Tapscott

Don Tapscott

Innovative thinker, writer, lecturer, CEO at The Tapscott Group (Canada)

Don Tapscott is one of the world’s leading authorities on innovation, media, and the economic and social impact of technology and advises business and government leaders around the world. In 2013, Thinkers50 ranked him fourth among the world’s most influential management thinkers and was awarded the Global Solutions Award for launching and leading the Global Solution Networks program based at the Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto. He has authored or co-authored 15 widely read books including the 1992 best seller Paradigm Shift. His 1995 hit The Digital Economy changed thinking around the world about the transformational nature of the Internet and two years later he defined the Net Generation and the “digital divide” in Growing Up Digital. His 2000 work, Digital Capital, introduced seminal ideas like “the business web” and was described by BusinessWeek as “pure enlightenment.” Wikinomics: How Mass Collaboration Changes Everything was the best selling management book in 2007 and translated into over 25 languages. Over 30 years he has introduced many ground-breaking concepts that are part of contemporary understanding. His work continues as CEO of The Tapscott Group, a member of World Economic Forum, Chancellor of Trent University, Adjunct Professor of Management for the Rotman School of Management at the University of Toronto and Martin Prosperity Institute Fellow. His most recent book, published in October 2014, is The Digital Economy: 20th Anniversary Edition (“The Digital Economy” is Don’s seminal work, which changed thinking around the world about the transformational nature of the Internet). With 12 new mini chapters in addition to the original text, the book seeks to help its readers better understand the next stage of the digital economy.

Read Tapscott’s contribution: An example of how Internet allows us to collaborate in amazingly new ways

Jim Zemlin

Jim Zemlin

Executive director, the Linux Foundation (USA)

As executive director of The Linux Foundation, Zemlin uses his experience on mobile computing, cloud computing and open source software to accelerate innovation in technology through the use of open source and Linux. Within the foundation, he works with the world’s largest technology companies, including IBM, Intel, Google, Samsung, Qualcomm, and others to help define the future of computing on the server, in the cloud and on a variety of new mobile computing devices. His work at the vendor-neutral Linux Foundation gives him a unique and aggregate perspective on the global technology industry. He also advises a variety of startups and sits on the boards of the Global Economic Symposium, Open Source For America and Chinese Open Source Promotion Union.

Read Zemlin’s contribution: Lessons from Linux: the future is collaboration

David Cuartielles

David Cuartielles

Arduino co-founder and teacher at Malmö University (Sweden)

David Cuartielles holds an MsC in telecommunications engineering. Currently, he teaches interactive technologies at Malmö University’s School of Arts and Communication, where he also leads the Prototyping Laboratory. He is also a researcher at the Internet of Things and People group (IoTaP), and he is writing his PhD in prototyping tools for education. Cuartielles is also one of the co-founders of Arduino, an open-source electronics platform based on easy-to-use hardware and software. It is globally used by anyone interested in developing interactive projects. Among other duties, he supervises Arduino’s web structure.

Read Cuartielles’ contribution: A ten-step guide to approach the light bulb challenge

Peter Troxler

Peter Troxler

Research Professor at Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences and owner of Square One (Netherlands)

Peter Troxler is research professor for the revolution in manufacturing at Rotterdam University of Applied Sciences and owner of Square One, an independent research company at the intersection of business administration, society and technology. Currently, he focuses into investigating and developing business models of open source anything — design, hardware, inventions — and the corresponding formats and ecologies of innovation and co-creation. Troxler holds a PhD in Management, Technology and Economics from ETH Zurich and a certificate in International Copyright Law from the University of Amsterdam. Apart from his business and academic assignments he has also helped to initiate several interdisciplinary and artistic projects.

Read Troxler’s contribution: Benevolent Dictators, Killer Apps and Peer-to-Peer: A True Match?

Geoffrey Moore

Geoffrey Moore

Author, speaker and advisor (USA)

Geoffrey Moore is a well known author, speaker and advisor who splits his consulting time between start-up companies and established high-tech enterprises. Moore’s life’s work has focused on the market dynamics surrounding disruptive innovations. His first book, Crossing the Chasm, focuses on the challenges start-up companies face transitioning from early-adopting to mainstream customers. It has sold more than a million copies, and its third edition has been revised such that the majority of its examples and case studies reference companies come to prominence from the past decade. Moore’s most recent work, Escape Velocity, addresses the challenge large enterprises face when they seek to add a new line of business to their established portfolio. He has helped found The Chasm Group, Chasm Institute and TCG Advisors, and currently he is chairman emeritus of all three.

Read Moore’s contribution: How many peers does it take to light the world?

George Dafermos

George Dafermos

Research coordinator, FLOK Society; and research associate, P2P Foundation (Greece)

Dafermos holds a PhD from Delft University of Technology and is a researcher of technology policy and management, focusing on the governance of the Commons and peer production. He is the research coordinator of the FLOK Society project in the areas of biodiversity, open-sustainable agriculture, distributed manufacturing and distributed energy. He is also a research associate of the P2P Foundation and a member of the organization team of the Festival of the Commons.

Read Dafermos’ contribution: Towards a peer society based on the commons

Laura Forlano

Laura Forlano

Assistant professor, Institute of Design, Illinois Institute of Technology (USA)

Laura Forlano is an Assistant Professor of Design at the Institute of Design and Affiliated Faculty in the College of Architecture at Illinois Institute of Technology where she is co-director of the Critical Futures Lab. Her research is focused on the intersection between emerging technologies, material practices and the future of cities. Specifically, she writes about emergent forms of organizing and urbanism enabled by mobile, wireless and ubiquitous computing technologies with an emphasis on the socio-technical practices and spaces of innovation. One of Forlano’s projects, “Designing Policy,” is focused on the use of urban technology for citizen engagement. Another project, called “Design Collaborations as Sociotechnical Systems” and funded by the National Science Foundation, is an international comparative study that focuses on the role of technology in supporting networks of designers in New York, Barcelona and Brisbane. She is co-editor of From Social Butterfly to Engaged Citizen (MIT Press, 2011).

Read Forlano’s contribution: How many networked light bulbs does it take to change a light bulb?

Joe Brockmeier

Joe Brockmeier

Principal cloud & storage analyst, Red Hat (USA)

Joe Brockmeier works on the Open Source and Standards team within Red Hat, a multinational software company that provides open source software to the enterprise community. He is also recovering tech journalist, long-time open source advocate, and a member of the Apache Software Foundation. Brockmeier also works with the Fedora Cloud Working Group and spends most of his time on Project Atomic.

Read Brockmeier’s contribution: Do Something, Even if it’s Wrong

Katherine Maher

Katherine Maher

Chief Communications Officer, Wikimedia Foundation (USA)

Katherine Maher joined the Wikimedia Foundation in April of 2014 as Chief Communications Officer. Her role includes making the story of the Wikimedia movement accessible and relatable, developing strategies that advance its mission and vision, responding to unfolding events, and ensuring the Wikimedia identity remains central in the process. Previously, Maher was Advocacy Director for the international digital rights organization Access in Washington DC, where she worked on global policy issues related to freedom of expression, access to information, and privacy. Nearly all projects she has been involved with are directly related to advancing fundamental rights and open and free societies. Maher is also a fellow at the Truman National Security Project, and her writings on human rights, technology, and foreign policy have appeared in various publications, including State Power 2.0 (Ashgate, 2013).

Read Maher’s contribution: Knowledge should be free

Andy Williamson

Andy Williamson

Consultant, researcher and speaker on digital and social media, society and policy (UK)

Dr Andy Williamson works globally to transform democratic leadership and engagement across parliaments, governments and civil society. Through facilitation, critical thinking, creativity and innovation he finds new ways to engage the public in democracy and helps to transform how organisations think, function and collaborate. A New Zealander based in London (UK), he was Director of Digital Democracy at the Hansard Society before founding Democratise in 2012. Williamson is also a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (RSA); the Chair of Do It UK, and a Governor of the Democracy Society. He holds a PhD in Information Technology from Monash University (Melbourne, Australia) and is a published poet. His last book is From arrogance to intimacy. A handbook for active democracies, written together with Martin Sande.

Read Williamson’s contribution: Shining a new light on democracy

Luis Ivan Cuende

Luis Iván Cuende

Hacker, co-founder of Stampery (Spain)

Born in 1995, Luis Iván Cuende is a young Spanish entrepreneur — he started when he was just 14 — who defines himself as a hacker, a crypto-anarchist, a free culture lover and a music addict. He founded Asturix, Holalabs and Cardwee, and more recently Stampery, a company that provides a secure and decentralized proof of existence, ownership and integrity for legal uses, creative or anything you could think about. Cuende is also a former advisor to the Vice-President of the European Commission, and author of the book Tengo 18 años y ni estudio ni trabajo: ¡monto empresas y vivo haciendo lo que me gusta! (I’m 18 years old and I don’t study nor work: I create companies and live doing what I like!).

Read Cuende’s contribution: How Bitcoin can decentralize society

Dale Dougherty

Dale Dougherty

Founder of Make: magazine and creator of Maker Faire (USA)

Dale Dougherty is the founder and President/CEO of Maker Media, the company behind Make: magazine — which brings the do-it-yourself mindset to everyday technology — and Maker Faire — which leads a growing maker movement in San Francisco, New York and Detroit. Make: began at O’Reilly Media, where Dougherty was co-founder and the first editor of their computing trade books. As a part of his work, Dougherty also forges strategic partnerships in support of maker education, and global, cultural, and economic initiatives. Previously, he was the developer of Global Network Navigator (GNN), the first commercial website, launched in 1993 and sold to AOL in 1995. He also coined the term “Web 2.0” and he is co-author of Sed & Awk.

Watch Dougherty’s contribution: The recipe for additive innovation

Pablos Holman

Pablos Holman

Hacker, futurist and inventor, Intellectual Ventures Lab (USA)

Pablos Holman is a futurist, inventor, and notorious hacker with a unique view into breaking and building new technologies. Currently, he is working for Nathan Myhrvold at the Intellectual Ventures Laboratory where a wide variety of futuristic invention projects are underway including a fission reactor powered by nuclear waste; a machine to suppress hurricanes; a system to reverse global warming; and a device that can shoot mosquitoes out of the sky with lasers to help eradicate malaria. Holman is passionate about invention and design project that assimilate new technologies, making wild ideas a bit more practical and vice versa. He helped create the world’s smallest PC, 3D printers at Makerbot, spaceships with Jeff Bezos and a Wi-Fi seeking robot called the Hackerbot, among many other projects.

Watch Holman’s contribution: Shifting trends on how we work

Jordi Llonch

Jordi Llonch Esteve

Founder and CEO of Sharing Academy (Spain)

An airline pilot for 7 years and with a BA in Multimedia, Jordi Llonch has been an entrepreneur throughout his entire career. In 2007 he developed DA-20 Katana Web Based Training, e-learning software for instructing student pilots. In 2010 he founded the Catalan speaking blog El meu ordinador (My computer) with the aim of helping his fellow classmates to pass the subjects he had already finished. This led him to the idea for Sharing Academy, which he founded in 2014, a peer-to-peer tutoring marketplace for university students within the same school and degree course.

Read Llonch’s contribution: How to survive at university

Albert Cañigueral

Albert Cañigueral

Founder of ConsumoColaborativo and OuiShare Connector in Barcelona (Spain)

Cañigueral is a Spanish Language Connector at OuiShare, an open global community of entrepreneurs, designers, makers, researchers and citizens working to accelerate the shift towards a more collaborative economy. In 2011, he founded ConsumoColaborativo, the main information hub in Spanish about collaborative consumption. Cañigueral brings meaningful strategic innovation based on constant research and writing digested and delivered via customized talks, workshops and seminars to assess the impact of the collaborative economy. He is author of Vivir mejor con menos [Living better with less] (Conecta, 2014).

Read Cañigueral’s contribution: The citizen producer at the epicenter of the P2P revolution

Shannon Dosemagen

Shannon Dosemagen

Co-founder and Executive Director of Public Lab (USA)

With an MS in Anthropology and Nonprofit Management, Shannon Dosemagen is a founder and Executive Director of Public Lab, a community where anyone can learn how to investigate environmental concerns. With 15 years of experience in community organizing and education, she has worked with environment and public health groups across the United States addressing declining freshwater resources, coastal land loss and building participatory monitoring programs with communities neighboring industrial oil facilities and impacted by the BP oil spill. Dosemagen is also an Ashoka Fellow and a Berkman Center Fellow, and serves on advisory boards, councils or committees for the National Parks Conservation Association, Global Community Monitor, the Louisiana Public Health Institute Healthy Communities Coalition and the Citizen Science Association.

Read Dosemagen’s contribution: Open science and the environmental movement

David Bollier

David Bollier

Author, blogger and consultant (USA)

David Bollier is an author, independent scholar-activist of the commons, and blogger at Bollier.org. He is cofounder of the Commons Strategies Group, a project that works to promote the commons internationally. He is also the author of Think Like a Commoner: A Short Introduction to the Commons and Patterns of Commoning, among other books. Bollier has worked with American TV writer/producer Normal Lear on a variety of non-television, public affairs projects. He has also been Senior Fellow at the Norman Lear Center at the USC Annenberg School for Communication and co-founder and board member (2001-2011) of Public Knowledge, a Washington policy advocacy organization dedicated to protecting the information commons.

Read Bollier’s contribution: The Shift from Open Platforms to Digital Commons

Robin Chase

Robin Chase

Author of Peers Inc, co-founder and former CEO of Zipcar

Robin Chase is a transportation entrepreneur and author of Peers Inc, a book about how new companies are unlocking the power of the collaborative economy. She is co-founder and former CEO of Zipcar, the largest carsharing company in the world; Buzzcar, a peer to peer carsharing service in France (now merged with Drivy); and GoLoco, an online ridesharing community. She is also co-founder and Executive Chairman of Veniam, a vehicle communications company building the networking fabric for the Internet of Moving Things. Chase has received many awards in the areas of innovation, design, and environment, including Time 100 Most Influential People, and BusinessWeek Top 10 Designers. She graduated from Wellesley College and MIT’s Sloan School of Management, and received an honorary Doctorate of Design from the Illinois Institute of Technology.

Read Chases’s contribution: Dividing the Wealth – Do peer networks like Airbnb distribute value fairly?

Marcin Jakubowski

Marcin Jakubowski

Founder and executive director, Open Source Ecology (USA)

Dr. Jakubowski is the founder of Open Source Ecology, an open collaborative company of engineers, producers, and builders developing the Global Village Construction Set (GVCS): a set of 50 most important machines that it takes for modern life to exist. Its mission is to create a collaborative economic platform that optimizes development, production, and distribution via open source collaboration to accelerate innovation to unprecedented levels. Jakubowski graduated with honors from Princeton University and earned his PhD in fusion physics from the University of Wisconsin. He has been recognized on the Enrich List, and gained the distinctions of a 2012 TED Senior Fellow, a 2013 Shuttleworth Foundation Fellow, and a 2013 White House Champion of Change. The GVCS was recognized in Time Magazine’s Best Inventions of 2012.

Read Jakubowski’s contribution: Open enterprises: towards a new economic pattern

Javier Creus

Javier Creus

Founder of Ideas for Change and Pentagrowth (Spain)

Javier Creus is considered to be one of the primary strategists and thought leaders in the collaborative economy, open and P2P business models, citizen innovation and the networked society in Spain. He is the creator of Pentagrowth, a growth model for organisations, and founder of Ideas for Change, a consultancy company specialised in cultural, social and tech trends. Creus has also been freelance strategic planner, co-founder of Digital Mood incubator and @kubik multidisciplinary space, and services marketing professor at ESADE. He is co-author of We are not ants, advisor at Ouishare and secretary of the Open Knowledge Foundation in Spain.

Watch Creus’ contribution: Providing new sources of trust

Primavera De Filippi

Primavera De Filippi

Researcher, Centre d’Études et de Recherches de Science Administrative, CNRS-Université Paris II (France)

Primavera De Filippi is a researcher at CERSA (CNRS-UniversitĂ© Paris II) and a research fellow at the Berkman Center for Internet & Society, where is investigating the concept of “governance by design” as it relates to online distributed architectures. Most of her research focuses on the legal challenges raised and faced by emergent decentralised technologies made possible through Blockchain-based applications. She holds a PhD from the European University Institute in Florence, where she explored the legal challenges of copyright law in the digital environment. De Filippi is also an administrator of the Communia association for the public domain, a coordinator at the Open Knowledge Foundation, a legal expert for Creative Commons in France, and Chief Innovation Officer at Backfeed.cc.

Read De Filippi’s contribution: Blockchain technology: a new (r)evolution in the digital economy

Mayo Fuster

Mayo Fuster

Researcher, Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (Spain)

Mayo Fuster is a researcher at the Internet Interdisciplinary Institute (IN3-UOC), where she leads the Dimmons research group. She also coordinates the EU-funded project P2PValue within the Institute of Government and Public Policies (IGOP); and she is a faculty associated at the Berkman Center for Internet and Society. Fuster holds a PhD on social and political science from the European University Institute, and her research interests revolve around Internet and politics, social movements, free culture, online communities, peer production and public policies. She is co-author of several books, like Digital commons and free culture, Nothing will be the same: Youth, Internet and Politics in Spain (both in Spanish), and Rethinking political organization in an age of movements and networks; among others. Fuster is also a member of the Research Committee of the Wikimedia Foundation and a board member at the Spanish chapter of the Open Knowledge Foundation.

Read Fuster’s contribution: One white middle-class man

Daniel Lombraña

Daniel Lombraña

Founder and CEO of Scifabric (Spain)

Daniel Lombraña is a computer engineer with a PhD in Parallel Genetic Programming on Volunteer Desktop Grids who, while doing his thesis, found that his real passion was to build tools that could help other people to solve their problems. Nowadays, he focuses on PyBossa, an open source framework for crowdsourcing projects already used by institutions like the British Museum and CERN; and its hosted version Crowdcrafting, which allows volunteers to contribute to scientific projects that cannot be done by machine alone. He centralises all this projects through SciFabric, a company he founded and directs. Lombraña is also a Fellow of the Shuttleworth Foundation, a senior researcher for the Citizen Cyberscience Centre, and a collaborator with the Open Knowledge Foundation.

Read Lombraña’s contribution: Peer power for the advancement of science

Diego Isabel

Diego Isabel

Founder, Global Hub for the Common Good (UK)

Diego Isabel is the founder of the Global Hub for the Common Good, a think tank of people and organisations working towards the co-creation of a new social and economic model at both local and global levels. He is also the coordinator of the international expansion of the Economy for the Common Good. He holds a degree in Environmental and Forest Engineering and an MSc on Global Governance and Ethics from University College London. Isabel defines himself as a social entrepreneur and chage-maker, and he is a specialist in new economics, social and political innovation, sustainable development and business management. Throughout his career, he has worked with private companies, public institutions and governments, and he is author of Yo soy Tú: Propuesta para una Nueva Sociedad and co-author of Dentro de 15 años.

Read Isabel’s contribution: Collaboration is key for changing the light bulb

About the Question
How many peers does it take to change a light bulb?

Systems like Linux and websites like Wikipedia are paradigmatic of a particular way of open collaboration known as peer production. Peer producers choose their tasks freely and coordinate their work using open digital platforms. They share the fruits of their labour as part of a global commons, and everyone works according to their abilities and benefits according to their needs.

Is this an emerging form of communism? Or the future of liberal capitalism? Or is it simply a new mode of production? In this blog we want to explore both the benefits and the downsides of such way of working.

UOC/IN3 degrees