An Artificial Universe, Cosmic Rays, and a Rainbow Unicorn: Lux Recommends #20

By Sam Arbesman

Welcome to Lux Recommends #20, the newest edition of what we at Lux are reading and thinking about (and want to receive this by email? Sign up here).

Articles

Inside the Artificial Universe That Creates Itself: On the procedurally generated game No Man’s Sky. — Sam

How To Kill A Supercomputer: Dirty Power, Cosmic Rays, and Bad Solder: Cosmic rays and other small details that add up to become very big problems for supercomputers. — Sam

As a God Might Be: Review of three books and “Three Visions of Technological Progress.” — Sam

A Rainbow Unicorn Wants to Transform Biology Publishing: Interesting questions on what should peer-review look like in a web-connected scientific community with access to self-publishing tools. Why must peer review only be left to 2–5 reviewers instead of a wider community. — Bilal

A 19-year-old made a free robot lawyer that has appealed $3 million in parking tickets: “But with the help of a robot made by British programmer Joshua Browder, 19, it costs nothing. Browder’s bot handles questions about parking-ticket appeals in the UK. Since launching in late 2015, it has successfully appealed $3 million worth of tickets.” — Sam

The Most Powerful Lesson I’ve Ever Learned In Business: Important decisions at the founder/CEO and Board level shouldn’t be an argument over personal opinions. They can and should be analyzed from first principles: what are the core objectives and what best helps achieve those objectives. — Bilal

5 Steps To Re-create Xerox PARC’s Design Magic (From The Guy Who Helped Make It): Some ingredients for building a successful tech research lab. — Sam

Movies

Dear Zachary: An emotional roller coaster. Highly recommend, but be prepared to cry. If you watch, DO NOT READ SPOILERS OR REVIEWS BEFOREHAND. — Jeff W

Somm: It is awesome and insane the level of knowledge these guys have to learn in order to be a Master Sommelier. — Adam G

Bridge of Spies: Includes some worthy negotiation scenes one can learn from. — Josh

Books

Inventology, by Pagan Kennedy: A phenomenal look at the factors behind invention. Wonderful. — Sam

The Thinking Woman’s Guide to Real Magic, by Emily Croy Barker: I don’t often read fantasy, but when I do, I try my best to make sure it’s really good. This book was great fun. — Sam

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