A Rwanda Defense Force soldier calls in a 9-line report to request a medical evacuation, while Army Sgt. Jonathan Lopez, 1st Battalion, 124th Infantry Regiment medic, observes during a medical exercise Sept. 9, 2016, at the Rwanda Military Academy, Rwanda. The exercise, part of a two-week medical course, tested the RDF soldiers’ abilities to apply techniques of care under fire and other battlefield medical tactics. U.S. Army Soldiers from the 1st Battalion, 124th Infantry Regiment, assigned to Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, instructed the course. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Eric Summers Jr.) Enabling and Strengthening Partners CJTF-HOA assists its East African partners with countering violent extremist organizations in the region to prevent them from threatening U.S. or East African people or interests.

The command strengthens the defense capability, capacity and coordination among its partners to enable them to provide for their own security, combat transnational threats and respond to crises.

Supporting African militaries and regional organizations with training, information sharing, advice and assistance is paramount to our mission. Learn more >

KENYA- Kenya Defense Forces combat engineers practice setting up an electric demolition with mock training aids during Deliberate Kindle 2016, Sept. 16, at a training center in Kenya. U.S. Navy Task Force Sparta explosive ordnance disposal technicians and a dive independent duty corpsman, assigned to Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, provided counter-improvised explosive device, tactical combat medical care, and train-the-trainer skills to approximately 53 KDF soldiers and officers in preparation the KDF’s deployment with the African Union Mission in Somalia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Tiffany DeNault) Shaping Regional Security & Stability CJTF-HOA protects U.S. personnel and facilities, promotes regional stability, and facilitates access and freedom of movement with its strategic posture and presence on the continent.

We work with our East African partners to identify how our unique capabilities can support their efforts to achieve security and stability, as we believe Africans are best able to address African security challenges.

We share an enduring commitment with our partners to securing a safe, stable and prosperous East Africa. Learn more >

U.S. Army Capt. Mike Smith, left, Combined Joint Task Force - Horn of Africa Military Coordination Cell logistics representative, reviews an item list with Capt. Ndikumana, center right, Burundi National Defense Force African Union Mission in Somalia Burundi contingent team leader, in Mogadishu, Somalia, Sept. 12, 2016. Burundi forces received more than 10 power generators, tires and spare parts for Mine Resistant Ambush Protected vehicles to remedy the wear and tear on vehicle parts caused by rough and uneven terrain. The MRAP vehicles are vital to keeping AMISOM forces safe from roadside bombs planted by al-Shabaab throughout Somalia. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Raughton) Forging Relationships CJTF-HOA develops and strengthens joint, interagency, intergovernmental, and multilateral partnerships to address mutual security concerns.

In doing so, we work to enhance cooperation among our East African partners to promote a coordinated regional approach to regional security challenges.

Our approach is a balance between operations and engagements. We engage routinely with senior leaders and counterparts from African militaries to reinforce our strategic relationships and further our shared security goals and objectives. Learn more >

Combined Joint Task Force -- Horn or Africa

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After a day in the air, the Chinook comes down to earth and gets cleaned up by hardworking maintainers. check out the wash in a quick overview of the action!
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U.S. Navy Cmdr. Abuhena Saifulislam, deputy command chaplain for U.S. Africa Command, speaks to Muslim civilian employees during the Friday sermon at Mariama Bin't Imran Mosque in Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Jan. 30, 2017. A native of Bangladesh, Saifulislam became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1995, was commissioned in 1999 as the first Muslim chaplain for the U.S. Marine Corp, and is currently one of only two Imam Chaplains in the U.S. Navy. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Paul Gorman)U.S. Navy Cmdr. Abuhena Saifulislam, deputy command chaplain for U.S. Africa Command, describes his role as a Muslim American Imam in the U.S. military, during a meeting at the Ministry of Islamic Affairs in downtown Djibouti Jan. 30, 2017. A native of Bangladesh, Saifulislam became a naturalized U.S. citizen in 1995, was commissioned in 1999 as the first Muslim chaplain for the U.S. Marine Corp, and is currently one of only two Imam Chaplains in the U.S. Navy. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Paul Gorman)U.S. Navy Cmdr. Abuhena Saifulislam, deputy command chaplain for U.S. Africa Command, describes Muslim life in America to Abdelkader Mohamed Humad, Sultan of Tadjoura during a visit to Tadjoura, Djibouti Jan. 30, 2017. The meeting was part of a week-long temporary duty assignment to Djibouti for exercise Cutlass Express 2017, during which Saifulislam was able to engage with key Muslim leaders and local practitioners of the Islamic faith. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Paul Gorman)The Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa Religious Affairs staff join U.S. Navy Cmdr. Abuhena Saifulislam, deputy command chaplain for U.S. Africa Command, and U.S. Army Sgt. Maj. Chantel Sena-Diaz, senior enlisted leader of religious affairs for USAFRICOM to meet with members of the Ministry of Islamic Affairs in downtown Djibouti Jan. 30, 2017. The meeting was part of a week-long temporary duty assignment to Djibouti for exercise Cutlass Express 2017, during which Saifulislam and Sena-Diaz were able to engage with key Muslim leaders and local practitioners of the Islamic faith. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Master Sgt. Paul Gorman)U.S. Air Force Gen. Tod Wolters, commander of U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa (USAFE-AFAFRICA), walks with Maj. Gen. Kurt Sonntag, commander of Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa, after his arrival at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Feb. 1, 2017. One of the USAFE-AFAFRICA responsibilities is enabling NATO pledged Air Forces and supporting the peace and stability of African states. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Penny Snoozy)U.S. Air Force Gen. Tod Wolters, commander of U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa (USAFE-AFAFRICA), speaks with forward deployed Airmen assigned to the installation, and Combined Joint Task Force-Horn of Africa during his visit to Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Feb. 1, 2017. Wolters discussed the three command priorities: trust, teamwork, and training. Camp Lemonnier is one of USAFE-AFAFRICA’s 114 geographically separated locations. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Penny Snoozy)U.S. Air Force Gen. Tod Wolters, commander of U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa, greets members of the 510th Expeditionary Fighter Squadron at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Feb. 1, 2017. Wolters visited with U.S. Air Force members in Djibouti to gain insight into their integrated missions, and the multiple roles of Airmen in the joint environment. The members assembled nearby their assigned aircraft, an F-16 Fighting Falcon from Aviano Air Base, Italy.U.S. Air Force Gen. Tod Wolters, commander U.S. Air Forces in Europe and Air Forces Africa (USAFE-AFAFRICA), greets members of the 75th Expeditionary Airlift Squadron and U.S. Air Force joint terminal attack controllers at Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Feb. 1, 2017. Wolters visited with U.S. Air Force members in Djibouti to gain insight into the integrated missions and hear about the roles of Airmen in the joint environment. The members assembled nearby their respective aircraft, a C-130J Super Hercules during this portion of the USAFE-AFAFRICA commander’s visit.
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