Guide to the Sun

Front Cover
Cambridge University Press, Mar 30, 1995 - Science - 386 pages
The sun has been an object of fascination and scientific interest to humans since the time of the ancient Greeks. With minimum technical language, this book gives an account of what we now know about the sun's interior, its surface and atmosphere, its role in our solar system, and its relation to other stars. The ways that solar power is being converted to useful forms of energy are also explained. The book is aimed at anyone interested in learning about the latest developments in solar studies, from those at high-school level to the nonspecialist professional.
 

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Contents

II
1
III
6
IV
14
V
16
VI
20
VII
26
VIII
31
IX
33
XXXVIII
157
XXXIX
160
XL
173
XLI
179
XLII
203
XLIII
207
XLIV
218
XLV
221

X
34
XI
38
XII
41
XIII
43
XIV
47
XV
53
XVI
58
XVII
67
XVIII
73
XIX
78
XX
79
XXI
81
XXII
87
XXIII
92
XXIV
97
XXV
99
XXVI
103
XXVII
106
XXVIII
109
XXIX
114
XXX
123
XXXI
127
XXXIII
133
XXXIV
137
XXXV
142
XXXVI
149
XXXVII
150
XLVI
227
XLVII
235
XLVIII
243
XLIX
253
L
257
LI
262
LIII
264
LIV
276
LV
295
LVI
296
LVII
302
LVIII
303
LIX
305
LX
309
LXI
312
LXII
315
LXIII
325
LXIV
334
LXV
342
LXVI
344
LXVII
345
LXIX
348
LXX
355
LXXI
360
LXXII
363
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About the author (1995)

Professor Kenneth Phillips is Scientific Associate at the Natural History Museum in South Kensington, London, and specialises in solar physics and X-ray and ultraviolet spectroscopy. He is co-author of Ultraviolet and X-ray Spectroscopy of the Solar Atmosphere (2008) and has authored over 300 research papers. In 2010, he was awarded the Copernicus Medal of the Polish Academy of Sciences and in 2009, the Gold Medal of the University of Wroclaw, Poland, for collaborative projects with the solar group there. From 2002 to 2005, he held a National Research Council Senior Research Associateship at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center and he worked for twenty-five years in the Space Science Department of the Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Oxfordshire. He has held honorary or visiting professorships at Queen's University, Belfast and University College London.

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