The Women of the 116th Congress

A record number of women were elected to the U.S. House and Senate in the 2018 midterm elections.

By Claire Hansen, ContributorNov. 13, 2018
By Claire Hansen, ContributorNov. 13, 2018, at 12:46 p.m.
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In this Sept. 21, 2018 photo, Pennsylvania congressional candidates, from left, Chrissy Houlahan, Mary Gay Scanlon, state Rep. Madeleine Dean and Susan Wild, take part in a campaign rally in Philadelphia. Each of the Democratic candidates won their elections on Nov. 6 and are set to become the first women from Pennsylvania to serve full terms in Congress since 2014. (AP Photo
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Matt Rourke/AP

2018 was a historic year for women in politics.

Though not all races have been decided, at least 128 women will serve in Congress come January, including non-voting delegates from Washington, D.C., and U.S. territories. There will be at least 23 female senators, matching the number in 2018, according to the Center for American Women and Politics at Rutgers University. The group of women elected to the House of Representatives swelled to more than 100, shattering the record of 85 set in 2016. In total, women will hold at least 23 percent of the seats in Congress, up from 20 percent.


Though congresswomen were elected in unprecendented numbers in the 2018 midterms, women are still significantly underrepresented in Congress. Women make up nearly 51 percent of the United States population, according to the U.S. Census Bureau but they hold less than a quarter of the seats in Congress.


Here are all of the women who will serve in the 116th Congress, as of Thursday, Nov. 8.

Rep. Martha Roby, R-Ala., holds a news conference in the Capitol to announce the introduction of the 'Working Families Flexibility Act.'
Credit

(Bill Clark/CQ Roll Call/Getty Images)

Martha Roby

Republican, Alabama’s 2nd District

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Claire Hansen, Contributor

Claire Hansen is a reporter at U.S. News & World Report. You can follow her on Twitter and emai...  Read moreClaire Hansen is a reporter at U.S. News & World Report. You can follow her on Twitter and email her at chansen@usnews.com.

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