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How To Avoid Mandatory Vaccination

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Vaccine mandates are increasing. State governments and even some employers have been forcing vaccines on students and employees. I believe such mandates should be anathema in a free society. Vaccine mandates are only acceptable in extreme circumstances, and then only for specific people that put others at high risk.

In this article I explain how to obtain a vaccine exemption that meets the CDC’s unreasonably limited requirements for a medical exemption.

The CDC provides a list of contraindications for every vaccine. A “contraindication” is a factor or condition that means a drug or treatment must not be used. It is the most powerful reason for not getting a vaccine, stronger than other reasons for a medical exemption. Other reasions for medical exemption (e.g. immune deficiency, or presence other disease such as cancer) can be debatable, depending on severity, and ultimately leave the vaccination decision to the patient. A contraindication however affirmatively requires that a vaccine must not be given. A doctor that gives a vaccine in spite of a contraindication could be punished or sued, at least in theory.

At the bottom of this article is a table from the CDC website listing contraindications for all vaccines available in the US. Notice that every vaccine has the following contraindication:

”Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component”

This contraindication is your ticket to getting a medical exemption for any vaccine you do not want. The only thing you have to do is say that you had the vaccine in the past (possibly the distant past, like years ago), and that you experienced symptoms of anaphylaxis afterward.

Of course, you will have to lie about the symptoms of anaphylaxis. However, if done correctly, there is no way to be caught lying about the symptoms. You will have absolute and total plausible deniability, and in view of this, any doctor will be forced to approve your medical exemption request.

You could be caught lying about receiving the vaccine in the past, but only by someone who has access to your complete medical records, and only for vaccines that are normally documented in medical records. However, some vaccines are given without documentation, such as the flu vaccine, which is given at pharmacies. And sometimes vaccination is not properly recorded. So you can still plausibly claim to have received a vaccine even if it is not documented.

Most people are uncomfortable lying, and that’s (usually) a good thing. Lying can be unethical. But if someone is forcing you to receive an unwanted, harmful vaccine, I believe lying to obtain a medical exemption is completely justified. Ultimately, it is a personal decision to be made based on what you have to lose, and how strongly you feel about lying. Its up to you. The lie I propose here restores the right that your employer or the state is attempting to steal from you: the right to informed consent. This right is fundamental, and must never be denied except in the most extreme or unusual circumstances. Denial of the right to informed consent in pursuit of normal public health or employment policy is absolutely outrageous and should be strongly rejected in a free society. 

Further, it is absurd that exercising your rights requires lying to your doctor. But these are the times we are living in, so…

What Is Anaphylaxis?
Simply put, anaphylaxis is an allergic reaction that involves the entire body. All allergic reactions are fundamentally the same. All are based on the same cytokines and “mediators” (e.g. histamine), which produce the symptoms. Allergy symptoms depend on where the reaction occurs in the body. The most common reactions are dermatitis, which occurs in the skin, and hay fever (pollen allergy), which occurs in the eyes and respiratory system.

Anaphylaxis is an allergic reaction that occurs over almost the entire body. It is a systemic allergic reaction. Anaphylaxis can kill.

The risk of death from anaphylaxis is why even the corrupt and irrationally pro-vaccine CDC says that it is a vaccine contraindication, and not merely a justification for vaccine choice.

There are a couple other important aspects of anaphylaxis:
1) With each reaction, anaphylactic sensitivity typically becomes more severe. A first reaction can be mild, while a second reaction can be deadly.  There is no way to predict if a reaction will be mild or fatal. This is why even mild anaphylaxis reactions should confer a medical exemption. All anaphylactic reactions must be considered as a warning that the next reaction could be fatal.

The CDC table says that only “severe” allergic reaction is a contraindication, but anaphylaxis is always considered a “severe” reaction, not matter how mild. 

2) There is no reliable test for anaphylactic sensitivity other than deliberate exposure to the allergen, known as a “challenge test”. It is not possible to confirm or refute a claim of anaphylactic sensitivity without putting you through a dangerous (ostensibly in this scheme) challenge test.  A challenge test can only be done by administering the vaccine, which is of course contraindicated. Further, challenge test results would likely be useless because it is not possible to guarantee the test results indicate the vaccine is safe for you.

Additionally, a doctor cannot use a blood or any other sample to prove or disprove you have an anaphylactic sensitivity.

Getting a medical exemption based on anaphylactic sensitivity will usually require a letter from a doctor confirming a diagnosis of an anaphylactic reaction to the vaccine. It is easy to convince a doctor you once had an anaphylactic reaction to a vaccine, if you know a few basic facts about anaphylaxis.

Symptoms of Anaphylaxis
Anaphylaxis symptoms are highly variable, but some are quite characteristic and used for diagnosis. Anaphylaxis symptoms affect these body systems/organs:

  • skin (80% to 90% of episodes)
  • respiratory tract (70% of episodes),
  • gastrointestinal tract (30% to 45% of episodes),
  • heart and vasculature (10% to 45% of episodes), and
  • central nervous system (10% to 15% of episodes).

(From “Anaphylaxis-recent-advances-in-assessment-and-treatment“. The Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology124 (4): 625–36, PMID 19815109)

Description: Mavericks:Users:dan:Desktop:495px-Signs_and_symptoms_of_anaphylaxis.svg.png

The website of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (part of the NIH) says the following about diagnosing anaphylaxis:

How do you know if a person is having an anaphylactic reaction?”
Anaphylaxis is likely if a person experiences two or more of the following symptoms within minutes to several hours after exposure to an allergen:
-Hives, itchiness, or redness all over the body and swelling of the lips, tongue, or back of the throat
-Trouble breathing
-Severe GI symptoms such as abdominal cramps, diarrhea, or vomiting
-Dizziness or fainting (signs of a drop in blood pressure)

 

A recent review paper (“Recognition-Treatment-and-Prevention-of-Anaphylaxis“, Immunol Allergy Clin N Am 35 (2015) 363–374) identifies the following diagnostic criteria (edited for clarity):

Anaphylaxis is considered likely if any 1 of 3 criteria is satisfied within minutes to hours after exposure:
1) acute onset of illness with involvement of skin, mucosal surface, or both, and at least 1 of the following: difficulty breathing, low blood pressure, or organ dysfunction;
2) 2 or more of the following occur rapidly after exposure: involvement of skin or mucosal surface, difficulty breathing, or persistent gastrointestinal symptoms;
3) low blood pressure (dizziness, lightheadedness) develops.

The above gives us most of what we need to convincingly claim an anaphylactic reaction. It is quite easy. Here is how you do it:

1) Claim at least one skin and at least one respiratory symptom. Skin symptoms will typically be hives/rash, itchiness and flushing, occurring over a large area of the body, including the torso. Respiratory symptoms are typically shortness of breath and difficulty breathing. Full body rash + difficulty breathing is almost unquestionably anaphylaxis.

EXAMPLE: “After receiving the vaccine, while at home, my skin broke out in a rash and became itchy all over. I felt like I could not breath. ”

2) Claim at least one nervous system symptom (dizziness or feeling faint) or at least one gastrointestinal symptom (cramping, vomiting).

EXAMPLE: “I also felt like I was going to pass out and was dizzy. Later that night I vomited. I felt nauseated for several hours.”

3) Claim that the symptoms started about 0.5-2 hours after the vaccine. The more rapid the occurrence of anaphylaxis after exposure, the more likely the reaction is to be severe and potentially life threatening. Do not claim that the symptoms started within minutes. Otherwise, the doctor will wonder why you did not go to the hospital straight from the clinic were you supposedly received the vaccine.

EXAMPLE: “I started feeling strange about 1 hour after the vaccine. Symptoms got worse over the next few hours and persisted into the night. I almost went to the hospital but then it didn’t seem serious enough. I didn’t know what was happening at the time, but now I think I maybe had an anaphylactic reaction to the vaccine.”

And that’s it! Any halfway-competent doctor will immediately conclude that you had an anaphylactic reaction to the vaccine. And there is no way for any doctor, now matter how hostile, to prove you wrong. Since anaphylaxis can be deadly, even the most stubborn and unreasonable vaccine-pushing doctor will be forced to give you the benefit of the doubt and the exemption that is everyone’s right. To do otherwise could create malpractice liability for the doctor and put their license to practice medicine at risk.

If more persuasion is needed, you can direct the doctor to the CDC web page on vaccine contraindications: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/general-recs/contraindications.html

Once the doctor believes you had an anaphylactic reaction, the doctor will provide a letter stating this. This letter is your medical exemption that can be presented to any authoritarian employer, public health official or school official trying to control your personal, private medical decisions.

Claiming a past anaphylactic reaction to a vaccine virtually guarantees a medical exemption. All you have to do is claim the “right” symptoms started shortly after the vaccine.

Also, you can get multiple exemptions by claiming you received multiple vaccines prior to the reaction. Nobody will know, and it will be practically impossible to find out, which vaccine caused the reaction. Hence, you will get an exemption to all the imaginary vaccines you received prior to your imaginary reaction.

This scheme works well for gaining an exemption from vaccines sold at pharmacies. This is because vaccines given at the pharmacy are not entered into your medical records unless you do so. The pharmacy stores this data, but unless you identify the pharmacy chain, there is no way for anyone to confirm or refute this. You can simply say “I don’t remember where I got it, and I paid cash.”

CVS says the following about vaccine documentation:

5. Your vaccination can be added to your medical record.
Following your vaccination, with your permission, CVS Pharmacy or the MinuteClinic practitioner can notify your primary care physician so that the shot is added to your medical record.

https://cvshealth.com/thought-leadership/five-things-to-know-getting-vaccinated-at-cvs-pharmacy
CVS presently offers these vaccines:

  • Influenza,
  • Shingles,
  • Pneumonia,
  • HPV,
  • MMR,
  • Tdap,
  • Meningitis,
  • Hepatitis A,
  • Hepatitis B,
  • Polio


So, you can get a medical exemption to any of these vaccines by claiming you were vaccinated at CVS and then had a terrible anaphylactic reaction that night at home.

Limitations of This Scheme
The biggest limitation of this medical exemption scheme is that you must claim that you had the vaccine in the past.

Vaccine contraindications (from the CDC)
Link: https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/acip-recs/general-recs/contraindications.html

Vaccine            Contraindications

DT, Td Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component
DTaP Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component Encephalopathy (e.g., coma, decreased level of consciousness,  prolonged seizures), not attributable to another identifiable cause, within 7 days of administration of previous dose of DTP or DTaP
Hepatitis A Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component
Hepatitis B Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component Hypersensitivity to yeast
Hib Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component Age <6 weeks
HPV Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component, including yeast
IIV Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after previous dose of influenza vaccine or to vaccine component.
IPV Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component
LAIV(b) Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a vaccine component Concomitant use of aspirin or aspirin-containing medication in children and adolescents LAIV4 should not be administered to persons who have taken influenza antiviral medications within the previous 48 hours. Pregnancy
MenACWY Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component
MenB Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component
MMR(d),(e) Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component Pregnancy Known severe immunodeficiency (e.g., from hematologic and solid tumors, receipt of chemotherapy, congenital immunodeficiency, long-term immunosuppressive therapy(f) or patients with HIV infection who are severely immunocompromised) Family history of altered immunocompetence(g)
MPSV4 Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component
PCV13 Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose of PCV13 or any diphtheria-toxoid–containing vaccine or to a component of a vaccine (PCV13 or any diphtheria-toxoid–containing vaccine), including yeast
PPSV23 Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component
RIV Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) to any component of the vaccine
Rotavirus Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component SCID History of intussusception
Tdap Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component Encephalopathy (e.g., coma, decreased level of consciousness,  prolonged seizures), not attributable to another identifiable cause, within 7 days of administration of previous dose of DTP, DTaP, or Tdap
Varicella(d),(e) Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component Known severe immunodeficiency (e.g., from hematologic and solid tumors, receipt of chemotherapy, congenital immunodeficiency,  long-term immunosuppressive therapy(f) or patients with HIV infection who are severely immunocompromised)(e) Pregnancy Family history of altered immunocompetence(g)
Zoster Severe allergic reaction (e.g., anaphylaxis) after a previous dose or to a vaccine component Known severe immunodeficiency (e.g., from hematologic and solid tumors, receipt of chemotherapy, congenital immunodeficiency,  long-term immunosuppressive therapy(f) or patients with HIV infection who are severely immunocompromised)(e) Pregnancy
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